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Publication numberUS1492924 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 6, 1924
Filing dateApr 17, 1923
Priority dateApr 17, 1923
Publication numberUS 1492924 A, US 1492924A, US-A-1492924, US1492924 A, US1492924A
InventorsKnight Thomas F
Original AssigneeColumbia Salvage Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for unloading high-explosive shells
US 1492924 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 6 1924.

' T. F. KNIGHT METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR UNLOADING HIGH EXPLOSIVE SHELLS Filed April 17. 1923 A TTORNE YJ' Patented May 6,1924.

UNITED STATES THOMAS Ii. KNIGHT, F LYNDHURST, JERSEY, ASSIGNOB T0 COLUMBIA "SALVAGE PATENT OFFICE.

CORPORATION, NEW YORK, N. Y.,' A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR UNLOADING HIGH-EXPLOSIVE SHELLS.

Application filed April 17, 1923. Serial No. 632,674.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, THOMAS F. KNIGHT, a subject of the King of Great Britain, and resident of Lyndhurst, in the county of Bergen and State of New Jersey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Methods and Apparatus for Unloading High-Explosive Shells (Case No. 1'), of which the following is a specification.

The main object of this invention is to provide a new and useful method and apparatus for unloading high explosive sliells.

It is necessary that the entire high explosive charge be removed from the shells in order that the empty shells may be safely melted or reduced in ablast furnace or otherwise. These shells are of high quality steel and are valuable provided the explosive charge is entirely removed.

A high' explosive shell for artillery use, consists ordinarily, of a hollow steel shell filled with a charge of high explosive, said t charge being substantially solid when cooled and forming a practically homogeneous dry mass which substantially fills the shell. The shell is-usually pointed at one end and said pointed end is known as the nose. In the nose is formed a longitudinally extending threaded aperture in which is screwed a flanged adapter ring; and said ring carries a booster casing and a fuse. Before the shells can be unloaded, that is to say, the charge removed, the adapter ring carrying the booster casing and the booster. charge must beremoved. The fuse, or fuse stock, is insorted only when making the shell ready for firing. These high explosive charges are fluid or semi-fluid at certain temperatures and are; usually poured into the shell in' a fluid or semi-fluid state. When the charge cools it solidifies within the shell and becomes a substantially solid and homogeneous mass of material which completely fills the entire shell except-for a small space at the nose which space is designed to receive the booster casing. p

' I The main purpose of this invention is to provide a method and apparatus for safety,

completely and quickly removing these high explosive charges from the shells.

In the drawing, Fig. 1 is a plan view of an' apparatus for carrying out the invention; F i 2 a vertical sectional view taken on the hne 22 of Fig. 1; and i Fig. 3 a central sectional view of one o the steam and water nozzles.

In carrying out this invention the adapter ring and the booster casing are first removed thereby leaving the threaded aperture in the nose of the shell open so that access may be had therethrough to the interior of the shell. The shells are arranged side by side on a tiltable table 1 with their open ends along the front edge thereof. The table is provided with an upstanding flange 2 at its front end against which the open nose of the shells rest. The table is provided with a longitudinal groove 3 near its rear end in which groove the rifling band of the shell fits. The flange 2 serves to hold the shells in position on the table whenthe table is tilted forwardly and, downwardly as shown in the drawing. The shells'are preferably moved along a support 4 in order tobring them in position to'be rolled on to the table 1. The support 4 may be a conveyor or an inclined board or chute. the shells in .a horizontal position at one end of the table so that they may be conveniently rolled on to the table and arranged side by side with their open ends directed toward the flange 2. The table is provided with a lever 5 by which it may be tilted downwardly and forwardly in order to place the shells in an inclined position with their open ends pointing downwardly. QAUanged along the front edge of the It is desirable to deliver table is a water supply pipe 6 to whichis connected a suitable flexible hose 7. Connected to the pipe 6 are water nozzles 8, one for each shell to be treated. These water nozzles are adapted to be passed into the shells through the open ends thereof and the free ends of these nozzles are open. Within the water supply pipe 6 is arranged a steam supply pipe 9, said plpe 9 having a flexible connect-ion 10 through which steam passes to the pipe 9. The pipe 9 is provided with steam nozzles 11 arranged concentrically within the water nozzles 8.- Each nozzle 11 is provided with a perforated spraying cap 12secured to the end thereof and adjacent the end of the water nozzle. The cap 12.is provided with perforations so arranged as to direct jets of steam laterally across the end of the water nozzle.

A trough 13 arranged along the front edge of thetable and directly below it and IS "of the shells.

designed to receive the liquid material discharged from the shells. The steam and water supply pipes are arranged to slide up and down on inclined guide ways 14 so that the nozzles may be moved into and out The guide ways 14 are connected by a horizontal supporting rod 15 which serves as a convenient support for the nozzles when they are entirely withdrawn from the shells.

When the table is filled with shells it is swung on its pivots and then the steam and water nozzles are moved up into the shells and preferably into contact with the solidified charge therein. The steam and water supply is' then turned on. The steam jets blowing across the open ends of the water nozzles produce a highly heated water spray within the shell and said highly heated spray is directed against the solidified charge. The spray heats, moistens and liquefies the charge and causes it to be discharged in liquid form through the lower open ends of the shells. The steam not only produces a hot water spray but thoroughly agitates the material within the shells and causes it to swirl around and disintegrate the mass. As the mass is dissolved or liquefied the nozzles are moved up into the shells in order to keep the hot water spray close to the unliquefied mass. The operator, manually moves the nozzles into the shells by sliding the supply pipe along the inclined guides 14.,

When the charge is completely liquefied and discharged the nozzles are removed and the table swung up into. horizontal position. The shells may then be removed from thetable back to the support 4 and a new supply of loaded shells placed on the table.

What I claim is:

1. The method of removing a solidified explosive charge from a shell, consisting in placing the shell with its open end directed downwardly, inserting a water and steam from artille shells, com rising a reci r0- cable fluld discharge nozz e, means gui ing the nozzle to move endwise w1th lts discharge end directed upwardly, shell deliver ing means, and a movable shell support located between said delivery means and said nozzle and shiftable from a position for receiving a shell from the delivering means to a position for presenting a shell in longitudinal alignment with said nozzle with the nose of the shell directed downwardly toward the discharge end of the nozzle.

4. An apparatus for removing charges from artillery shells, comprising a reciprocable fluid discharge nozzle, means guiding the nozzle to move endwise with its discharge end directed upwardly, shell delivering means, a movable shell support located between said delivering means and said nozzle and shiftable from a position for receiving 'a shell from the deliveringfmeafis twa position for presenting a shell in longitudinal alignment with said nozzle with the nose of the shell directed downwardly toward the discharge end of the nozzle, and means for receivingthe solution draining from a shell into which a jet from the nozzle is directed.

5. In an apparatus of the class set forth, the combination of a rotatable shell support,

a fluid supply nozzle mounted adjacent said support and having its discharge end normally below the support, means for rotating the support to present a shell in alignment with the nozzle with the nose end of the shell directed downwardly toward the discharge end of the nozzle, and means for guiding the nozzle for endwise movement into and out of a shell on the supfport.

6. In an apparatus 0 the class set forth, the combination of a shell support rockable from a horizontal shell-receiving position to an inclined osition for holding shells with the nose en s thereof directed downwardly, a fluid discharge nozzle, and means supportnozzle within the open end of said'*shell, ing\said n0zz1e for diagonal movement endcausing steam and water to flow through of the open end of, a

highly heated water spray within the shell, and moving the steam and water nozzles into the shell as the solidified charge is liquefied and discharged through the lower open end of the shell. 4

2. An apparatus for unloading solidified explosive charges from high-explosive shells, comprising a shiftable nozzle, means for supplying fiuid to said nozzle, means for guiding the nozzle to move endwise into an out shell body, and a tiltable shell support movable from a shell-receiving position to a position for presenting a shell 1n vwith the open end of the shell directed toward the discharge end of the nozzle.

3. An apparatus for removing charges longitudinal alignment with the nozzle class set form low the path of movement of the nozzle in I position to receive a solution draining from a shell on the support when saidsupport is in tilted osition. 4

In testimony whereof I signature.

hereunto .afiix my THOMAS F. KNIGHT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2491516 *Jan 12, 1944Dec 20, 1949Misener Carroll CMethod and means to safely deactivate explosive bearing ordnance
US2510056 *Feb 12, 1945Jun 6, 1950Axtell Willard GBomb salvage
US2512597 *Nov 20, 1945Jun 27, 1950Axtell Willard GBomb dismantling apparatus
US2708943 *Aug 12, 1953May 24, 1955Acf Ind IncApparatus for handling and liquid treating articles
US2948004 *Nov 22, 1955Aug 9, 1960Shields Walter AApparatus for cleaning vials and inserting a plunger into one end of each cleaned vial
US3446667 *Feb 25, 1966May 27, 1969Halliburton CoMethod for removing material from the interior of articles
US4375413 *Jun 19, 1981Mar 1, 1983Cordis Dow Corp.Rinsing device and method of rinsing artificial kidneys therewith
US5618353 *May 31, 1995Apr 8, 1997Howmet CorporationCleaning, method for cleaning internal airfoil cooling passages
US5714707 *May 13, 1996Feb 3, 1998Talon Manufacturing Company, Inc.Process and apparatus for demilitarization of small caliber primed cartridge cases
US6080906 *Sep 14, 1998Jun 27, 2000Alliedsignal, Inc.Demilitarization of chemical munitions
US6245958 *Sep 12, 1997Jun 12, 2001Lockheed Martin CorporationMethods for non-incendiary disposal of rockets, projectiles, missiles and parts thereof
US6491047 *Nov 15, 1999Dec 10, 2002Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Method of cleaning container for photographic treatment composition and apparatus therefor
US6526998Apr 8, 2002Mar 4, 2003Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Method of cleaning container for photographic treatment composition and apparatus therefor
US6901835 *Nov 26, 2003Jun 7, 2005Day & Zimmerman, Inc.Cone and charge extractor
US7225926Aug 21, 2002Jun 5, 2007Fujifilm CorporationCleaning container for photographic treatment composition
US7926495 *Apr 19, 2011Weckerle GmbhMold cleaning device
US20030111096 *Aug 21, 2002Jun 19, 2003Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Method of cleaning container for photographic treatment composition and apparatus therefor
US20050109199 *Nov 26, 2003May 26, 2005Day & Zimmermann, Inc.Cone and charge extractor
US20060213540 *Mar 24, 2006Sep 28, 2006Gilg Franz XMold cleaning device
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/5, 86/49, 134/102.1, 134/43, 134/24, 134/167.00R, 134/103.3, 134/172, 134/144, 134/152
International ClassificationF42B33/00, F42B33/06
Cooperative ClassificationF42B33/062
European ClassificationF42B33/06B