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Publication numberUS1488795 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 1, 1924
Filing dateOct 27, 1920
Priority dateOct 27, 1920
Publication numberUS 1488795 A, US 1488795A, US-A-1488795, US1488795 A, US1488795A
InventorsJames Morton
Original AssigneeJames Morton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of and machine for making chenille
US 1488795 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1 1924. 1,488,795

J. MORTON METHOD OF AND MACHINE FOR MAKING cmzmmm Filed Oct. 27, 1920 a Sheets-Sheet 1 April 1-, 1924.

J. MORTON METHOD. OF AND MACHINE FOR MAKING CHENILLE Filed Oct. 27. 1920 6 Sheets Sheet 2 April 1 1924. 1,488,795 I J. MORTON METHOD OF AND MACHINE EOR MAKING CHENILLE Filed Oct. 27. 1920 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 Iz: ven ar:

Invent 0% 6 SheetsSheei 5 J. MORTON METHOD OF AND MACHINE FOR MAKING CHENILLE Filed Oct. 27

April 1 1924.

April 1 1924. 1,488,795

- J. MORTON METHOD OF AND MACHINE FOR MAKING CHENILLE Filed Oct. 27 v1*320 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 a fzz v'ent'ar:

' series of shuttles.

Patented Apr. 1, 11924.

messes JAMES MORTON, OF CABIiISLE, ENGLAND.

BEETHOD 0F AND MACHINE FOR MAKING OHENILLE. i

Application filed October 27, 1920. Serial No. 419,960.

To (LZZ whom it may concern:

Be it known that 1, JAMES MORTON, a subject of King George V of Great Britain, residing at Carlisle, county of Cumberland, England, have invented an Improvement in. Methods 01 and Machines for Making Chenille, or" which the following description, in connection with the accompanying draw ings, is a specification, like characters on the drawings representing like parts.

This invention relates to a method of and machine for making chenille.

In the manufacture of chenille Axminster rugs, the color scheme or pattern of the rug is produced by varying the coloring of the chenille threads so that when the chenille threads are woven into the rug asthe weft threads, the colored portions of each chenille thread will occupy predetermined positions in the rug to combine with adjacent portions of other chenille threads, to produce the desired pattern effect. 7 It is therefore necessary in making chenille, to vary the color-' ing of eachchenille thread or .weft by introducing differently-colored tuft-forming threads into the same. i i

It is now the common practice to produce chenille threads, the coloring of which varies in accordance with the requirement of the carpet or rug pattern, by weaving a web on a plain fiy-shuttle-looin, and then cutting this web into strips which form the chenille threads or weft. This is done by providing the loom withspaced rows of Warp threads which are shedded in the usual manner, and the tuft-formingthreads are introduced into the shed by a shuttle which lays one color in the shed for a desired number of picks, then another shuttle carrying a different kind or color of thread is substituted for the one previously in play. After a desired number of picks have been laid by the second shuttle, it is removed, and a third shuttle containing a different. kind or color of thread is substituted, and so on through a complete In weaving chenille in this manner, it is necessary for the weaver to count, the number of picks for each color Woven, and change the shuttle to introduce a new color each timea change in the color of the chenille is desired. After the web is woven in accordance with the desired pattern or color scheme, it is cut longitudinally between the rows of warp threads to form chenille or weft threads.

Other methods for producing chenille threads have also been proposed in an attempt to facilitate economy and rapidity of production. In all these prior methods, however, the pile-forming chenille threads have been manipul'ated'singly. Each pileforming threadhas required a separate cycle of operations for the machine for its introduction and union with its ing means. i V v 'The methods for producing the chenille threads above referred to have also rendered the cost almost prohibitive, since these methods are necessarily slow, and the amount of product necessarily limited. Furthermore, when chenille is produced on a loom in the manner above mentioned, the

weaver must give his entire attention to the.

operation of a singleloom; and since a very large amount of chenille is required to form the weft or lling for a single rug, the methods heretofore used to produce chenille, in addition to being'slow in effective operation, have required the use of a large number of expensive machines.

, The present invention, therefore, relates to a method of and machine for producing simultaneously a number of chenille or weft threads, all of which shall have the same color efiect. An important feature of the present method consists in selectively engaging a multiplicity of pile-forming threads simultaneously placing the threads in parallel relation; simultaneously advancing the set or multiplicity of parallel threads sidewarp or hold-.

wise to one side of the position in which they were placed, and in similarly selecting and placing successive sets or groups of threads in parallel relation to the threads previously placed. After the pile-forming threads have been selectively placed side by side, they are secured together at spaced intervals, and ar out to form chenille weft threads. The cutting operation, in accordance with the present invention, may be performed either before or after the adjacent pile-forming threadshave been secured together. An other important 'feature of the present method consists in providing the parallel pile-forming threads with rows of connecting or warp-threads extending across the pile threads at spaced intervals, and cutting the pile-fcrming threads between and securing them to the rows of warp threads.

Various forms of mechanism may be provided for carrying out the present method,

web int chenille threads.

and in the present instance of the invention this is accomplished in the following manner: A number of separate presenters are provided, each constructed to support and position any one of a number of differently colored threads; and pattern mechanism is provided t bring any one of the threads carried thereby into alignment with any one of the threads carried by the other presenters. Thread-engaging means are then operated to simultaneously engage the numerous threads that have been selected by the presenters, and these threads are drawn forward and placed in parallel relation upon a flexible conveyor. The threads upon the conveyor are then severed from their source of supply, and the conveyor is advanced sufficiently to cause the next row or multiplicity of threads to be placed alongside of the thread previously placed upon the conveyor. Connecting or warp threads are placed in spaced relation to each other upon either or both sides of the pile-forming threads, and the conveyor with the threads thereon is then wound upon a drum. In this manner a web to be converted into chenille threads is formed, of any desired length, and possessing any color efiect called for by the pattern controlled mechanism.

Two different forms of mechanism are disclosed herein for converting the chenille in one form of mechanism the chenille tufts formed by cutting the pile-forming thread between the rows of warp threads, are retained in place by twisting the warp threads to bind each chenille tuft in place as it is cut, and as the twisting operation is advanced, the chenille thus formed is wound upon spools. In the other form of mechanism, the pile-forming threads are sewed to the spaced Warp threads and then the former threads are out between the rows of warp threads to form the desired chenille.

The number of pile-forming threads that may be simultaneously placed upon the conveyor by a single operation of the present machine, may be very large-several hundred, for example-as the machine may be given any capacity deemed advisable; and since the sets or groups of threads may be placed upon the conveyor in rapid succession, the chenille web may be very rapidly produced and wound with the conveyor into a roll. The operation of securing the adjacent pile-formed threads together, in most instances, cannot be performed as rapidly as the operation of forming the chenille in web, in accordance with the present method; but since the second operation may be performed on a difi'erent machine from the first, the speed of the former operation need not be limited by the speed at which the latter operation may be performed. F urthermore, thechenille web may be given a width 1 nea /e5 sufiicient to enable a large number of chenille threads to be cut from a single web, all having the same color scheme, and from these chenille threads a number of rugs or carpets may be produced all having the same pattern.

An important feature of the present in vention resides in a number of aligned presenters each operable by pattern-control1ed means to present any one of several threads to thread-engaging means.

Another feature of the present invention esides in means for simultaneously engaging a multiplicity of selected threads, and

simultaneously placing them upon a sup threads, cutting the pile threads between the rows of warp threads, and twisting the warp threads to bind each cut thread to the 3v rp threads as the former is out.

Other features of the invention, in addi tion to the above, will be hereinafter described in connection with the accompanying drawings which show one good, practical form of means for carrying the invention into practical effect, and then the features thereof will be defined by the claims.

In the drawings Figure l is a side view of a machine for selectively engaging threads and placing them upon a conveyor, parts of the mechanism being broken away;

Fig. 2 is a sectional. View taken substantially on the line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of Fig. 1, certain parts including the conveyer, being omitted;

Fig. lis a side View of mechanism for converting the web formed upon the machine shown in Figs. 1, 2 and into round chenille;

Fig. 5 is a plan view of. Fig. 4;: Fig. 6 18 a side new of mechanism for converting the Web formed upon the machine shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, into flat or V chenille;

Fig. '7 is a plan View of Fig. 6;

Figs. 8 and 9 are fragmentary side and edge views respectively, of a pile thread box or presenter; and

Fig. 10 is a side view of cam means to be described.

4 guides 11 and 12. and upon these spaced up rights is slidably mounted a frame 13 arranged to be raised and lowered for a purpose to be described. The frame 13 8X. tending longitudinally of the'machine above the flaring base 10, serves to support the flexible conveyor 14: upon which the pile forming threads are placed.

This conveyor 14, which is preferably in the form of a relatively wide belt or apron, may be formed of canvass or other suitable material, and isarranged to extend longitudinally of the frame 13 from a let-ofi beam 15 to a take-up beam 16. The beam 15 is removably supported by the frame 13 at one end thereof by outwardly-flaring brackets 17 having notches 18 formed therein to rotatably receive the'trunnions 19 at the opposite ends of the beam 15, and the beam 16 is similarly supported at the opposite end of the frame 13 by brackets 20 having notches 21 to rotatably and removably receive the trunnions 22 of the beam 16. I

The conveyor 14 passes from the let-off beam 15 over a supporting roll 23 rotatably supported by the frame 13 adjacent one end thereof, and is then stretched lengthwise of the frame to a take-up roll 24 mounted upon the frame 13 adjacent the opposite end thereof. The conveyor passes over the roll 24 and is then wound upon the beam 16.

As above stated,an important feature of the present invention consists in selectively engaging a multiplicity of separate threads and placing them simultaneously upon a support or conveyor; and a good form of means to this end will now be described. Adjacent one edge of the conveyor 14: are slidably supported a number of boxes or presenters 25.

These boxes are supported side by side for independent movement by fixed combs or guide brackets 26 and 27 supported in spaced relation to each other by an upright 26 se cured to the base 10, the construction being such, as best shown in 8 and 9, that a number of thread-supporting shelves 28 are provided one above the other, upon one face of a strip or blade 29, and the upper end of the blade 29 is slidably supported by the upper comb 26 while the lower end is similarly supported by the lower comb The boxes or presenters 25 are made as narrow as is practical, in order that a large number may be arranged side by side lengthwise of the machine. Each box 25 is adapted to support in spaced relation a number of pile-forming threads 30 which preferably differ from each other in color,

and these threads are led one to each shelf 28 over guides 31 (Fig. 2) from a creel or other suitable source of supply, not shown. Each thread 30 is yieldingly held upon its shelf 28 by a spring 32, so that the ends of the threads protrude slightly beyond the shelves in order that they may be readily grasped. The boxes or presenters 25 are suspended by wires 33 from any suitable form of patterncontrolled mechanism now shown, and each box is automatically raised and lowered by the pattern-controlled mechanism, to bring any one of the threads carried thereby into a predetermined position. Various well known types of pattern-controlled mechanism may be provided to raise and lower the boxes as desired, and it is therefore deemed U unnecessary to illustrate mechanism for this purpose. Each box 25 may be constructed and operated to selectively position any one of a number of different threads, and in the present instance each box is shown as having eight threads, any one of which may be moved to a predetermined position where it will be grasped and placed upon the conveyor 1 1, while at the same time, each of the other boxes 25 will be similarly operated to move any one of the threads supported thereby into position to be grasped and placed simultaneously with the other threads u on the conve or in arallel relation. Y

The means for simultaneously grasping a number of threads and placing them upon the conveyor-may be variously constructed,

but in the present instance of the invention, it consists of a pair of relatively movable jaws 3d and 35 arranged to extend longitudinally of the machine frame, and these jaws are operated to move across the conveyor to grasp the multiplicity of presented threads,

draw them forward, and place them upon the 7 L moving the thread-gripping means back and forth, but in the present instance this is accomplished by providing a rack 43 slidably supported by suitable means and having one end secured to an intermediate portion of the lower jaw 34-. Reciprocating movement is imparted to the rack by a gear as meshing end of a bent arm 50. The lower end of the rack arm is pivotally secured to a boss 52 projecting laterally from the upright 12, and the arm 50 is retained in pivotal engagement with the boss 52 by cap or bolt head 53. Rocking movement is imparted to the arm 50 by a link 54 having one end pivotallysecured at 55 to the upper end of a lever 56 and its other end. movably connected to the arm 50 by means of a pin 57 and slot 58. Thelower end of the lever 56 is pivotally secured to a fixed pivot 58, and motion is imparted to the lever 56 by a slotted cam 59 secured to the main shaft 60, the lever being provided with a roller 61 operating in the cam slot 62 of the cam 59. The main shaft 60 is rotatably mounted in spaced bearings 63, 64 upon the machine base, and may be driven from any suitable means (not shown). The cam 59 is so constructed that it will cause the thread-gripping means to move forward across the conveyor, dwell an instant while in the thread'gripping position to allow the gripping mechanism time to function properly, and then move across the conveyor in the opposite direction.

It is desirable that the gripping jaws 34 and 35 should close while at the thread-engaging side of the machine, and remain closed until they are moved to the opposite side oi the machine, and should then open to release the threads. The mechanism disclosed for operating the jaws in this manner will now be described. One of the trunnions 41 of the upper jaw 35,the right-hand one in the present instance,-

extends through the ear 42 a suflicient distance to have a trigger arm 65 rigidly secured thereto, and in an upwardly-projecting position: and adjacent the trigger arm an upwardly-projecting frame 66 is provided which is carried by and rigidly secured to the lower jaw, 34. Pivotally secured to an arm of the machine frame 66 at 68, is a latch 67 which is provided with a hook 69 and a curved face 70, the hook being positioned to engage the upper end of 7 the trigger arm 65 to hold the upper jaw 35 in gripping engagement with its lower jaw. The trigger arm when released from the latch 67, is moved to the right with respect to Fig. 2, by a spring 71 having one end secured to the trigger arm, and its other end secured to a portion of the frame 66, and the latch'is moved to its operative position by a spring 72 having one end secured thereto, and the other end connected to the frame 66. As the thread-gripping jaws approach the naeepes 38. The bell crank lever 74 is pivotally se-' cured to the rigid arm 75 at 76 and the downwardly projecting arm 77 of the bell crank lever 1s positioned to rest against an adjustable screw 78 carried by the arm 7 5,.

the construction being such that the upper jaw 35 is held in its closed position until the latch 67 is lifted out of engagement with the trigger arm 65 bythe roller 73. The

position of the jaws along their path of travel at which they-will release the threads may be varied by adjusting the set screw 78,

since this varies the position of the roller 73.

The mechanism just described will retain the jaws closed until the threads have been drawn across the conveyor 14, and will then swing the upper jaw to the open position to release the threads. It is necessary to close the upper jaw to grip the threads after the grippers have been moved across the conveyor to the thread-gripping position, and for this purpose, in the present instance, a bell crank lever 79 is pivotally secured at 80 to a fixed support (not shown). The bell crank lever 79 is rocked upon its pivotal mounting by a link 82 pivotally connected at 83 to one end of this lever, and having its other end pivotally connected at 84 to one end of a bell crank lever 85. The lever 85 is pivotally mounted at 86 to a fixed pin, and the otherarm of the bell crank lever 85 is operatively connected by a link 87 to the lower end of an operating lever 88. The lever 88 has its upper end pivotally secured to a shaft 89 supported by a projection 90 upon one of thebrackets 47, and movement is imparted to the lever 88 by a cam 91 mounted upon the main shaft 60 and operatively engaging a roller 92 secured to an intermediate portion of the lever 88. The operation of the parts just described is such that after the gripping jaws have been moved into position to engage the selected threads 30 presented by the boxes 25, the bell crank lever 79 is rocked by the cam 91 so that an end 93 of this lever is moved upwardly to engage an abutment 94 upon the trigger arm 65, and in this manner the trigger arm is moved to close the jaw 35, and the trigger arm is held in this position by the latch 67 The jaws 34 and 35 are preterably provided with teeth 95 (see Fig. 3) positioned to enter each box or presenter 25 and grip the presented thread.

After one set or group of threads has been placed upon the conveyor 14 by the traveling thread grippers 34, 35, it is desirable toadvance the conveyor a distance equal to the width of the group of threads laid thereupon so that the nextset or group of threads will be laid upon a difi'erent portion of the conveyor. To this end the take-up roll 24: is provided with pins 96 positioned to engage similarly-spaced perforations formed along each edge of the conveyor, and these pins serve to positively feed the conveyor forward. In the present instance of the invention, the take-up roll 2 1 is positively but intermittently rotated through a chain of gears rotatably supported by the sliding frame 13. The take-up roll 2% has a pinion 97 secured thereto which is driven by a gear 98, and the gear 98 is driven by a pinion 99 operated by a gear 100. The gear 100 has a ratchet wheel 101 secured thereto, and rotated by a dog 102 pivotally mounted upon a rocking lever 103. The gear 100, ratchet 101 and lever 103 have the common axis 10 1, and the lever 103 is rocked to rotate the ratchet 101 by a link 105, the upper end of which has an elongated slot 106 receiving a pin 107 secured to an end of the lever 103. The slot 106 is provided to allow the frame 13 to be raised and lowered in a manner to be described. The lower end of the link 105 is pivotally connected to one end of a substantially horizontal operat ing lever 106 pivotally secured to a fixed bracket 107 and provided with a roller 108 engaging a cam 109 secured to the main shaft 60. The cam 109 is constructed to rotate the take-up roll 24 through the mechanism just described, so that the conveyor after one group of threads has been placed thereon, will be moved forward just far enough to have the next group of threads laid upon the conveyor alongside the threads previously placed thereon, so that the space between successive sets or groups of threads will be the same as the space between any two adjacent threads. As the conveyor is fed forward by the take-up roll 24%, it is wound upon the take-up beam 16, the beam being rotated by any suitable mechanism (not shown).

It is desirable that the grippers should be moved toward the thread-gripping position while the conveyor is being advances, and in order that these two operations may be carried on at the same time, means is provided for lowering the conveyor after a set of threads has been placed thereon so that the grippers during their forward move ment will not disturb the threads upon the conveyor, and after theconveyor has been advanced a predetermined amount, it is raised to receive the next set of threads. To this end the frame 13 which supports the conveyor, is periodically raised and lowered.

' This is accom lished, b rovidin the frame P y P e 13 with bearings 110 which slidably engage the opposite edges of the uprights 11 and 12, adjustable screws 111 and gibs 112 preferably being provided to take up wear between these parts The! frame 13 intermediate its ends is provided with a bridgemember 113 to which the mechanism for raising and lowering the frame is connected. In the present instance the frame 13 is raised and lowered by a lever 11 1 having its intermediate portion pivotally supported by a fixed pivot 115 supported by a bracket 115 and one end of this lever is operatively connected to the bridge member 113 by a link 116 while the other end of the lever 11 i is provided with a roller 117 resting against a cam 118 secured to the main shaft 60.

After a group of threads has been drawn forward a desired distance they should be severed from their source of supply, and to this end, in the present instance of the invention, a pair of knives 119, 120 are provided extending lengthwise of the machine and adjacent the row of presenters 25. These knives are operatively supported by and are secured to'the outer ends of pivoted arms 121 and 122. The arms 121 are pivotally connected at 123 to a fixed bracket 121 while the arms 122 are ivotally connected to this bracket at 125. ovement is imparted to the arms 121 and 122 to move the knives to and from the cutting position by links 126 and 127. The link 126 is connected to one of the arms 121 between the knife 119 and the pivot 123, while the link 127 is connected toan extension 128 projecting rearwardly beyond the pivot 125 of the arm 122. The lower ends of the links 126 and 127 are connected to one end of a bell crank lever 129 pivotally supported by the machine base at 130, and the other end of this lever is connected to a lever 131 by a link 132. The upper end of the lever 131 is connected to the fixed shaft 89, and movement is imparted to the parts just described by a cam 133 secured to the main shaft 60, a roller 13 1 being carried by the lever 131 in engagement with the cam 133. The knives 119 and 120 are normally held in spaced relation to each other by springs 135 and 136.

It is desirable to provide means extending across the parallel pile threads upon the conveyor to retain these threads in place while the conveyor with the threads thereon is wound upon the take-up beam 16. To this end, in the present instance of the invention, a beam 13'. is rotatably supported above the conveyor at the take-up end of the machine by, the frame 138, and upon this beam are wound warp or binding threads 139. The threads are preferably spaced from each other a distance equal to the length of the tufts into which the threads 30 are to be cut, and the warp threads 139 are led from this beam 137 about the rounded edge of the guide bar 1 10 and then over th pile threads upon the conveyor, and are wound up with the conveyor on the beam 16. The guide bar1 10 is preferably provide d with notches 141 (Fig. 3) to receive the warp threads, and this bar, in addition to guiding the warp threads, serves to hold the pile threads adjacent the same in place while the next set of pile threads is being placed on the conveyor. One thread of the set, which is being laid upon the conveyor, is placed very close to the marginal thread laid thereupon in the preceding operation, and to prevent the latter thread from being disturbed during the placing of the marginal threads of the next set alongside it, the guide bar 137 is constructed to rest upon the last several thread or several threads upon the l conveyor, while the next set of threads is being placed thereon. To this end the guide bar 140 is supported to be raised and lowered out of and into engagement with the threads upon the conveyor, and in the present instance the bar 137 is provided with spaced arms 142 (Fig. 3) carried by a rocking shaft 143, the ends of which are supported by bracle' ets 144 projecting upwardly from the brackets 20 upon the frame 13. One of the arms 142' projects rearwardly as at 145, and has operatively secured thereto a link 146, said link being provided with a slot 147 to form a loose connection with the pin 148 of the arm 145, to allow for the raising and lowering. of the frame 13. Motion is imparted to the link 146 by a cam 149 secured to the main shaft 60, and operating to rock a lever 150 having one end connected to. the link 146 and the other end pivotally connected to the fixed bracket 151,.the lever 150 being provided with a roller 152.resting against the cam 149. The parts just described operate to hold th guide bar 140 raised out of engagement with the pile threads upon the conveyor while the latter is being moved forward, but hold the guide bar in engagement with the pile threads while a new set of threads is being laid upon the conveyor.

The operation of the machine shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 is as follows: While the grippers are moving toward the thread-grip ping position, the boxes or presenters 25 are independently shifted by the pattern-conrolled mechanism so that each box is moved to bring a particular colored thread into position to be gripped. Upon the grippers being moved into gripping position, the lever 79 is operated to engage the trigger arm 65 and move it to close the jaw 35 to grip the thread ends aligned by the boxes or presenters 25. The grippers are then moved across the conveyor, and draw forward simultaneously a large number of selected pile threads (several hundred threads, for example) forming a broad ribbon or web. By the time the grippers have moved to approximately their greatest distance from the presenters, the conveyor has moved the threads thereupon to one side of the path of travel of the grippers, and the frame 13 has been raised to bring the conveyor ap proximately into engagement with the threads 30 being drawn across the same. The knives 119 and 120 will then cut the threads 30 and the grippers will move a slight distance further to place the threads properly upon the conveyor clear of the knives, and will then open and continue their movement outward or away from the presenters until the grippers are moved clear of the threads they have just released.

If the web formed on the machine just described is to be made into round chenille by twisting the warp threads to bind the chenille tufts in place, it is desirable to place the warp threads both above and below the pile threads, and this may be accomplished by supplying a second group of warp threads similar to the threads 139. To this end a reed 153 is provided at the righthand end of the machine (see Fig. 1) through which the lower warp threads 154 are led from any suitable source, not shown. The threads 154 are led under a guide-bar 155 and along the upper face of the conveyor so that the pile-forming threads 30 will be laid across the threads 154. If the Web formed upon the machine shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 is to have the pile threads sewed in place, the under warp threads 154 may be omitted.

After a web of the desired length is formed into a roll in the manner above-explained, this web is then ready to be con verted into strips of chenille having the desired color effect, and this may be performed in difierent ways. If round chenille is desired, the same may be satisfactorily produced upon the mechanism shown in Figs. 4 and 5, and if flat or V chenille is desired, the same may be produced by the mechanism shown in Figs. 6 and 7.

Referring now more particularly to Figs. 4'and 5: The take-up beam 16 (Fig. 1) with the desired amount of web and its supporting conveyor 14 wound thereon, is removed from the beam supporting means shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, and is placed upon the frame shown in Figs. 4 and 5, in position to have the conveyor unwound, and the chenille-forming web removed from the conveyor. To this end the supporting frame shown in Figs. 4 and 5 may be given any suitable construction, and in the present instance consists of end frames 156 and 157 connected'by side rails 158 and 159. The end frame 156 at the left hand end of the supporting frame is provided with notched brackets 160 for re movably receiving the trunnions 161 of a beam 162 having the conveyor 14 and the web formed on the machine shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 wound thereon. The beam 162 is preferably provided with brake mechanism consisting of a brake band 163 passing about a pulley 163 secured to the beam 162,

LEG

one end of the band being secured to the frame at 164 while the other end is secured to a weighted lever 165. The conveyor is led from the beam 162 to a roll 166 rotatably supported by the side rails 158. The

a roll 166 is similar to the roll 24, and is provided with pins 167 engaging spaced perforations 168 5) "formed in the marginal portions of the conveyor. The conveyor is retained in operative engagement with the roll 166 by a floating roll 169 slidably supported by the brackets 170 and urged toward the roll. 166 by springs 171. The conveyor passes about the roll 166 and is then led to a second beam 17 2 removably and rotatably supportedupon the frame by slotted brackets 173. Here the conveyor is wound up, ready to be again used upon the machine shown in Fig. 1, the beam 172 being rotated by suitable means, not shown. The upper and lower rows of warp threads 139 and 154 serve to strip the pile-forming threads from the conveyor as will be apparent from Fig. 4, and these warp threads with the pile-forming threads 31) therebetween, are passed over a roller 174 rotatably supported by the rails 158, and operatively connected to the roll 166 by gears 175,

17 6 and 177. As the pile-forming web is passed about the roll 174, a drum 178 provided with spaced rotating knives 179 operates to cut the pile-forming threads 30 between the spaced rows of warp threads, and each row of Warp threads consisting of an upper thread 139 and lower thread 154 with the tufts of threads 180 held therebetween, is led to thread-twisting and wind ing mechanism. The cutting drum 17 8 is driven at the desired rate of speed by means (not shown).

The means shown in the present instance of the invention for twisting the warp threadsto thereby bind the tuft threads 180 in place, consists of fly frames 181 mounted upon and rotated by spindles 182 rotatably supported by the side rails 159 and driven by pulleys or whirls 188. One of the arms 184 of the fly frames is preferably provided at its lower end with the usual presser finger 185 and the two warp threads. forming one row in the web, are led through the eye 181 at the top of a flyer, down the arm 184 and along the presser finger 185 to the spool 186 carried by a spindle 182 and frictionally driven by the spindle.

Before starting the mechanism shown in Figs. 4 and 5, each row of warp threads is threaded through the flyer 181 and is secured to the take-up spool186, and preferably enough twists are placed in the portion of each row of warp threads extending between its flyer and the pointwhere the pile threads 30 are cut, to cause each tuft 180 to be bound in place by a twist at substantially the instant its pile-formed thread is out by the knives 179. The mechanism may then be started, whereupon each row of warp threads will be properly twisted to bind the chenille tufts 180 in place as they are cut, and as the chenille is formed it is wound upon the spools 186 in a well known manner. 1 It will therefore be seen that the web formed on the machine shownin Figs. 1, 2 and 3 may be rapidly converted upon the mechanism shown in Figs. 4and 5, into a number of round chenille threads each having the same color effect.

Should it be desirableto convert the web formed. upon the machine shown in Fig. 1

into chenille with the tuft threads sewed in place, this may be accomplished by the mechanism shown in Figs. 6 and 7, and as a result, flat or V chenille will be produced. In the embodiment of the inventionillustrated in Figs. 6 and 7, the supporting frame is provided with suitable end frames 187 and 188 connected by side frames 189 and 190. The beam 191 carrying the conveyor 14 with the chenille web thereon, is reinovably and rotatably mounted in notches 192 in the end frame 187, and this beam is preferably provided with suitable brake mechanism as shown. The conveyor is led from the beam 191 over a roll 193 similar to the roll 166 shown in Figs. 4 and 5, and is then wound on a take-up beam 194 driven by any suitable means. I

As the conveyor 14 passes about the roll 193, the pile-forming threads 30 are stripped therefrom by the stripper 195, and the web of chenille-forming threads is passed along a table 196 where it is sewed at spaced intervals by a number of sewing machines 197. To insure the proper feeding of the web along the table 196, belts 198 are preferably provided adjacent the opposite ends of the threads 80, and are driven at the same rate of speed as the conveyor belt. The belts 198 in the present instance of the invention, pass about spaced drums or pulleys 199 and 200. After the web has passed the first transverse row of sewing machines 197, the stitches formed by these niachines will retain the threads in place while they are being passed further along the table 196. The sewing machines are preferably of the lock-stitch type, and are positioned in staggered relation as best shown in Fig. 7 and the machines are so arranged that the pileforming threads 30 of the web will be sewed at equally-spaced intervals to form rows of stitches 201.-

These stitches preferablybind the warp threads 139 to the pile-forming threads 30. The sewing machines may be given any suitable construction, but in the embodiment shown, each horizontal row of machines is operated from, a transversely-extending shaft 202 provided with eccentrics 203 for raising and lowering the needles 197. The shafts 202 by means of bevel gears, are driven from a shaft 204- whichmay be operated from a gear 205 by a dwell and feed worm 205. The shuttles beneath the work to be sewed, and the mechanism for operating the same, are not shown, since this forms no part of the present invention. The entire group of sewing machines is preferably moved back and forth slightly laterally of the work to cause the stitches 201 to zigzag slightly to better bind the warp threads to the pile-forming threads. As the web passes out from under the set of sewing machines, it passes about a roll 207 driven by a gear 208 meshing with a gear 206, and the sewed web may be cut into chenille threads as it passes over the roll 20?, by cutters, not shown, or it -may be led from the roll in an uncut condition to the take-up beam 209 and wound up upon this beam. The belts 198 may be driven from the shaft or" the gear 206 by a sprocket chain 210, and strippers 211 are preferably provided to strip the web from the belts 198 as they travel around the pulleys 200.

From the foregoing description, it will be apparent that a large n mber of chenille threads each having "he same color effect, may be produced rapidly by the method herein set forth, and it will be apparent that the present method is admirably adapted to produce rapidly the chenille from which a number of duplicate rugs or carpets are to be made.

What is claimed is 1. The method of producing a web to be cut into chenille threads, which consists in selectively engaging a multiplicity of dis similar pile forming threads in accordance with a predetermined color scheme, simultaneously placing said threads in parallel relation, simultaneously advancing said set or multiplicity of parallel tireads sidewise a distance equal to the width of the set of parallel threads, similarly selecting other threads in accordance with a different color scheme and placing successive sets or multiplicity of said threads in parallel relation, and securing the placed threads together at spaced intervals along the threads.

2. The method of producing a web to be cut into chenille threads, which consists in selectively engaging a multiplicity of pile forming threads, simultaneously placing said threads in parallel relation, simultaneously advancing said set or multiplicity of parallel threads sidewise in the plane in which they he a distance equal to the width of the set of parallel threads, similarly selecting other and dissimilar threads and placing successive sets or multiplicity of saidthreads in parallel relation, and securing the sets of threads to longitudinal threads.

3. The method of producing a web to be cut into chenille threads, which consists in selecting dissimilar pile forming threads in accordance with the requirements of a pre' determined design and simultaneously placing a multiplicity of these separate threads crosswise of a support and in parallel relation to each other, advancingsaid threads to a position to one side of the position in which they were placed upon the support, similarly selecting other pile forming threads in accordance with a different design and placing simultaneously a second set or multiplicity of said threads upon the support alongside of the threads previously placed on the support, with the first thread in one set lying alongside the last thread in the next set and securing the sets of parallel threads to spaced longitudinal threads.

4:. The method of producing a web to be cut into chenille threads, which consists in simultaneously placing a multiplicity of separate pile forming threads upon aflexible conveyor in parallel relation to each other, advancing the conveyor sufficiently to move the threads to one side of the position where they were placed upon the conveyor, similarly placing successive sets or multiplicity of threads upon the conveyor alongside of the threads previously placed thereon, with the first thread in one set lying alongside the last thread in another set and winding said conveyor with the threads thereon into a roll.

5. The method of producing a web to be cut into chenille threads, which consists in simultaneously placing a multiplicity of separate pile forming threads upon a conveyor in parallel relation to each other, advancing the conveyor sufliciently to move the threads to one side of the position where they were placed upon the conveyor, similarly placing successive sets or multiplicity of threads upon the conveyor alongside of the threads previously placed thereon, with the first thread of one set lying alongside the last thread of another set and introducing spaced threads crosswise of the parallel threads so that the spaced threads are positioned upon the same side of all the parallel threads.

6. The method of producing a web to be cut into chenille threads, which consists in selectively moving a multiplicity of separate pile forming threads into position to be grasped, simultaneously grasping the positioned threads and placing them upon a support, severing said threads from their source of supply, advancing said threads to one side of the position in which they were placed on the support, and selecting other threads and similarly placing successive sets or multiplicity of said threads upon the threads so that the warp threads remain support alongside of the threads previously placed thereon.

7. The method of producing a web to be cut into chenille threads, which consistsin simultaneously grasping a multiplicity of separate pile forming threads and placing the same crosswise of a support in parallel relation to each other, lowering the support and threads out of the position in which the threads are placed upon the support, advancing the lowered threads to a position to one side of the position in which they were placed upon the support, raising the support, and similarly placing successive sets or multiplicity of threads upon thesupport and alongside of the threads previously placed thereupon.

8. The method of producing a web to be cut into chenille threads, which consists in providing an intermittently moved thread support, selectively placing simultaneously a multiplicity of separate threads upon the support in parallel relation to each other, advancing the support with the separate parallel threads thereupon a predetermined distance, and simultaneously placing in a similar manner another set or multiplicity of threads upon the support and alongside of the threads previously placed thereupon to form the threads of the successive sets in a single row.

9. The method of producing chenille, which consists in forming a web consisting of a multiplicity of parallel pile forming threads having spaced rows of warp threads extending across the pile forming threads, cutting said web between the spaced rows of warp threads to form chenille tufts between the warp threads, and simultaneously twisting each row of warp threads to bind the chenille tufts in place and winding up the warp'threads continuously as they are twisted.

10. The method of producing chenille, which consists in forming a web consisting of a multiplicity of different pile forming threads arranged side by side in parallel relation and having spaced rows of warp threads extending across the pile forming threads, cutting said webbetween the spaced rows of Warp threads to form chenille tufts between the warp threads, and binding the chenille tufts between the warp threads by imparting twists to the leading portion of each roW of warp threads during the cutting operation.

11. The method of producing chenille, which consists in simultaneously placing in parallel relation a multiplicity of separate pile forming threads, providing spaced rows of warp threads across the pile forming throughout their length upon the same side of the multiplicityof threads, and cutting the pile forming threads between the rows of Warp threads and securing them to the warp threads.

12. The method of producing chenille, which consists in selectively placing a multiplicity of separate pile forming threads simultaneously in parallel relation to each other, providing spaced rows of warp threads extending across the pile forming threads and upon opposite sides of the same, cutting the pile forming threads between the spaced rows of warp threads, and binding the cut threads between the adjacent warp threads by imparting twists to the leading portion of each row of warp threads during the cutting operation.

13. In a machine of the class described, the combination of means for supporting a multiplicity of separate pile forming threads in a row, a traveling support for sustaining the pile forming threads temporarily, means for engaging and simultaneously placing the threads upon the support ina row across the support, means for advancing the support to move said threads to one side of the position in which they are placed upon the support, said thread engaging means operable to successively place one set or multiplicity of pile forming threads upon the support after each preceding set or multiplicity of pile forming threads. are moved to one side of the position in which the same were placed upon the support.

14:. In a machine of the class described, the combination of thread engaging means,

means for supporting amultiplicity of sepa-- rate pile forming threads in a predetermined position, a support for sustaining the pile-forming threads temporarily, said thread engaging means operable to engage a multiplicity of said threads and simultaneously place them upon the support, means for moving the threads to one side of the position where they are laid upon the support, said thread engaging means operable to successively place one set or multiplicity of pile forming threads after the other upon said suppo'rt,and means for lowering said support periodically to clear the moving thread engaging means.

15. In a machine of the class described, the combination of thread holding means, a flexible conveyor for temporarily supporting threads, means for simultaneously placing a multiplicity of separate threads upon sald conveyor, means for moving said conveyor sufliciently to carry the threads there on to one side of the position where they are placed on the conveyor, said thread placing means operable to successively place sets or groups of threads upon the conveyor, means for removably holding said threads in 'place upon the conveyor, and means for winding the conveyor with the threads thereupon into a roll.

16. In a machine of the class described, the combination of thread holding means, a conveyor for temporarily supporting threads, means for selectively engaging a multiplicity of threads and movable across the conveyor to lay the selected threads thereupon in parallel relation, means for moving said conveyor forward suiiiciently to carry the threads thereupon to one side or" the position in which they are laid by the thread laying means, said thread laying means operable to successively place sets or groups of threads upon the conveyor, and means for periodically lowering the conveyor out of the path of'travel of the laying means. r

17. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a multiplicity of threads presenters mounted side-by-side, each presenter movable to any one of several predetermined positions to present any one of several different threads, a conveyor, means for simultaneously engaging a multiplicity of presented threads and placing them upon the conveyor, and means for moving the conveyor forward s'utficiently to move the threads thereupon to one side of the path of travel of the thread placing means, said thread placing means operable successively to engage the selected threads and place them in sets or groups upon the conveyor.

18. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a multiplicity of presenters arranged in alignment and separately movable to bring any one of several threads to a predetermined position, pattern controlled means for selectively positioning the presenters simultaneously, a support, and means for simultaneously engaging the multiplicity of presented threads and placing them side-by-side upon said support.

19. In a machine of the class described, means for supportinga multiplicity of setsof pile forming threads, means for selectively presenting any one of a set o'f threads in position of alignment with any one of the threads of the other sets, a support having an extended surface, and means operable to engage the aligned threads and place the threads simultaneously across said support in parallel relation to each other.

20. In a machine of the class described, means for supporting a multiplicity of threads, means for selectively adjusting said threads tobring a multiplicity of different threads into alignment, a support having an extended surface, means operable to engage the aligned threads and simultaneously place them side-.by-side acrossfsaid support, and means operable to move "one set 0? multis plicity of threads placed eiu'pon the Support to one side of the path of movement of the thread placing means while the thread placing means operates to engage the neat lot or multiplicity of aligned threads.

21. In a machineof the class described, means for supporting a multiplicity of threads, means for selectively adjusting said threads to bring a multiplicity of different threads into alignment, a support having an extended surface, means operable to engage the aligned threads and simultaneously place them side-by-side across said support, and means operable to move the placed threads laterally, said thread placing means operable to place a second lot or multiplicity of threads upon the support along side of the threads previously placed thereupon.

22. In a machine of the class described, means for supporting a multiplicity 01 threads, means for selectively adjusting said threads to bring a multiplicity of difierent threads into alignment, a support having an extended surface, gripping means operable to engage the aligned threads and simultaneously place them side-by-side across said support, means for severing the placed threads from their source of supply, and means operable to move the placed threads laterally, said thread placing means operable to place a second set'or multiplicity of threads upon the support along side of the threads previously placed thereon. V

23. In a machine-of the class described, means tor supporting a multiplicity of threads, means for selectively adjusting said threads to bring a multiplicity of different threads into alignment, a conveyor, gripping means operable to engage the aligned threads and place them simultaneously across the conveyor, means for feeding the conveyor forward a predetermined amount, said'gripping means operable to place successive lots or multiplicity of threads upon the conveyor and along side of the threads previously placed thereon, and means for raising and lowering the conveyor in timed relation with the operation of the gripping means. 7

2a. In a machine of the class described, a flexible conveyor for temporarily supporting threads, means for placing separate and unconnected threads side-by-side across the conveyor, means for laying retaining threads across the upper face of the threads upon prcvidedwith relatively movable jaws, latch mean lfor hc dine ai-d jaws c os d, d fix d means positioned to be struck by the latch to release the latter as the thread gripping means approaches the end of its path of travel.

26. In a machine of the class described,

a flexible apron for supporting and advancing' a web consisting of transversely extending pile forming threads having spaced rows of warp threads extending across the opposite sides of the pile forming threads, means for cutting the pile forming threads between said spaced rows to form chenille tufts between the warp threads, and means for simultaneously twisting and winding up each row of warp threads during the cutting operation. 7

27. In a machine of the class described, means for selectively positioning different pile "forming threads side by side for supplying warp threads to the pile forming threads to form a web consisting of diiferent transversely extending pile forming threads having spaced rows of warp threads extending across the opposite sides of the pile forming threads, means for cutting the pile forming threads between said spaced rows to form chenille tufts between the warp threads, and means for twisting the leading portion of each row of warp threads simultaneously with the cutting operation.

28. In a machine of the class described, means for supporting a web in the form of a wide flat sheet, and consisting of different transversely extending pile forming threads having spaced rows of warp threads extending across the opposite sides of the pile forming threads, means for cutting the pile forming threads between said spaced rows to form chenille tufts between the warp threads, and means for applying a twist to the warp threads at the point where the pile forming threads are cut to thereby bind each thread in place as it is cut.

29. In a machine of the class described, a beam for supporting a web consisting of transversely extending pile forming threads having spaced rows of warp threads extending across the opposite sides of the pile forming threads, means for unwinding the web from the beam and for cutting the pile forming threads between said spaced rows to form chenille tufts between the Warp threads, means for applying a twist to the warp threads at the point where the pile forming threads are cut to bind each thread in place as it is cut, and means for winding up the leading portion of each row of warp threads during the cutting and twisting operation.

30. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a support for sustaining the pile forming threads temporarily, means for simultaneously placing a multiplicity of pile forming threads side-by-side upon the support, means for placing spaced rows of warp threads across the pile forming threads, and means for cutting the pile forming threads between and securing them to the rows of warp threads.

31. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a support, means for simultaneously placing a multiplicity of pile forming threads side-by-side upon the support, means for simultaneously advancing the set or multiplicity of threads upon the support sidewise a distance equal to the width of the set of threads, said placing means operable to successively place sets or multiplicity of threads upon the support along side of the threads previously placed thereon, with the first thread of one set positioned along side the last thread of another set, means for placing spaced rows of warp threads across the pile forming threads, and means for cutting the pile forming threads between and securing them to the rows of warp threads.

82. In a machine of the class described, the combination of means for supporting warp threads, means for automatically selecting different pile forming threads and for placing them between the warp threads, and means for twisting the leading portion of the warp threads while the trailing portion thereof is held against rotation, to thereby bind the pile forming threads be tween the warp threads.

33. In a machine of the class described, the combination of means for supporting warp threads, means for automatically selecting different pile forming threads and for placing them between the warp threads, and means for simultaneously twisting and winding up the leading portion of the warp threads while the trailing portion thereof is held against rotation, to thereby bind the .pile forming threads between the warp threads.

34E. In a machine of the class described, the combination of means for selecting a multiplicity of different threads in accordance with a predetermined design and supporting the selected threads in a row, a support, means for simultaneously placing the set or multiplicity of selected threads upon the support, and means for advancing the set of threads on the support to one side of the position where they are placed so that successive sets of threads may be selected and placed upon the support along side the preceding set placed thereupon.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification.

JAMES MORTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3058193 *May 26, 1958Oct 16, 1962Tullmaschb Karl Marx Stadt VebProcess for the manufacture of chenille yarn
US3142885 *Feb 2, 1962Aug 4, 1964Leon Capel & Sons Inc AMethod of manufacturing multi-color, chenille yarn, braid and fabrics, and products manufactured by said method
US5259178 *Aug 28, 1992Nov 9, 1993Giuliano SostegniMachine for making chenille yarns
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/24, 28/170, 28/144
International ClassificationD04D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04D3/00
European ClassificationD04D3/00