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Publication numberUS1488244 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1924
Filing dateOct 1, 1920
Priority dateOct 1, 1920
Publication numberUS 1488244 A, US 1488244A, US-A-1488244, US1488244 A, US1488244A
InventorsSebastian Hinton
Original AssigneeJunglegym Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Climbing structure
US 1488244 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 25, 1924. 1,488,244

S. HINTON CLIMBING STRUCTURE Fild OCt. l, 1920@ 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 f on Q .i 1

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S. HINTON CLIMBING STRUCTURE Filed Oct. 1 1920 March 25 1924.

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Mar. 25, 1924.

narran sr SEBASTIAN HINTON, 0F WINNETKA, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO JUNG-LEGYM, INC., OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS.

CLIMBING STRUCTURE.

Appncation mea october 1, 1920. serial No. 414,030.

To all whom t may concern Be it known that I, SEBASTIAN HINTON, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of lVinnetka, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Climbing Structures, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to climbing apparatus, for children. It is an object of the invention to provide for playgrounds or the like, or for athletic establishments, in general, an apparatus wherein the manifest advantages of climbing as an exercise can be freely utilized and made available, while the dangers incident to miscellaneous climbing, such as tree climbing or the like, can be minimized.

In la co-pending application, Serial No. 398,178, filed July 22, 1920, patented October 23, 1923, No. 1,471,465, I have disclosed an illustrative climbing apparatus comprising a structure made up of outline cubes or in other words, a reticulated structure so proportioned and designed as to permit climbing in any direction. The structure there shownY was fabricated out of cut-to-length oppositely threaded pipe and has been employed with great success.

In the drawings, 'which represent an illustrative embodiment of the invention:

Fig. 1 is an elevation of a climbing structure, made in accordance with the invention,

Fig. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of one corner thereof,

Fig. 3 is a broken-out elevation, showing a compression member,

Fig. 4 is a perspective View, separated out, showing one of the central c ouplings and associated climbing elements, and

Fi 5 is a cross sectional view showing certain details of the coupling construction.

The structure as a whole is a reticulated rectangular structure which may be made of any desired size, provided its proportions are practical. It comprises a series of 22ertical elements referred t0 generally by reference character 1, and two series of horizontal elements referred to generally7 by reference characters 2 and 3, Fig. 2, the series of elements 2 being preferably at right angles to series 3.

The structure is so designed that a boy, for instance, of eight years old, may make a diagonal climb from one horizontal climbing element above, in the next adjacent vertical plane; the climb being facilitated by grasping the horizontal climbing element above that to which the climb is made.

In an illustrative forni of the apparatus, which has been in actual use, the horizontal elements are spaced two feet apart, horizontally and vertically. I have found, however, that children seem to like to climb through the structure to some particular point'and there swing head downward by the knees, calling back and forth to each other, a trick which can be explained of course only by the monkey instinct.

The present illustrative form of the structure is designed to afford greater opportunities for this, as well as to permit lateral progress through the structure, somewhat more easily than that possible with the structure in which the cubes are two feet on a side. Thus, referring to Fig. 2, I make the horizontal bars 2 and 3, comprising the bars in each vertical plane, three feet apart, and I stagger these bars in adjacent parallel vertical planes so that the distance between parallel adjacent bals, in adjacent vertical planes will be a foot and one half in a vertical direction. Thus the vertical distance between the outside bar 3 and the bar 3, (Fig. 2) is one and one half feet and the distance between the bars 2 and the adjacent bars 2', (Fig. 2) will also be a foot and one half in a vertical direction, this relationship being preferably persisted in throughout the entire structure no matter what its size, and being varied only at the top and bottom where additional bars such as 22 are inserted to make the structure level.

In this form of apparatus, an eight year old boy, being approximately four feet high, can easily duck through the three feet space between superposed horizontal bars, while at the same time he can readily make the diagonal climb previously referred to. He can also comfortably swing by his knees from any of the horizontal bars, without hitting his head on the horizontal bar immediately below.

In the structure herein disclosed, I make the horizontal distance, or `length of the horizontal climbing elements 2 and 3, two feet. Thus the horizontal unit in the illustrative structure herein disclosed is two feet, the vertical unit is three feet, and the climbing unit, is a diagonal climb, on a series of verticale, the coup in diagonal whose base is two feet and whose vertical side is one and one half feet,--in other words the climbbetween the lower element 3 (Fig. 2), and the next element 3 above it.

I shall, new more specifically describe the structure shown in the drawings. For the verticale l, I preferably employ throu Theft, oppositeiy threaded pipe sections. )y examination of the structure shown in Fig. 2, (which willi reveal that structure better than a description), it wiil be seen that every alternate vertical support Awill he made in three foot lengths with couplings at the top and bottom, as shown at i, l in Fig. 2. The couplings used with the verticale 1, 1 will be six way couplings 4, in the interior of the structure, and four way angle couplings on the corners as indicated at Ll and four way plain crosses at the tcp and bottom as indicated by 42, all couplings being oppositely threaded in the vertical run.

Ot course six way couplings could be used throughout, if desired; that is in the piace of the couplings 4 and 42 and all the surface couplin s correspondingly modified, to

ermit additions to the structure after it is rst erected.

The other series of vertical members will comprise pipe lengths 12 one and one halt` feet in length or rather of such a length that two thereof and the intervening coupling 5 will make up a length equal to the length of the three foot couplino's 1. With this will be plain crosses such as shown at 5, tiroughout the structure and other plain crosses or Ts such as shown at 5 on the surface, and four way angle crosses, such as shown at 52 at the corners.

I will now describe the couplings employed. The outside couplings, i. e. those couplings upon the four vertical sides and the top of the structure, will be oppositely threaded in each run and the associatd horizontal bars 2', 22, and 3', 32, Fig. 2, will be oppositely threaded steel pipe to correspond. Thus the entire outer wall or skin of the structure will be fabricated out of oppositely threaded pipe and couplings to match.

The interior couplings such as 4, whether six way couplings, as there shown, or four way couplings 5, will be cast to correspond to the shape shown in Fig. 4, and oppositely threaded in the vertical run only as shown at 6.

The climbing elements in the illustrative embodiment of the invention herein disclosed are made of pipe. The interior couplings are therefore suitably made as shown in Figs. 4 and 5, to present threaded sockets 6 in the vertical run, and smooth sockets 7 for the horizontal run. Each horizontal run is lprovided with a shoulder 8.

One end of each horizontal run is provided with a cast lug 9, and one end of each plain climbingvelement 2 or 3 is milled as at 10 to engage said lug. This is to prevent the bars from turning.

The assembly of a construction of the type shown will be exceedingly simple. Thus, for instance, two adjacent outer walls can vbe erected of oppositely threaded pipe.

After this the roof or ceiling may be put on. The verticale may be put together on the ground and suspended in the ceiling, certain thereof extending into holes in the ground, in which they may be blocked up on a brick or stone to support the ceiling. When all the verticals are in place, the climbing elements 2 and 3 can be inserted by springing the verticals apart enough at each coupling to permit this. There the two remaini sides can be put on, of oppositely threadld pipe. After this by going over the outer layer, or skin oit the structure, comprising the four walls and the top, with a pipe wrench, this skin can be shrunk to putthe interior under very heavy compression. The compression so produced will cause the climbing bars 3 and 2 to abut so firmly against the shoulders 8, in their sockets, that they can never be pulled out by a child, and they will brace the verticale from all sides. However, if it be found to be desirable to add additional ties toward the center of oa ch vertical wall this may be done in the manner shown in Fig. 3, wherein a heavy tie wire 11 is employed, which passes through the structure inside a succession of alined pipes 2 or 3 and is attached at one end to the cap 12, at the other to the bolt 13, passingthrough cap 14, and tightened by nut 15..

The surface coupling, in association with the tie wire, may either have an extra run as shown or be merely drilled to permit the tie wire to pass through to the outside of the structure.

As many of these ties can be placed across the structure as desired, though it is not believed that any will be necessary, except possibly in a very large structure. After the structure has been thus tightened u the holes in which the verticale rest can filled with concrete. `Of course other methods of erection may be employed.

I make considerable point of the great strength of the structure, as this is important. Thus most persons have seen a monkey in a zoo, seize the bars of his ca with hands and feet and throw his bo y violently back and forth, other monkeys following suit. Children in the structure I have erected do the same thing, apparently unconscious of any imitation of monke s. It can be appreciated that with twentyve orthirty heavy boys doing this, the strains on the structure are very at. In the structure herein disclosed the walls `and top l cured at their tops in the top or ceiling "of the structure and many of them sunk in concrete at their bases. All of them are braced either every three feet or every foot and a half by the climbing elements 2, 3, which impinge against the verticals or four sides under heavy pressure. The structure is then made strong enough to stand severe strains which for safetys sake is extremely desirable.

Crossed ropes14 ean-beemployed at the bottom of the structure, and as much as desired upward from, say, about the level of six feet, including the top, can be covered with ordinary fence wire, if desired, to prevent children falling ofi' the outside of the structure. This has been omitted from the drawings as 4it would confuse them. It is not believed that either of these recautions will be necessary, as a child fal ing in the structure will have so many opportunities to catch a bar or vertical, that it is almost impossible that he will fall through it to the ground.

T he -structure herein shown is extremely efliclent for supervised athletic work. Thus classesof children can be put into 4one of these structures and made to take almost any conceivable exercise. The structure is compact and may be employed in the most limited playground. In order to further improve the efficiency with a class of children, l have used on the level of three and six feet above the ground an alternately spaced five way couplin instead of four, or six way instead of ve on the outside of the Structure. In the extra threaded. socket thus provided, the bars 16 are tightly screwed, and are connected by a rail 17, shown in cross section. Additional diagonal braces may of course be employed -to support this bar 16. i

These bars form chinning bars on which an entire class of children can take chinning exercises, as a part of various tests or exercises customarily used in supervised athletic work. It has been a problem in this field heretofore, to find ade nate means whereby a large number of chil ren can all chin themselves at once in competition.

Having now described my invention, I claim:

1. In a layground apparatus, a..reticu lated clim ing structure, comprising in combination an outer layer adapted to be shrunk, an inner body comprising vertical supports and horizontal climbing bars, associated with said vertical supports by slip ]o1nts, whereby said inner body may bc put into compression by shrinking said outer layer to prevent disengagement at said slip joints.

2. A climbing structure for playgrounds, comprising supports, climbing bars, arranged thereon and o'set from each other laterally adjacent climbing bars being in different vertical planes, and spaced to permit a diagonal c imb by an average child of predetermined age from one climbing bar to another laterally ofset therefrom.

3. A climbing structure for playgrounds .or the like, comprising supports, climbing bars, arranged thereon and offset from each other laterally adjacent climbing bars being in diderent vertical planes, and spaced to ermit a diagonal climb by an avera e chi d of predetermined age from one clim ing bar to another laterally offset therefrom, said climbing bars exten ing in two dlrections in two series of parallel bars.

4. A climbing structure for play grounds, for athletic grounds or the like, comprising supports, climbing bars, arranged thereon and offset from each other, laterally adjacent climbing bars being in different vertical planes, and spaced to permit a diagonal climb from one climbing bar to another laterally oset therefrom, said climbing bars being arranged to permit a diagonal climb from one bar to an adjacent bar laterally offset therefrom, the next bar above the bar to which the climb is made being within reach of the hands to facilitate the climb.

5. A climbing structure for athletic grounds or the like, comprising a plurality of vertical supports, a plurality of horizontal climbing bars secured thereto, said climbing bars being arranged in two nonparallel series, a plurality of the bars in each series being parallel to each other, said bars being so arranged that adjacent bars in horizontal directions are on differenti planes.

6. A climbing structure for athletic grounds or the llke, comprising a plurality of vertical supports, a plurality of horizontal climbin bars secured thereto, said climbing bars icing arranged in two nonparallel series, a plurality of the bars in each series being parallel to each other, said bars being so arranged that adjacent bars in horizontal directions are on different planes, the bars being approximately two fecle; in length and three feet apart vertica 7.y A climbing structure for athletic grounds or the like, comprising a plurality of verticalsupports, a plurality of horizontal climbing bars, secured thereto, said climbing bars being arranged in two nonparallel series, a plurality of the bars in each series being' parallel to each other, said bars being so arranged that adjacent bars in horizontal directions are on different- Vplanes, and so spaced that a diagonal climb zontal bars arranged at ri ht angles to each other and secured to said supports, said horizontal bars being arranged in vertical planes and the bars in each vertical plane being offset vertically ytrom the bars in adjacent vertical planes.

9. A rectangular climbing structure for playgrounds comprising a series of vertical supports, horizontal bars arranged at right angles to each other and secured to said supports, said horizontal bars being arranged in vertical planes and the bars in each vertical plane being offset vertically from the bars in adjacent vertical planes, all so constructed proportioned and arranged as to permit climbing in any direction through the structure, by an average child of predetermined age.

10. A climbing structure for playgrounds or the like comprising, in combination, a plurality of vertical supports, couplings arranged in said supports, horizontal climbing bars fitted at` their ends to said couplings by slip joints and arranged to cross each other to form a cellular structure, and means for holding the structure together.

11. A climbing structure for playgrounds or the like comprising, in combination, a plurality of vertical supports, couplings arranged in said supports, horizontal climbinfr bars fitted at their ends to said couplmgs and extending in a plurality of directions to make a cellular structure, the horizontal bars in the interior of the structure being fitted to the couplings by slip joints, those on the surface being fitted to the couplings by positive joints.

12. A climbing structure for playgrounds or the like comprising, in combination, a plurality of vertical supports, couplings arranged in said supports, horizontal climbing bars fitted at their ends to said couplings, saidv vertical and horizontal elements forming a cellular structure, the horizontal bars in the interior of the structure being fitted to the couplings by slip joints, those on the surface being fitted to the couplings by threaded joints.

13. A climbing structure for playgrounds or the like comprising, in combination, a plurality of vertlcal supports, couplings arranged in said supports, horizontal climbingtbars fitted at their ends to said couplings by slip joints, and arranged in a plurality of directions, means to prevent said bars from turning, and means for holding the structure together.

14. A climbing structure for playgrouds or the like made ot lengths of pipe and pipe couplings and comprising a threedimensional structure made up of a series of vertical supports, pipe lengths itted horizontally between said couplings by slip couplings between said supports in the interior of the structure and by threaded positive couplings on the surface of the structure.

15. A climbing structure for playgrounds or the like made of lengths ot' pipe and pipe couplings and comprising a series ot vertial supports, pipe lengths litted horizontally between said couplings by slip couplings between said su ports in the mterior of the struct-ure and y threaded positive couplings on the surface of the structure, and tension means to kee the structure from spreading, extending t rough certain of said pipe len hs.

16. A climbing structure for athletic/ grounds or the like com rising a cellular structure made up of cells bounded by climbing elements, to ermit climbing progress by an average child of predetermined age through the structure in three dimensions electively, said lclimbi elements being connected together by si joints, and an outer layer or skin adapte to be shrunk on the structure to put the interior thereof in compression. Y

17. A climbing structure for playgrounds comprising a cellular climblng frame, adapted to permit elective climbing in three dimensions by an average child of predetermined age from points in its interior, said structure being fabricated out of pipe, with slip joints in its interior, and an exterior surface or skin comprising oppositel threaded horizontal pipe sections vertica and corresponding couplings whereby the skin can be shrunk on to put the interior into compression.

18. A climbing structure for playgrounds, adapted to permit elective climbing in three dimensions from oints in its interior by an average child o predetermined age, said structure bein fabricated out of pipe and having lugs an recesses co-operating 1n the horizontal pipe sections to prevent the SEBASTIAN HINTON.

lib

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4339123 *Jun 10, 1981Jul 13, 1982Rich Rolland WT-Joint structure for trampolines and the like
US5474025 *Oct 13, 1994Dec 12, 1995Alliance Pet Supply Company LimitedFor a wire mesh animal cage
US6475117 *Jul 14, 1999Nov 5, 2002Landscape Structures, Inc.Connection/Structure
US7494444May 12, 2005Feb 24, 2009Ca06, LlcRecreational structure using a sleeve-joint coupling
US7927254Dec 15, 2004Apr 19, 2011Cao6, LlcRecreational structure using a sleeve-joint coupling
US8137242Apr 21, 2006Mar 20, 2012Ca06, LlcRecreational structure using a coupling member
US8574132Oct 7, 2011Nov 5, 2013Ca06, LlcTrampoline with sleeve joint coupling
WO2001006895A2 *Jul 21, 2000Feb 1, 2001Israel Christine CarolineA baby gym and a clamp unit
Classifications
U.S. Classification482/36
International ClassificationA63B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2208/12, A63B9/00
European ClassificationA63B9/00