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Publication numberUS1484579 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1924
Filing dateMay 25, 1920
Priority dateMay 25, 1920
Publication numberUS 1484579 A, US 1484579A, US-A-1484579, US1484579 A, US1484579A
InventorsFrederick R Still
Original AssigneeAmerican Blower Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fan wheel and method of making the same
US 1484579 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 19 i924;

F. R. STILL 7 FAN WHEEL AND METHOD OF IAKING THE SAIE Filed w 25 .1920 a Sheets-Sheet 1 Eb. v19-, 1924. v 1,484,579

F. R. STILL FAN WHEEL AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed May25 1920' '3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Feb. 19 1924. 1,484,579

F. R. STILL FAN WHEEL AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed May 25. 1920' 3 sheets-Sheet a Patented Feb. 19, 1924.

urii'rso STATES I 1,484,579 PATENT OFFICE.

FREDERICK R. STILL, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN, ASSIGNOR TO AMERICAN BLOWER COMPANY, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN, A CORPORATION OF MICHIGAN.

FAN WHEEL AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Application filed 1913735,

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, F RnoEiucK R. STILL, a citizen of the United States, residin at Detroit, in the county of Wayne and tate of Michigan, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Fan 'heels and Methods of Making the Same, of which the following is a specification, reference being bad therein to the accompanying drawings. This invention relates to improvements in fan wheels and more especially to'fan wheels of light build having long narrow blades and a large intake, and has for its object to provide an improved, simple, st-ron light 16 fan wheel structure of this nature t at can be roduced at low cost.

eretofore in the art, it has been proposed to secure the blades to the blade-supporting elements by riveting but such constructions fhave proven unsatisfactory, the joints or connections between the parts soon shaking loose and rattling. Furthermore, riveting is especially unsuitable and is seriously objectionable in the manufacture of fan wheel structures of light build of the character referred to because the shock incident to the usual riveting operationtlamages the parts, and affects the trueness of the wheel. A particularly important novel characteristic of the present invention resides in the special method and means for securing the parts together, whereby a strong more durable structure is produced, the securing of the parts easily and more quickly effected without ineting of the parts, as commonly practiced, being entirely avoided.

Other important novel features of the invention lie in the special formation of the arts whereby they are adapted to be cheapy produced from stock materials, sheet metal sta'mpings, pressed or drawn steel, and other metals, and the particular formation of the parts for reinforcement purposes thatresults in a simple, li ht structure pos-' sessing great strength and rigidity, and in a considerable reduction in the cost of manufacture.

The invention, with other objects and advantages thereof, and the particular construction, combination and arrangement of parts comprising the same. will be understood from the following detailed description, when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings forming part herejurious shock or pressure to the parts, riv- 1920. Serial No. 384,056.

of and illustrating embodiments of the invention.

- In the drawings Figure 1 is a longitudinal section of a fan wheel or runner constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is a detail view on an enlarged scale showing in side elevation a section of one of the end plates with some of the projecting end portions of the blades arranged in posit-ion prior to the welding operation, and other end portions of blades after the welding operatiom Figure 3 is a detailed section, on an enlarged-scale, of an end portion of one of the blades and one of the supporting plates, illustrating the relation of the parts prior to the welding operation.

Figure 4 is .a view similar to Figure 3 after the welding operation.

Figure 5 is a similar view illustrating a modified method of welding.

Figure 6 is an end elevation of a slightly modified construction of fan wheel.

Figure '7 is a longitudinal sectional view of the construction illustrated in Figure 6.

Figures 8 and 9 e detailed views of one of the complete 'ilades of the construction illustrated in Figures 1 to 4, inclusive.

Figures 10- and 11 are detailed views of one of the blade blanks.

Fi ire 12 is a side elevation of the welding e ectrodes and the supporting means for the fan wheel parts.

\Vhile in the drawings I have illustrated two specific embodiments of the invention,

it will of course be understood that minor changes and variations in the particular constructions shown and the carrying out of the invention in other forms as will appeal to those skilled in the art and falling within the scope of the appended claims, may be racticed without departing from the spii it of the invention.

Referring to Figs. 1 to 4, inclusive, the structure shown comprises end plates or disks A, B, and blades C rigidly secured at opposite ends to the end plates. The end plates A, B, which are circular in form and open at the center, in the form of rings, are

provided with outwardly extending lateral ioo reinforcing flanges, the plate A having two of such flanges a, a at its inner and outer marginal portions. and the end plate B having one of such flanges b at 1ts out-er marand m ginal pert. At its inner marginal portion the blade .6 has an inward attaching extension 5'".

ojccting poi-"ions c of the blades.

as or rule rsiallv h,

The tenons or integral pror of the blades are subjected simultaneously to heat through the medium of an electric cu rent, and pressure, to melt down the outer en 7 portions thereof, and to press the met: inwardly to fill up the initial space between the tenons or integral projecting portions and the aperture Wall, and to weld the parts together. the structure after the Welding operation being shown in Figs 2 and or" the drawings. the tenons or inprojecting portions 0 being of sulficient length to provide the metal necessary to fill up the in b1 3 space between the parts the joint shown. In the manufacture of the particular construction illustrated in the drawings the blades and end plates assembled are supported by a clamp comprising members K, K. or other suitable means, the projecting portion or portions C of the blades extending through the apertures (4 ,6 in the plates spaced from the walls of the apertures as indicated in Figure 3 of the drawings. An electric welder is provided having a pair of electrodes M, M, one of which is movable relatively to the other, the electrodes being adapted to be brought together to contact with the projecting ends of one of the blades and apply pressure thereto simultaneously with the application of heat. The fan Wheel parts clamped together in assembled relation are supported to position one of the blades between the electrodes (see Figure 12 of the drawings). Sue end of the blade is placed in contact with one of the electrodes of the welder, and the other electrode is moved down on to the other projecting end portion of the blade. Simultaneously with the contact of the movable electrode with the end of the blade, the current is turned on, the ends or the blades become heated almost white hot and welded to-the end plates, the projecting end portions of the blades being melted down and under the pressure of the electrodes, filling up the intervening spaces.

The blades (1 are blanked from sheet steel or other sheet metal, as indicated in l0 and 11' or the drawings, the blades,

being afterwards curved as shown in Figs. 8 and 9 of the drawings.

"It will be understood that the number of the tenons or integral projecting portions 0 for each blade may be varied to suit the dill'crent conditions, one of said projections being sullicient in some instances.

In Fig. 5 of the drawings is illustrated another method of Welding the parts. This consists of filling the spaces between the tenous or integral projecting portions of the blades and the apertured wall with thermitc or the like, and by the application of heat. melting the same to Weld the parts together.

The modified construction illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7 of the drawings is the same as that shown in Figs-l. to 4, inclusive except that the end plates F, are shown plain, without reinforcing flanges, the fan structure being somewhat smaller, and the extension g of plate G is shown larger.

As will be understood, the end plates and blades are adapted to be cheaply produced from stock materials by stamping, pressing or analogous methods, the openings in the plates being formed by punching.

By the special construction and arrangement of parts hereinbcfore described, a sim ple, light structure is afiorded that posscsscs great. strength and rigidity, and one that can be produced at low cost. The special method and means for securing the parts results in a more eiiicient joining of the parts together, substantially an in-' tegral structure being provided, and greatly lessens the cost of production. The rivetmg process-as commonly followed in the art is dispensed with, the assembling and connection of the parts may be more easily and better accomplished, the welding o oration facilitated, and a strong, smooth y finished product and perfectly true Wheel produced.

lVhat I claim is 1. In a fan "Wheel, a blade member and blade, vided at one end with an integral projecting portion of reduced size, and the bladesupporting member having an aperture to receive the projecting end portion of the blade, the main end portion of the blade bearing against a face of the blade porting member with the adjoining projecting end portion of the blade extending into the aperture of the blade supporting member and being electrically welded thereto.

supporting 2. In a fan wheel, a blade-supporting member and blade, the blade being provided at one end with an integral projecting portion, and the blade supporting member with an aperture to receive the projecting end portion of the blade, the ro ecting end portion of the blade initia y being of a the blade being pro'-' supsize in cross section less than the size of the aperture and extendim through the aperture, the projecting end portion of the blade being melted and pressed inwardly, and the metal of the separate parts combined by electric welding. i

3. A fan wheel comprising end plates and blades rigidly secured at opposite ends thereto, each blade at each end having an integral projecting portion of reduced size, and the end plates being provided with openings to receive the projecting end portions of the blades, the main end port ons of the blades bearing against side faces of the end plates, and said projecting end portions of the blades extending through the openings in the end plates and being electrically welded thereto.

4. The process of securing fan blades to end plates or rims consisting in providing a projecting portion on the end of the. blade, and an aperture in the end plate or rim to receive the projecting end portion of the blade, forming the aperture of greater area than the initial cross sectional size of th projecting portion of the blade. and forinin the projecting portion of the blade initially of a length to provide a mass of metal beyond the outer face of the end plate or rim, supporting the blade in position relatively to the end plate or rim with said projecting portion of the blade extending through the aperture of the end plate or rim; and simultaneously applying heat and pressure to the projecting end portion of the blade to melt down the projecting end portion of the blade to fill up the space between said end'portion of the blade and the 'wall of the aperture, and weld the adjoining parts together.

5.'The process of securing fan blades to end plates or rims, consisting in providing a projecting portion on the end of the blade, and an aperture in the end plate orrim to receive the projecting portion of the blade; forming the aperture of greater area than the initial cross sectional size of the projecting portion of the blade, and forming the projecting portion of the bladeinitially of a length to'provide a mass of metal beyond the outer face of the end plate or rim;

supporting the blade in position relatively to the end plate or rim with said projecting end portion of the blade extending through the aperture of the end plate or rim, and simultaneously subjecting the projecting portion of the blade to heat through the medium of an electric current, and ap plyingpressure thereto to melt down the projecting end portion of the blade to fill up the space between said end portion of the blade and the wall of the aperture, and weld the adjoining parts together.

6. The process of securing fan blades to end plates or rims consisting in providing through the aperture of the end plate orv rim; and simultaneously applying heat and pressure to the projecting end portion of the blade and the end plate portion immediately surrounding the aperture to melt down the projecting end portion of the blade to fill up the space between said end portion of the blade and the. wall of the aperture, and weld the adjoining parts together.

7. The process of securing fan blades to end plates or rims consisting in providing a projecting portion on the end of the blade, and an aperture in the end plate or rim to receive the projecting portion on the blade, forming the aperture of the same shape and of slightly greater area than the initial cross sectional shape of the projecting end portion of the blade, and forming the projecting portion of'the blade initially of a length to provide a mass of metal beyond the outer face of the end plate or rim, supporting the blade in position relatively to the end plate or rim with said projecting portion of the blade extending through the aperture of the end plate or rim; and simultaneously applying heat and pressure to the projecting end portion of the blade to\melt down the projecting end portion of the blade to fill up the space between said end portion of the-blade and the wall of the aperture, and Weld the adjoining parts together.

8. The process of securing fan blades to end plates or rims consisting in providing a projecting portion on the end of the blade, and an aperture in the end plate or rim to receive the projecting end portion of the blade, forming the'aperture of greater area than the initlal cross sectional size of the projecting portion of the blade, and form ing the projecting portion of the blade initially of a length to provide a mass of metal beyond the outer face of the end plate or rim, supporting the bladein position relatively to the end plate or rim with the prothrough the aperture in the end plate'or Tim, and with the inner face of the latter in contact with the inner endface of the end plate or rim,a nd simultaneously applying heat and premure to the projecting end portion of the blade to melt down the projecting end portion of the blade to fill up the q 1 '1 space between said end portion of me blade d (LL adjoining parts together.

9. The process of securing fan blades to end plates or rims consisting 1n providing I a projecting portion on the end of the blade,

and an aperture in the end plate or rim to receive the projecting end portion of the blade, forming the aperture of greater area than the initial cross sectional size of the projecting portion of the blade, and forming the projecting oortion of the blade initially of a length to provide a mass of metal beyond the outer face of the end plate of rim at least substantially equal to the difierence in the cross sectional size of the projecting portion of the blade and the area of the aperture'supporting the blade in position relatively to the end plate or rim with said projecting portion the blade extending through the aperture of the end plate or rim, and simultaneously applying heat and pressure to the projecting end portion of the blade to melt down the projecting end portion. of the blade to till up the space between said end portion of the blade and t e wall of the aperture, and weld the adjoining parts together.

10. The process of securing fan blades to end plates or rims consisting in providing a 1' 4- 1 p10 ectlng portion on the end oi the blade, and an aperture in the end plate or rim, forming the aperture of greater area than the initial cross sectional size of the projecting end portion of ti e blade, and, forming each projecting end portion of the blade initially of a length to provide a mass of metal beyond the outer face of the end plate or rim, supporting the blade in position between the end plates or rims with the projecting end portion of the blade extending through the apertures of the end plates or rims, and simultaneously applyinglieat and pressure to the projecting end portion of the blade and the end plate ortion surrounding the apertures to me t down the projecting end portions of the blade to fill up the space between said end portions of the blade and the walls of the apertures, and weld the adjoining parts together.

11. The method of making fan wheels con sisting in providing the blades with a projecting portion on each end of the blade, and apertures in the end plates or rims to receive the projecting end portions of the blades, forming the apertures of greater area than the initial cross sectional size of the projecting portions of the blades, and formmg the projecting portions of the blades initially of a length to provide a mass of metal beyond the outer faces of the end plates or rims. supporting the blades and rims in assembled position with the projecting portions of the blades extending through the apertures of the end plates or rims; and

the wall of the aperture and Weld the simultaneously applying heat and pressure to the projecting end portions of each blade to melt down the projecting end portions of 'the blade to fill up the space between said end portions of the blades and the walls of the apertures, and weld the adjoining parts together.

12. The method of making fan wheels consisting in providing'the blades with a projecting portion on each end of the blade, and apertures in the end plates or rims to receive the projecting end portions of the blades, forming the apertures of greater area than the initial cross sectional size of the projecting portions of the blades, and forming the projecting portions of the blades initially of a length to provide m'asses of metal beyond the outer faces of the end plates or rims. supporting the blades and rims in assembled position with the projecting portions of the blades extending through the apertures of the end plates or rims, and simultaneously subjecting the projecting end portions of each blade to heat through the medium of an electric current and applying pressure thereto to melt down the projecting end portions of the blade to fill up the space between said end portions of the blade and the walls of the apertures, and weld the adjoining parts together.

13. The method of making fan wheels con sisting in providing the blades with a pro jecting portion on each end of the blade, and apertures in the end plates or rims to receive the projecting end portions of the blades, forming the apertures of greater area than the initial cross sectional size of the projecting portions of the blades, and forming the projecting portions of the blades -initially of a length to provide masses of metal beyond the outer faces of the end plates or rims, supporting the blades and rims in assembled position with the projecting portions of the blades extending through the apertures of the'end plates or rims and' simultaneously subjecting the projecting end portions of each blade to heat and pressure bya pair of combined electrodes and pressing members operating simultaneously upon the opposite ends of the blade.

14. The method of making fan wheels consisting in providing the blades with a projecting portion on each end thereof, and apertures in the endplatos or rims to re ceive the projecting end portions of the blades, forming theapertures of greater area than the initial cross sectional size of the projecting portions of the blade, and forming the pro ecting portions of the blade initially of a length to provide masses of metal beyond the outer faces of the end plates or rims supporting the blades and rims held together in assembled position with the projecting portions of the blades extending through the apertures in the end plates, and the latter in contact with the end faces of the blades, and then simultaneously applying heat and pressure to the projecting end portions of each blade and the end plate portions surrounding the apertures to melt down said projecting end portions of the blade to fill up the spaces between the projecting end portions of the blade and the walls of the apertures, and

weld the adjoining parts together.

15. The method of making fan Wheels consisting in providing the blades with a projecting portion on each end thereof, and apertures in the end plates or rims to re ceive the projecting end portions of the blades, forming the apertures of greater area than the initial cross sectional size of the projecting portions of the blade, and forming the projecting portions of the blade initially of a length tov provide masses of metal eyond the outer faces of the end plates or rims, supporting the blades and rims held together in assembled position be tween clamps engaging the end plates with the projecting portions of the blades extending through the apertures in the end plates, and the latter in contact with the end faces of the blades, and then simultaneously applying heat and pressure to the projecting end portions of each blade and the end plate portions surrounding the apertures to melt down said projecting end portions of the blade to fill up the spaces between the projecting end portions of the blade andthe walls of the apertures, and Weld the adjoining parts together.

16. The method of making fan Wheels consisting in providing the blades with a projecting portion on each end thereof, and apertures in the end plates or rims to receive the projecting end portions of the blades, forming the apertures of slightly greater area and of the same shape as the initial cross sectional shape and size of the projecting portions of the blade. and forming the projecting portions of-the blade initially of a length to provide masses of metal beyond the. outer faces of the end plates or rims, supporting the blades and rims held tightly together in assembled position with the projecting portions of the blades extending through the apertures in the end plates, and the latter in contact with the end faces of the blades, and then simultaneously applying heat and pressure to the projecting end portions of each blade, and the end plate portions surrounding the apertures to melt down said projecting end portions of the blade to fill up the space be tween the projecting end portions of the blade and the Walls of the apertures, and Weld the adjoining parts together.

In testimony whereof I hereunto affix my signature in the presence of two witnesses.

FREDERICK R. STILL. Witnesses W. E. METTLER, E. BREDE-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2429287 *Jul 18, 1942Oct 21, 1947Westinghouse Electric CorpApparatus for uniting leads to lamp contacts
US2442420 *Sep 4, 1945Jun 1, 1948Preco IncAir impeller housing
US2542913 *Oct 29, 1947Feb 20, 1951Ford Motor CoMethod of assembling torque converters
US2549208 *May 20, 1946Apr 17, 1951American Blower CorpFan and method of assembly and disassembly
US2553922 *Dec 20, 1944May 22, 1951Koontz Lamont BMetallic structure
US2598620 *Feb 21, 1947May 27, 1952Ford Motor CoHydraulic torque transmitting device
US2628419 *Nov 22, 1946Feb 17, 1953Lau Blower CoBlower
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US2644665 *Dec 13, 1947Jul 7, 1953Chrysler CorpArticle with passages
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US2717554 *May 19, 1949Sep 13, 1955Stalker Edward AFluid machine rotor and stator construction
US2745171 *Sep 8, 1949May 15, 1956Niagara Blower CoMethod of producing a bladed structure
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US4993619 *Aug 20, 1990Feb 19, 1991General Motors CorporationJoint and method for single side welding and self-fixturing of closed steel sections
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US5878940 *Jan 16, 1996Mar 9, 1999Deere & CompanyMethod of fabricating sheet metal structures by welding and structure formed thereby
US6241144Sep 30, 1999Jun 5, 2001Caterpillar Inc.Friction fit tab and slot shape
US6374750Nov 16, 1999Apr 23, 2002Aero Transportation Products, Inc.Structural panel system
US6412251Aug 30, 2000Jul 2, 2002Aero Transportation Products, Inc.Web core structural panel
DE1168701B *Apr 19, 1962Apr 23, 1964Bmw Triebwerkbau GmbhHohlschaufel fuer Turbomaschinen
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Classifications
U.S. Classification228/171, 164/DIG.120, 29/510, 76/DIG.500, 416/213.00A, 416/213.00R, 219/94, 222/135, 29/889.4, 29/522.1
International ClassificationB21D53/78
Cooperative ClassificationY10S76/05, Y10S164/12, B21D53/78
European ClassificationB21D53/78