Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1492905 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 6, 1924
Filing dateJun 14, 1923
Priority dateJun 14, 1923
Publication numberUS 1492905 A, US 1492905A, US-A-1492905, US1492905 A, US1492905A
InventorsSwanick Joseph G
Original AssigneeColumbia Salvage Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for unloading high-explosive shells
US 1492905 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. G. SWANICK May 6, 1924.

METIOD AND APPARATUS FOR UNLOADING HIGH EXPLOSIVE SHELLS Filed June 14. 1923' INVENTOR fqsep/z 0. 5 Wanic/r.

ATTORNEY 3 Patented May 6, 1924.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

JOSEPH G. SWANICK. OF FORDS` NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO COLUMBIA SALVAGV'E COR- PORATION, OF NEW YORK. Y., A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR UNLOADING HIGH-EXPLOSIVE SHELLS.

Application tiled June 14, 1923. Serial No. 645,313.

To all 107mm 'it -nm'l/ concern.:

Be it known that I, Tosi-:rn G. SwaNlori, a citizen of the United States, and resident of Fords. in the county of Middlesex and lQtate of New Jersey. have invented certain new and useful improvements in illethods and Apparatus for Unloading lligh-llxplosive Shells ((ase No. 13). of which the following is a. specification.

The main object of this invention is to provide a new and useful method and apparatus for unloading high-explosive shells. It is necessary that the entire high-explosive charge be removed from the shells in order that the empty shells may be safely melted or reduced in a blast furnace or otherwise. These shells are of high quality steel and are valuable provided the explosive charge is entirely removed.

A high explosive shell for artillery use consists, ordinarily, of a hollow steel shell filled with a charge of high explosive, said charge 'being substantially solid when cooled and forming a. practically homogeneous dry mass which substantially fills the shell. The shell is usually )ointed at one end and said pointed end is known as the nose. In the nose is formed a longitudinally extending threaded aperture in which is screwed a flanged adapter ring: and said ring carries a booster casing and a fuse.. Before the shells can be unloaded, that is to say the charge removed, the adapter ring carrying the booster casing and the booster charge must be removed. The fuse, or fuse stock. is inserted only when making the shell ready for firing. A great many of these high explosive shells are charged with amatol or pure trinitrotoluol (TNT). matol is a mixture of ammonium nitrate and TNT in proper proportions. These high explosive charges are fluid or semi-fluid at certain temperatures and are usually poured into the shell in a fluid or semi-fluid state. lVhen the charge cools it solidifies within the shell and becomes a substantially solid and hornogeneous mass of material which completely fills the entire shell except for a small space at the nose, which space is designed to receive the booster easing.

The main purpose of this invention is to provide a. method and apparatus :for safely. completely and quickly removing these high eX lesive charges from the shells.

ig. 1 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view of an apparatus for carrying out-the invention; and

F ig. a transverse sectional view taken on the line| 2 2 of Fig. l.

In carrying out this invention the adapter ring and the booster casing are first removed. thereby leaving the threaded aperture in the. nose of the shell open so that access may be had therethrough to the interior ot' the shell. lVhen the booster casing .is removed the booster cavity in the explosive charge is open to and axially in line with the threaded aperture in the shell.

The simple forni of the apparatus shown in the drawing comprises a tubular discharge channel or trough 1 of suitable diameter to receive the discharge from the shells to be treated. This discharge-channel is provided with upwardly extending vertical tubular shell guides 2 spaced apart along the channel and of sullieient height to properly support and guide the shells. vEach guide is open at its upper end, and is very slightly larger in internal diameter than thel external diameter of the shell to be treated therein, so that the shell may slide down into the guide and have a snug fit therein.

A steam supply pipe extends through the tubular channel 1; and said pipeis provided with a series of upwardly extending long slender vertical nozzles 4. Each nozzle is axially arranged within one of the tubular guides 2 and extends near to the upper open end thereof. Each .nozzle is open at-its upper end and is provided with three series of apertures, 5. 6 and 7 spaced a suitable distance apart alongthe nozzle. The upper series 5 are placed near the upper ends of the nozzles. The lower series of apertures 7 are so placed that they are a short distance within the shell when the shell has reached the limit of its downward movement in the guide.

Steam at the desired pressure will be supplied to the pipe 3 :from any suitable source and said supply may be controlled by any suitable means.

The shells to be treated are arranged in an inverted position with their open pointed ends extending down into the tubular guides 8. The upper ends of the nozzles enter the booster cavity in the charge. v

Steam flows in fine jets through the ends of the nozzles and through the jet openings 5, 6 and 7. The shells are supported by the nozzles, the upper ends of the nozzles Yresting against the bottoms of the booster cavities. The steam jets fiowmg throu h the ends of the nozzles will soften, lique y and dislodge the material at the bottom of the booster cavity, and the nozzles will qulckly cut their way through the mass of the charges. As Yeach charge is softened and dislodged the shell will slide down into the tubular guide.

The lateral jets of steam flowmv through the upper a ertures assist in cutting a central channe or path through the charge and also soften vand liquefy the side walls of the booster cavity. The downward movement of the shell will continue until the rifiing band or ring near the base of the A shell rests on the upper edge of the guide.

In this position of the shell the lowermost set of apertures 7 will be a short distance within the shell and in the narrow part thereof. These lower lateral jets will serve as a check to prevent a too free outflow of liquid material from the shell. A part of the steam will condense Within the shell and the hot water thus produced will be swirled around by the lateral jets and assist materially in softening and liquefying the charge.

The liquid will fiow from the shells into the discharge channel and then to suitable tanks.

It is desirable that the shells serve as closures for the upper ends of the guides in order to prevent waste of steam and to confine the steam so that it will serve as a means for treating the body of the shell. The shells are automatically fed by gravity to the nozzles.

What I claim is:

l. The method of removing a high-ex l0- sive charge from a shell consisting in p acing a shell upright with its open end downwardly and over a long slender nozzle, loosely supporting the shell to permit it to move by gravity downwardly over the nozzle as the charge is dissolved, and supplying steam to the nozzle.

2. The method of removing a high-explosive charge from a shell consisting in placing a shell upright with its open end downwardly and over a long slender nozzle, loosely supporting the shell in a tubular guide surrounding the nozzle to permit the shell to move by gravity downwardly in the tubular guide and over the nozzle as the charge is dissolved, and supplying steam to the nozzle.

3. The method of removing a high-ex losive charge from a shell consisting in p acing a shell upright with its o n end downwardly and over a long s ender nozzle, loosely supporting the shells in cylindrical tubular guides open at their upper ends and of such an internal diameter as to have a loose sliding fit with the shell, to permit memes zles as the charge is dissolved, supplying steam to the nozzle, and providing lateral jets of steam which will progressively enter the shell as it moves down over the nozzle.

5. The method of removing a high-ex losive char e from a shell consisting in p acing a she l'upright with its o en end downwardly and over a long s ender nozzle, loosely supporting the shell to permit it to move by gravity downwardly over the nozzle as the charge is dissolved, supplying steam to the nozzle, and providing lateral jets of steam within the shell near its lower open end, said lateral jets serving to check the outflow of liquid from the shell.

6. An apparatus for liquefying and removing a so idified explosive charge from a shell, comprising a rigid vertical upwardly extending nozzle, means for supplying steam to said nozzle, a vertical shell gulde around said nozzle and o en at its upper end to receive a shell, sai guide being adapted to support the shell open end downward and in substantial axial alinement with the nozzle and to permit it to feed by gravity down over the nozzle as the charge in the shell is liquefied and discharged.

7. An apparatus for liqueying and removing a solidified explosive charge from a shell, comprising a long slender rigid vertical upwardly extendin nozzle open at its upper end and provide with apertures in its sides at separated points longitudinally of the nozzle, means for su plyin steam to said nozzle, a vertical shel gui e around said nozzle and o en at its upper end to receive a shell, sai guide being adapted to support the shell open end downward and in substantial axial alinement with the nozzle and to permit it to feed by gravity down over the nozzle as the charge in the shell is liquefied and discharged, whereby the lateral steam jets fiowing throu h the apertures in the sides of the nozzle wi l progressively enter the shell.

8. An ap aratus for liquefying and removing a so idified explosive charge from a shell, comprising a rigid vertical upwardly extending nozzle, means for supplying steam to said nozzle, a vertical tubular shell guide around said nozzley and open at its upper end to receive a shell, said guide being adapted to support the shell o en end downward and in substantial axial a inement with the nozzle and to permit it to feed by gravity down over the nozzle as the charge in the shell is liquefied and discharged.

9. An apparatus for liquefying and removing a solidified explosive charge from a shell, comprising a rigid vertical upwardly extending nozzle, means for supplying steam to said nozzle, a vertically cylindrical tubular shell guide around said nozzle, said guide heilig open at its upper end and having an interna-l diameter slightly larger than the external diameter of the shell to be treated and adapted to support the shell open 0nd downward in substantial axial alinment with the nozzle, whereby said shell may move downwardly by gravity over the nozzle as the charge in the shell is liquefied and discharged.

10. The method of removing an explosive charge from a shell consisting in placing a shell upright with its open end downwardly and over a long slender nozzle, loosely supporting the shell in a substantially vertical position to permit it to lmove by gravity downwardly over the nozzle as the charge is dissolved, and supplying 4a highly heated moisture-carrying pressure jet to the nozzle.

11. The method of'removing a solidified explosive charge from a shell consisting in placing the shell upright with its open end downwardly and overa long slender nozzle, loosely supporting the shell to permit it to move by gravit-y downwardly ovel` the nozzle as the charge is dissolved. supplying a highly heated moisture-carrying pressure jet to the nozzle, and providing lateral highly heated moisture-carrying pressure jets within the shell near its lower open end, said lateral jets serving to check the outflow of liquid from the shell.

In testimony whereof I hereunto atiix my signature.

JOSEPH G. SWANICK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2491516 *Jan 12, 1944Dec 20, 1949Misener Carroll CMethod and means to safely deactivate explosive bearing ordnance
US3088473 *Oct 17, 1962May 7, 1963Bernhard RoggeMunition cleaning equipment
US3440096 *Jul 16, 1962Apr 22, 1969Byron Jackson IncMethod of removing solid propellant
US3446667 *Feb 25, 1966May 27, 1969Halliburton CoMethod for removing material from the interior of articles
US5737709 *Sep 17, 1996Apr 7, 1998Getty; Heather L.Nonexplosive high speed jetting of pressurized fluid into interior projectile shell through a nozzle having fine diameter orifices
US5781868 *Oct 10, 1996Jul 14, 1998Alliant Techsystems Inc.High pressure washout of chemical agents
US6491047 *Nov 15, 1999Dec 10, 2002Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Method of cleaning container for photographic treatment composition and apparatus therefor
US6526998Apr 8, 2002Mar 4, 2003Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Method of cleaning container for photographic treatment composition and apparatus therefor
US6805140 *Oct 15, 2002Oct 19, 2004United Technologies CorporationProbe with longitudinal axis and perpendicular offset nozzles connected to common manifold; aircraft engines
US7225926Aug 21, 2002Jun 5, 2007Fujifilm CorporationCleaning container for photographic treatment composition
US7406971 *Dec 29, 2003Aug 5, 2008United Technologies CorporationMethod of simultaneously flushing internal cavities of multiple parts
US7631588Jan 11, 2006Dec 15, 2009Parsons CorporationApparatus for removing toxic material from toxic weapon projectiles
US7753061Jun 25, 2008Jul 13, 2010United Technologies CorporationHigh pressure internal cleaning method and apparatus
US7878100Apr 6, 2009Feb 1, 2011Parsons CorporationMethod for removing toxic material from toxic weapon projectiles
US7941920Mar 15, 2010May 17, 2011United Technologies CorporationBlade outer seal assembly and method
US8052385Mar 15, 2010Nov 8, 2011United Technologies CorporationBlade outer seal assembly
WO1996021136A1 *Dec 21, 1995Jul 11, 1996Michael S CypherHigh pressure washout of explosive agents
WO1996021838A2 *Dec 21, 1995Jul 18, 1996Global Environmental SolutionsHigh pressure washout of chemical agents
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/5, 134/23, 134/152, 134/31, 134/198, 134/104.4
International ClassificationF42B33/06, F42B33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF42B33/062
European ClassificationF42B33/06B