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Publication numberUS1492190 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 29, 1924
Filing dateMay 31, 1922
Priority dateMay 31, 1922
Publication numberUS 1492190 A, US 1492190A, US-A-1492190, US1492190 A, US1492190A
InventorsAycock William E
Original AssigneeAycock Wood Brick Veneer Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Weatherboarding
US 1492190 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 29, 1924. 1,492,190

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Eli. E. A'YCOCK, OF HOULTRIE, GEORGIA, ASSIGNOR TO AYCOOK WOOD-ERICK VENEER 00., 0F EOULTRIE, GEORGIA, A CORPORATION OF FLO rnnanomc.

Application filed May 31, 1922. Serial No. 584,797.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that 1, WILLIAM E. ArcocK, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Moultrie, Georgia, have invented new and useful Improvements in Weatherboarding, which are fully set forth in the'following specification.

This invention relates to an improved weatherboarding or siding for use in buildings, and has for its ob ect the provision of weather-boarding or siding which may be readily applied to produce a weathertight joint and present a finished and attractive appearance.

A further object is to provide a weatherboarding or siding which, when applied on the building and properly painted, shall present 'the appearance of a brick wall, preferably with rake joints.

The present invention is an improvement on Patent No. 1,171,081, granted to me F ebruary 8, 1916, in which the weather-board is of uniform cross-section from edge to edge, and one of the objects of the present invention is to secure all of the benefits and advantages set forth in my said patent while economizing in the amount of lumber employed in producing the siding, to the end that the first cost of the siding may be reduced and the freight also materially reduced owing to the decreased bulk and weight of the siding.

By means of the present invention I am enabled to form two weather boards or strips of siding from a proximately the same amount of lumber t at was required to form one weather-board or strip of siding of the construction shown and-described in my said patent, while retaining all the advantages of said construction. In the manufacture of the sidin of my present invention, I take a strip of umber, preferably one inch in thickness and four inches in width, and with a suitable band-saw I divide this strip longitudinally into two strips of uniform dimensions, each of said str1ps being approximately one-third of an inch thick on its thinner edge and two-thirds of an inch on 1ts thicker edge. These strips of weather-boarding are designed to be applied to the wall with the thin edge downward and the thick edge upward. In the upper edge of the strip of siding and on the outer face thereof are formed two lon itudinally extending rabbets, one above e other. Each of the rabbets has a base or bottom portion which, when the siding is applied in position on the wall, is approximately horizontal both in longitudinal and transverse directions. The face of the lower rabbet is parallel with the outer face of the weather-board, and, when the latter is a plied in position on the wall, is substantial y vertical. The' face of the upper rabbet is inclined inward or away from the front face of the weather-board. Preferably, the vertical measurement of the lower rabbet is approximately that of the vertical measurement of a rake joint in a brick wall, while its horizontal depth is approximately the depth of the ordinary rake joint. The vertical measurement of the upper or inwardly inclined rabbet may be of any desired extent, preferably, however, being suflicient to afiord ample room for lap of the next superposed strip of siding and for nailing. The base of the upper rabbet in its transverse measurement is such that, when added to the depth or transverse measurement of the lower rabbet, it will exactly equal the thicknes of the lower ed e of the strip of siding. Vertically exten ing grooves, corresponding in width and depth with the dimensions of the lower rabbet, are formed in the face of the stri of weather-board to simulate the vertica rake joints in brickwork.

One form of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a perspective view showing strips ofweather-boarding in place in a we Fig. 2 is a sectional perspective view throu 11 art of a wall showing my improve si ing in position;

Fi 3 is an end elevation of a board,- showmg how the same is divided to form two weather-boards; and

Fig. 4 is a similar view of one of the weather-boards, the material cut away to form the same being indicated in dot and dash lines.

Referring to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals indicate like parts throughout the several views, 1 indicates a board divided longitudinally by any suitable saw, such as a band-saw, into two pieces 2 and 3 of uniform dimensions from which are formed the strips of weather-boarding 4. The kerf made by the saw extends diagonally through the board in such manner that each piece or strip shall have an approximate thickness of one-third of an inch at one edge and two-thirds of an inch at the opposite ed The si e of the strip along the diagonal cut forms the rear face of the board and the opposite side the front face. Each weatherboard or strip of siding is provided on the front face of its thicker edge portion with two longitudinally extending rabbets 5 and 6, one above the other. The lower rabbet 5 is provided with a horizontal bottom 7 and a vertical face 8. The upper rabbet is provided with a horizontal bottom 9 and a rearwardly inclined face 10. The inclined rear face 11 of each weather-board terminates at the thicker edge of the board in a surface 12 parallel with the front face of the board.

In applying the weather-boards to the wall, they may be applied in any usual way, either directly to the studding or, preferably and as here shown in Fig. 2, the weather-board is secured to the sheathing 13 and when inposition, whether as ap lied to the sheathing or directly to the studding, the weather-boarding is applied with the rabbeted thicker portion uppermost and the beveled portion 12 (which is parallel with the front face 4 ofthe board) resting against the sheathing or against the interposed building-paper 17 and the lower thinner edge of each board resting on the bottom 9 of the rabbet 6 of the board immediately below and nailed through such thin edge and the upper edge of the lower board. The thinner lower edge of the first board is received in a rabbet 14 of a water table 15 suitably secured to the sheathing at the desired height from the ground. Since the combined depths of the rabbets 5 and 6 are equal to the thickness of the weather-board at its lower edge, it follows that the overhang at the lower edge of each board is exactly equal to the distance from the front face of the weather-board to the face 8 of the rabbet 5, so that there is formed a longitudinal groove of uniform de th at. top and bottom and ofv a height equa to the height of the face 8 of the rabbet 5.

Each of the boards is provided withequally spaced vertical ooves, the spacing being preferably approximately equal to the length of a brick, said vertical grooves being of the same dimensions as the longitudina grooves formed by the rabbet 5 and the overang of the board immediately above. The result is that, when the weather-boards are in place, the wall has'the'appearancesho n in ig. 1, that is the appearance of a brick wall with rake joints; and when the faces of the weather-boards are properly painted (and preferably sanded) and t e grooves in imitation of rake joints are also properly painte the wall has the appearance of a well formed brick wall with rake 'oints.

Since the bevel face 12, Fig. 4. is parallel with the front face 4 of the weather-board, and since the face 10 of the rabbet 6 is rallel with the rear face of the weatheroard, it follows that the front faces of all of the weather-boards will lie in the same vertical plane and that the lower thinner edge of each board will fit sn ly so as to make a weather-tight joint in t e rabbet 10. When s eathing and building-paper are employed as shown in Fig. 2 and the weather-boards are in place as shown in said figure, there will be formed dead-air spaces 16 which serve to make the building warmer in winter and cooler in summer, since such dead-air spaces form an effective insulation.

The invention may be embodied in a variety of mechanicalforms, and reference is therefore to be had to the claims hereto appended for a definition of the limits of the invention. I

What is claimed is 1. A weather-board uniformly increasing in cross-section from one ed e toward the other and having two longitu inally extending rabbets in its thicker edge portion, each of said rabbets having a bottom at right angles to the front face of the board and one of said rabbets having a face parallel with said front face while the other rabbet has a face inclined therefrom.

'2. A weather-board uniformly increasing in cross-section from one ed e toward the other and having two longituifinally extending rabbets in its thicker edge portion, each of said rabbets having a bottom at right angles to the front face of the board and one .of said rabbets having a face parallel with said front face while the other rabbet has an inclined face, the combined bottoms of said rabbets being substantially e ual to the thickness of the board at its t inner edge.

3. A weather-board uniformly increasing in cross-section from one ed e toward the other and havingl two longitu inally extending rabbets in t e front face of its thicker edgg portion, each of said rabbets having a ttom at right. angles to the front face of the board and a face ortion, the face of one rabbet havi a sur ace arallel with the front face of t e board w ile the face of the other rabbet has a surface parallel to the rear face of the board.

4. A weather-board which when in 'tion on a vertical wall has a vertical face and an inclined rear face, said board being provided with two rabbets in the outer face of its upper edge portion, each of said rabbets having a substantially horizontal bottom, the ower rabbet having a face parallel with the front face of the board and the upper rabbet having a face arlalel with the said. rear face of the 0a Y 5. A weather-board which when in posiont 1 aeearao tion on a vertical wall has a vertical front face and an upwardly and rearwardly inclined rear face, whereby the lower portion of the board is the thinner, and two longitudinally extending rabbets in the front face of? the upper edge portion, the combined bottoms of the two rabbets being equal to the thickness of the board at its lower edge.

6. A wall' comprising a plurality of boards each increasing in cross-section from its lower edge upward, each board being provided in the front face of its upper edge portion with two longitudinally extending rabbets one above the other, the lower edge of each board being received in. the upper rabbet of the adjacent board, said boards presenting vertical front faces and being provided with inclined rear faces.

7. A. wall comprising a plurality of boards, each increasing in cross-section from the lower edge thereof upward, each board being provided in the front face of its u per edge portion with a lower rabbet, an an upper rabbet having a rearwardly inclined wall, the thin edge of each board being received in the-upper rabbet of the adjacent board, said boards presenting vertical front faces, separated by the lower rabbets, each of said boards having an inclined rear face. 8. A wall includingJ in combination a plurality of sheathing cards in direct edge to edge contact and a plurality of weatherboards secured to said. sheathing boards, each of said weather-boards increasing in as cross-section from the lower edge thereof &

upward, the upper edge of each weatherboard being rovided with two longitudinally exten ing rabbets one above the other, the lower edge of each board being received in the u per rabbet of the adjacent board, said boar s having inclined rear surfaces providing with the sheathing a plurality of insulating cells, said weatherboards presenting vertical front faces separated by said lower rabbets and simulating the appearance of a brick wall.

9. A Weather-board uniformly increasing in cross-section from one edge toward the other, said weather-board having two lon gitudinally extending rabbets in its thicker edge portion and a series of transverse rooves extending across one face of the oard, each of said grooves havin the same width and depth as one of said ra bets.

10. A wall comprising a plurality of boards, each increasing in cross-section from the lower edge thereof upward, each board being provided in its upper edge with two longitudinally extending rabbets one above the other and each board having a series of transverse ooves extending across the front face t ereof, the lower edge of each board being received in. the upper rabbet of the ad'acent board, said boards presenting vertica front faces all in the same plane and separated by the lower rabbets and said grooves.

In testimony specification.

WILLIAM E. AYCGCK.

whereof I have signed this

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7748189 *May 27, 2005Jul 6, 2010Cosmic Garden Co., Ltd.Tile and tack therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/535, D25/119
International ClassificationE04F13/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0864
European ClassificationE04F13/08D