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Publication numberUS1488436 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1924
Filing dateApr 28, 1920
Priority dateApr 28, 1920
Publication numberUS 1488436 A, US 1488436A, US-A-1488436, US1488436 A, US1488436A
InventorsPugh John D
Original AssigneePugh John D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of and apparatus for transporting slag
US 1488436 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 25 1924.

J. D. PUGH METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR TRNSIORTING` SLAG Filed April 28 1920 3 ShQets-Shee't 1 attorney March 25 -1924. I 1,488,436

J. D. PUGH METHOD oF AND APPARATUS Foa TRANsPoRTING SLAG Filed Abril 28, 1920 s sheets-sheet 2 March 25,1924. n 5 J. D. PuGH METHOD OF AND APPARATUS' FOR TRANSPORTING SLAGV Filed April 2s'. 1920 s sheets-sheets Patented Mar. 25, 1924.

narran A stares PATENT OFFICE.

mTHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR TBANSPORTING SLAG.

Application led April 28, 1920. Serial No. 377,211.

To all whom t may concer/n.:

Be it known that I, JOHN D. PUGH, a citizen of the United States, and residing at Mount Washington, Baltimore, Maryland,

have invented certain new and useful Imn provements in Methods of and Apparatus for Transporting'Slag, of which the followy ing is a specification. c

The object of this invention is to provide a ladle for transporting molten slag produced by blast furnaces and similar industrial plants to remote points for its disposal, having novel and improved means whereby the slag is prevented from solidifying in the ladle in cases where a considerable length of time elapses before the dumping point is reached.

In general, slag is a poor conductor of heat and it often happens that the router .Y layer of the liquid slag in a slag conveyor or ladle solidies whilepthe ladle is being transported due to the fact that the central portion of the slag will not transfer its heat to the outside layer as quickly as the outside layer will radiate its heat, the result being that the outer layer becomes chilled and solidifies while the inner portion is still very hot and in liquid condition. The invention contemplates the use, with a slag 3e conveying ladle, of means for agitating the slag so that it circulates within the ladle 'and has no stationary outer layers which by rapid radiation will become chilled and solidified. y

The invention further contemplates means for introducing combustible material into the ladle, the materials so introduced being burned therein to keep the slag in a molten condition. This feature is of great practical value where slag is to be transported a considerable distance and where the ladle conveying the same may be delayed in transsit, as for instance where the ladle is mounted upon a car body and is moved, with others, in a trainto the dumping point.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 illustrates in side elevation a car having a slag conveying ladle mounted thereon which has two forms of the slag agitating and heating mechanism attached thereto, portions of the ladle being broken away;l I

Figure 2 is a section Figure l;

Figure 3 is a section on the line 3 3 0f 55 Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a section on the line 4--4 of Figure 1;

Figure 5 is a view similar'to Figure 1 but showing a modified form of heating 'and oo agitating apparatus.

The slag ladle L comprises a cylindrical central portion and conical end portions integral therewith, and its pivotally mounted at its ends on a specially designed Car truck. This form of ladle, which is'described and claimed in Patent No. 1,251,282, issued to me December 25, 1917, is well adapted to have the improved slag agitating and heating mechanism attached thereto, but 7o it will be understood that other forms of ladles may be used if desired, yand that the invention is not limited in its scope to the particular form of ladle illustrated and described. y Preferably the ladle has an outer metallic casing 10 and an inner layer 11 of refractory material, capable of withstanding great heat. Spouts having covers 13 are provided on the line of on the cylindrical portion of the ladle above 30 i its central axis and equidistant horizontally therefrom, and the openings through these spouts constitute inlet and outlet openings for the molten slag. Y Y

In one form of the invention, illustrateds in Figures 1 and 2, one of the conical end. portions is provided with an opening 14 through which the inclined pipe 15 extends downwardly into the interior of the ladle. This pipe has an inner portion 16 of metal, o0 and an outer coating of refractory materialV 17 and at its lower end is located a nozzle 18 of refractory material, bolted to the pipe 16 as is clearly illustrated in Figure 3, and having a central orifice 19. The upper end o5 of the pipe 15 may be horizontal and has rigidly mounted thereon a fuel container or receptacle 20 having a hopper-shaped bottom and a removable cover 21.

This hopper 2O is adapted to contain pul- 100 verulent fuel, such as coal or coke braize Y which passes through a restricted orifice in its bottom and into the interior of the horizontal portion of pipe 15. Located within the tube are two compressed air nozzles, 22 and 23 respectively, which are connected to a pipe 24 leading to a source of co1nressed air referabl antairV com ressor 5 Vmounted uponthe engine of the train of which the car comprises a unit. A valve 25 Vcontrols the passage of compressed air 'to the nozzles 22 and 23, and a second valve 26 Y is provided for the purpose rof reducing the pressure of the air passing to the nozzle 23, if desired.

The collar 27 secured to the ladle has an aperture in alignment with the aperture 14 and this collar isprovided with a set screw 28 whichbears against a block 29 in Contact with the pipe 15. By loosening the set screw the pipe 15 may be so adjusted that its outletV orifice 19 is at any desired depth Y below the surface of the molten slag contained in the ladle. AA branch pipe conducts air under pressure from the pipe 24 to the fuelreservoir 2O above the' level of the fuel therein to insure a proper feeding of the fuel to theaspirating nozzles against .the pressure in the pipe 15 resulting from the pressure ofthe slag at the mouth of the tube. sure on the surface of the fuel to be regulated as desired.

In the-operation of the device the compressed air which issues from the nozzles 22 and Y23 conveys the Ypulverulent fuel downwardly into the body of molten slag where itis burned, the heat generated by its combustion being absorbed by the slag and the products of' combustion passing upwardly and out through one of the-spouts, the cover of which may be removed for that purpose. The quantity of air supplied by the nozzles 22 and 23 is sufficient to support the combustion of the fuel'introduced, and

' its pressure is such that it will displace the slag tending to obstruct its iiow. 1f desired,

- one of the nozzles 22 or 23 may be discarded and a single nozzle used. The coinpressed air and products of combustion passing upwardly through the -rnoltcn slag'agitate the same, and cause currents of hot slag to flow from the centeinof the ladle toward and along` the walls thereof preventing chilling and solidification of the outer layer of the material. This effect will be realized if air alone is introduced and, in some cases,

the supplying of combustibles may be dispensed with. Y

Upon the other conical end portion of the ladle'may be placed a second hopper 50, also adapted to contain pulve'rulent or granular fuel and to feed 'the same into a Vhorizontal conduit 51 opening into the interior A valve 41 enables the air pres-V neeaaee of the ladle above the level of the slag. AnV

aspirating nozzle 52 blows the fuel through this conduit and into `the ladle where it isY burned and serves to keep the slag inV a molten condition. A pipe 53 provided with Y a regulating valve 54 conducts air under pressure to the hopper above the surface of the fuel therein to insure a proper feeding of the fuel to the aspirating nozzle. It will b e apparent Yhoweverthat inrthis construction the back pressure will lie-negligible as the orifice ofthe conduit 51 isi above the level of the slag, and the air pipe-53 may be dispensedwith, if desired. l

` ln the forni of the invention illustrated in Figure 5 thev fuel tank 20 is suitable-for oil or other liquid fuel, which passes down-VVV wardlyY through conduit 30 into .pipe 15 where it is atomized by an air nozzle 22, connected to a suitable source of'compressed air. The pipe 15 is provided with two branch pipes 31 and 32 ofV flexible material`v and armored to resist the. destructive effect of molten slag in case slag should enter the Y f same. The pipe 31 has an orifice 33 in the top of the ladle and pipe 32 has anoriiice 34 in the bottom of the ladle. Suitable valves 35, 36 and 37,.control the passage 'of fuel and air from the atomizer through thepipes 15, 31 and 32 respectively, so tliatany of these may be cut off or Vall may be used, asl

Thepipe 15 is adjustable7 as in y the first form described, the connected flexi ble pipes 31 andV 32 havingsufiicient loose-4 desired.

ness to permit any desired adjustment.

fuel tank above the fuel level to'insure proper feeding of the fuel to the pipe 15A against the pressure existing therein due to" the slag at the mouth of the pressure of the tube. Y

By this, arrangement a flame may be burned above the surface of the slag, or at the bottom of the slag ladle, or at any depth' beneath the surface of the slag found de sirable. Y Y

While it is desirable to use a ladle ofthe type illustrated and Vdescribed in connection pipe 40 'providedv with a regulratingY valve 4l conducts air underpressure to the Y with the slag heating and agitating means,

Cil

ladle in a completely molten state for long periods of time, advantages not realized by the various slag ladles heretofore designed or suggested.

Having thus described the invention what is claimed as new and desired to be scoured by Letters Patent is:

l. ln a device for transporting molten material, in combination, a ladle, and means including a pipe adjust-ably mounted on said ladle and having an orifice within the same for introducing combustible material into the slag at any desired depth below its surface, for the purpose set forth.

2. ln a device for transporting molten material, in combination, a ladle having an aperture, and means for introducing a combustible material into the slag at any desired depth below its surface, including a pipe extending through said aperature and having an outlet orifice within said ladle, and means on said ladle for adjustably securing said pipe in position.

8. In a device for transporting molten material, in combination, a ladle and means including a fuel hopper mounted on the ladle and a compressed air handling device associated therewith, for introducing pulverulent material into said ladle, for the purpose set forth.

4. ln a device for transporting molten material, in combination, a ladle and means including a hopper mounted on the ladle and opening into a conduit which communi- Cates with the ladle, and a compressed air nozzle in said conduit, for introducing pulverulent material into said ladle, for the purpose set forth.

5. ln a wheeled device for transporting molten material, in combination, a ladle and means for introducing combustible material into the material through the bottom of the ladle, for the purpose set forth.

6. ln a wheeled car for transporting molten material, in combination, a tiltable ladle mounted on the car frame and means including a fuel supply tank supported on the ladle, for introducing combustible material into the ladle, for the purpose set forth.

7. In a wheeled car for transporting molten material, in combination, a ladle formed to completel5T enclose a material retaining chamber, an opening being provided in the top for the introduction and Withdrawal of molten material, and means being provided for the introduction of combustible material into the chamber to heat the material, the products of combustion escaping from the chamber through said opening.

8. ln a wheeled car for transporting material, in combination, a ladle having heavy walls of heat resistant material, the walls completely enclosing a material retaining chamber having a relatively small opening in its top for the introduction and withdrawal of material in a molten condition, and means on said oar for introducing combustible material into the chamber t'o be burned to heat the slag, the products of combustion escaping through said opening.

9. In a wheeled car for transporting molten material, in combination, a ladle, and means for introducing a combustible material into said ladle below the surface of the material including a pipe having its outlet orifice inside the ladle and below the level of the surface of the material, a fuel tank opening into said pipe above the level of the surface of the slag, and means for'conducting compressed air to said tank and pipe.

l0. ln a wheeled car for transporting molten material, in combination, a ladle, and means for introducing a combustible material into said ladle below the surface of the material including a pipe having its outlet orifice inside the ladle and below the level of the surface of the material, a fuel tanlr opening into said pipe above the level of the surface of the material, and means for conducting compressed 'air into the fuel tank to force fuel into the pipe and means for conducting compressed air into the upper end of the pipe to entrain the fuel issuing from the fuel tank and force it through the pipe and into the rbody of the material.

1l. The method of maintaining material in a liquid state while being transported in a ladle consisting in introducing a combustible mixture into the body of the material which ignites therein, the products of combustion flowing upwardly therethrough to agitate and heat the slag.

l2. A car for transporting materials in a molten state including in combination, a wheeled support, a container for such material substantially closed and designed to retain heat, said container having a restricted opening in its top, and means for introducing a gas into the body of the material in said container.

13. A. car for transporting materials in a molten state including in combination, a wheeled support, a container for such material substantially closed and designed to ret-ain heat, said container having a restricted opening in its top, a fuel reservoir, and means for introducing fuel from said reservoir into said container.

le. A container for transporting molten materials having a substantially rclosed body and designed to retain heat, said container having openings in the bottom and top for the introduction of combustible material and escape of the products of combustion respectively, and means on the container for introducing combustible material through said bottom opening.

15. ln a device for transporting molten materia-l, in combination, a ladle and means including a fuel supply reservoir mounted on the ladle and a fuel conduit associated 5 therewith,V for intoducing e combustible fuel into the bodyv of the material.

` 16. In device for transporting molten material, in combination, a ladle and ineens 1 ,weies including a fuel supply reseivoir` mounted v`on the ladle, a fuel v,conduit associated therewith, and means for supplying compressed air to the fuel conduit, the fuel conduit having its outlet for fuel and'coinpressed air Within the body of tlie materiel.l

ln testimony whereof l aflx my signature.

JOHN D PUGH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3661374 *Oct 2, 1969May 9, 1972Koninklijke Hoogovens En StaalCar with a vessel for the conveying of hot substances, particularly molten pig iron
US4175731 *May 12, 1975Nov 27, 1979Overdeck John MMethod and means for utilizing waste heat of molten slag
US4739974 *Dec 4, 1986Apr 26, 1988Stemcor CorporationMobile holding furnace having metering pump
Classifications
U.S. Classification266/276, 266/287
International ClassificationC21B3/00, C21B3/10
Cooperative ClassificationC21B3/10
European ClassificationC21B3/10