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Publication numberUS1492514 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 29, 1924
Filing dateFeb 18, 1920
Priority dateFeb 18, 1920
Publication numberUS 1492514 A, US 1492514A, US-A-1492514, US1492514 A, US1492514A
InventorsHarris Jensen Frank
Original AssigneeHarris Jensen Frank
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arch support
US 1492514 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 29 1924.

F. H. JENSEN I ARCH SUPPORT Filed Feb. 18 1920 Apr. 2%, 322%.

entree stares T HARRIS JENSEN, OF CHELSEA, MASSACHUSETTS.

ARCH SUPPORT.

Application filed February 18, 1920. aerial No. 359,487.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that LFRANK H. JENSEN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chelsea, in the county of Suil'olk, State of 5 Massachusetts, have invented a new and use ful Arch Support; and l do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

The invention relates to arch supports and has for its object to provide. an elastic cull adapted to encircle the foot and provided on its under side with a pocket, in which pocket various sizes of pads may be disposed so that the transverse arch may be gradually built up and elevated, the pad being adapted to be disposed below the metatarsal heads so that said heads will be ac gradually forced up and held in their or1g1 nal positions. The cull being particularly adapted for use in cases of a character known as metatarsaliga, which cases involve pain in the metatarsal heads and are evidenced by the down dropping of the anterior transverse arch of the foot. The elastic cu'ii serving the function of assisting the pad in maintaining the anterior transverse arch in normal or raised position.

With the above and other objects in view the invention resides in the combination and arrangement of parts as hereinafter set forth, shown in the drawings described and claimed, it being understood that changes in the precise embodiment of the invention ma be made within the scope of what is claimed without departing from the sp1r1r.

of the invention.

In the drawings Figure 1 is a side elevation of a foot showing the cuff applied thereto.

Figure 2 is a sectional view taken on line 22 of Figure 1.

gigure 3 is a perspective view of the cu Referring more especially to the drawings, the numeral 1 designates a foot and 2 the transverse arch thereof, which arch when broken down causes in what are known as the metatarsal heads what is known as metatarsaliga, which is pain in the metatarsal heads. To overcome the above trouble and to relieve the pain it is necessary to graduall verse arch 2 until t e metatarsal heads are build up the transrestored to their normal position. To accomplish the building up of the transverse arch an elastic band 3 is provided, which band is adapted to encircle the foot as shown in Figure 1. Band 3 is formed -from a single piece of elastic material, the ends of which are brought together as shown at a in- Figure 3 and then the ends are secured together by means of strips of adhesive material 5, or if so desired the strips 5 may 5 be sewed to the ends 6 of the band. Secured to the under face of the cuff by means of stitching 7 is a piece of fabric 8, which fabric is substantially V-shaped so that the stitching 7 will cause a V-shaped or tapered pocket 9, in which pocket a pad 10 is adapted to be received. The pad 10 is preferably formed from the soft material such as felt, and during the first stages of the treatment the pad 10 is comparatively thin, however as the arch is gradually built up, pads of greater thickness are used until the arch is built up to its normal position as shown in Figure 2 at which time the cuff may -'be continued to be used until the transverse Q arch will remain in normal position. During the building up of the arch it will be seen that the elast1c material from which the cult is formed will exert a pressure on the foot at its sides thereby causing the 35 bones 11 to be forced upwardly as shown in Figure 2 so that the transverse arch 2 will be formed. During the building up the transverse arch, the elastic band by exerting a pressure on both sides of the foot will materially assist the pad 10 in holding up the bones which form the transverse arch.

From the above it will be seen that a transverse arch support is provided which is formed from elastic material in the form of a cuff, thereby allowing the same to be quickly applied to the foot and also one wherein various sizes of arched building up and supporting pads may be quickly placed. 190 The elastic material adjacent the V-shaped pocket allowing the placin within the pocket of various sizes of pads, which pads will be held by the contracting force of said material. It will also be seen that a transverse arch supporter is provided wherein the elastic material from which it is formed will assist the pads in raising the transverse arch and also will assist in maintaining the bones forming the transno verse arch in raised or elevated positions after they have been built up to normal po- .sitions by the use of pads.

The invention having been set forth What is claimed as new and useful is A transverse arch support comprising an elastic band adapted to encircle the foot and positioned in registration with the transverse arch of said foot, said band exerting a contracting force on the foot, a pocket on the under side of said band, said pocket being formed from contractable material, thereby providing a pocket Which Will receive therein and hold against dis placement. therein various sizes of pads.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing Witnesses.

FRANK HARRIS JENSEN. Witnesses:

ANIEL H. SULLIVAN, MILDRED L. CHRISTENSEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3926186 *May 28, 1974Dec 16, 1975Nirschl Robert PMuscular support
US4614180 *Aug 8, 1985Sep 30, 1986Electro-Biology, Inc.Medical appliance
US5396896 *May 15, 1991Mar 14, 1995Chrono Dynamics, Ltd.Medical pumping apparatus
US5443440 *Jun 11, 1993Aug 22, 1995Ndm Acquisition Corp.Medical pumping apparatus
US5545129 *Feb 13, 1995Aug 13, 1996Snook; Kim C.Supportive foot cushion device
US5671751 *Mar 21, 1995Sep 30, 1997Lrc Holding Company, Inc.Medical pumping apparatus
US5769801 *Oct 7, 1994Jun 23, 1998Ndm Acquisition Corp.For applying compressive pressures against a patient's foot
US5840049 *Sep 7, 1995Nov 24, 1998Kinetic Concepts, Inc.Medical pumping apparatus
US5840053 *Oct 5, 1995Nov 24, 1998American Arch LlcDevice for foot stabilization
US5931797 *Dec 23, 1997Aug 3, 1999Kinetic Concepts, Inc.Medical pumping apparatus
US5989204 *Mar 19, 1997Nov 23, 1999Kinetic Concepts, Inc.Foot-mounted venous compression device
US6129688 *Sep 6, 1996Oct 10, 2000Aci MedicalSystem for improving vascular blood flow
US6358219Jun 27, 2000Mar 19, 2002Aci MedicalSystem and method of improving vascular blood flow
US6558339Nov 19, 1999May 6, 2003Michael E. GrahamFoot alleviator
US6893409Nov 2, 1999May 17, 2005Kci Licensing, Inc.Foot mounted venous compression device
US8162868Aug 11, 2009Apr 24, 2012Steve LlorensArch support wrap
US8240066 *Jun 11, 2007Aug 14, 2012Brent Ellis LoganArch support independent of footwear
USRE32939 *May 16, 1988Jun 6, 1989Electro-Biology, Inc.Medical appliance
WO1996011651A1 *Oct 12, 1995Apr 25, 1996Ivar E RothDevice for foot stabilization
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/66
International ClassificationA61F13/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/065
European ClassificationA61F13/06D2