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Publication numberUS1495070 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 20, 1924
Filing dateJun 20, 1923
Priority dateJun 20, 1923
Publication numberUS 1495070 A, US 1495070A, US-A-1495070, US1495070 A, US1495070A
InventorsDozier Finley
Original AssigneeParaffine Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Strip shingle
US 1495070 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 20, 1924. I 1 1,495,070

' D. FINLEY STRIP SHINGLE Filed J 118 20. 1923 FIE] .5

m/z/E/vme DUI/ER F/NLEY WITNESS EH 2 BY MM A TTOE/VEYJ Patented may 2c, 1924..

DOZIER FINLEY, OF BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOR TO THE PARAFFINE (JOINI- EANIES, INQ, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, A CORPORATION OF CALIFORNIA.

STRIP SHINGLE.

Application filed June 20, 1923. Serial No. 646,572.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, DOZIER FINLEY, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Berkeley, county of Alameda, and State of California, have invented a new and useful Strip Shingle, of which the following is a specification.

The invention relates to strip shingles or roofing strips and one of the objects of the invention is the production of a unit of this kind having the greatest possible latitude in its adaptation to ornamental and architectural effects.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a strip shingle which may be laid to give a close simulation of a rood formed of wooden shingles.

Another object of the invention is the production of a strip shingle which is so designed that the eye cannot readily identify the shingle-like tabs which form part of any one strip.

Another object of the invention is the pro-' duction of a strip shingle possessed of great ornamental possibilities, and which is at the same time economical, in that the smallest possible amount of roofing material is used' in proportion to the exposed surface of the shin les.

O-t or objects of the invention, together with the foregoing, will be set forth in the following description of the preferred embodiment of means for practicing the invention, and which is illustrated in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the specification. It is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the showing made by the said description and drawings, as I may adopt variations of my preferred form within the scope of my invention as set forth in the claims.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of my roofing strli p.

. igure 2 is a plan view of a strlp of roofing material out of which my shingles are formed and showing how the shipgles are cut relative to the strips.

' Figure 3 is a plan view of a section of roof formed with my shingles.

Figures 1 and 5 are plan views of modified forms of m shingle strip, and illustrate the possibility of varying sizes in the individual shingle tabs without varying the shingles are of a geometrically repetitional shape and are laid down in a checker-board pattern. In strip shingles heretofore known it is impossible to secure variations of colors which will be haphazard in the coloring of the individual tabs of the strips when the shingles are laid in place. If the strip shingles consist of four exposed tabs, a roof laid to-give color variation will show four tabs of one color in line and-four tabs of another color in line, and four tabs of still another color also in line, and so on indefinitely, that is the roof is divided into groups of four tabs each and the eye can, analyze this arrangement and classify the effort of the designer as a cheap attempt at ornamentation.

Forms of strip shingles heretofore proposed have been characterized by a rigid adherence to the principle that the tabs of such shingles must be of the same geometrical shape and size. This results in checkerboard or at least a geometrical effect when such shingles strips are laid, and while this effect is in some degree alleviated by the use of diflerent colors for alternate rows and by the laying of alternating rows of strips in reverse position, such roofs always retain the appearance of mechanical regularity. The irregularity of width of the wooden shingle, and the variation of color which characterizes it because of the varyin texture of the wood, are the basic reasons %or its selection in securing certain artistic and architectural results, which it has been impossible to obtain by any other means. My invention is directed to supplying in a strip shingle means for attaining the same, or at least comparable results.

It will be understood that if the tabs in any one shingle strip are all of a single color and shape, it is impossible for a stri to be laid out so that the tabs will not fa into groups of three, four or five tabs in line and of the same color. I have, therefore, sought in my strip shingle to make the exe shingle-like tabs.

posed tabs of any one strip fall so far as possible. into two or more difierent rows when the strip is laid. I have also sought to make tabs of varying sizes and to interrupt or break the serial continuity of more than two-shin le tabs of the same color in one line. In t 0 present invention I have so far accomplished these ends as to make the tabs of each strip fall into two rows and in no case-are more than two shingle tabs of a strip brought into a side by side position. The effect is such that the eye does not analyze the system by which the tabs are" positioned without long study and the eye does not even classify the connection between the tabs of any one strip when there is an extremely wide variation of color in the difierent, strips. For this reason a roof of my strip shingles in which there is a wide variation of color will appear to be made with individual shingles of varying color and size placed haphazard.

In terms of broad inclusion, my strip shingle comprises a strip of roofin material basically rectangular in form and avin recesses in one of the'long sides which orm beyond the confines of the basic rectangle so that when the shingle strip is laid the extended tab forms part of the next lower course... One of the recesses is somewhat wider than theextended tabs and provides an apparent interruption'in the continuity of the row of tabs in which is laid the extended tab of the shingle strip next above. Preferably the .recewes are so spaced that the' shingle tabs formed thereby vary in width. p

In Figure 1, I have shown 'a plan view of a strip shingle embodying my invention- The dimensions of the several parts of the strip shingle are also indicated, the not in anyway as a limitation because it is obvious that these are subject to wide variation. The dimensions, however, will indicate vthe general pro rtions existing be tween the parts and d fine a size which I have found to be very satisfactory and one economically obtained from a strip of roofing material forty inches wide. The method of cutting these shingles from a strip of roofing material is indicated in Figure 2, and] it will be noted that the design is such to be substantially without waste, such waste being confined to=the material from the recesses 7. The stripshingle, as shown in Figural, is principally'oonfined within a basically rectangular outline. Slots or re-' cesses 7 preferably of a width comparable with that usually existing; between wooden shingles in a row or course are formed in one of the long sides of the rebtan le. The spacing 0:? these recesses from t e ends of the 1s suchas to formtabs 8, 9 and 10 of e 3 di erent width, andv the depth of the re- One of these tabs extends aseao'ro tabs 9 and 10, is that amount which it is desired to expose the strip to the weather, p

and in the present instance may be assumed to be .4 inches. The and tab 8 1s extended beyond! the confines of the basic, rectangle an additional four inches, that is foran amount suflicient to bring the endof it coincident with the edge of the next lower 1 course of tabs when the shingle strips are laid. Also formed in the same side of the shingle strips is a wide recess 12of thesanie dept apparentinterruption in their conpreferred to make a portion of any lot of shin le strips with the tabs 9 andlO'of the widlt s indicated in Figure 1, and another portion of the lot in which. these dimensions are reversed, but in all cases to keep the sum as the recess 7 and! preferably 'a bit wider than the tab 8. This recess leaves the: shingle-like tab 13 to complete theseries of tabs formed on the shingle strip, and proof their respective widths 16 inches. This variation is shown in Figure 4 and indicated by the dimensions in circles in Figure 1. It will be noted that in the method of cutting the strip shingle illustrated in Figure 2, one

half of the number areformed as shown in Figure 1 and one-half as shown in Fi 4, that is withthedimensions of tabs 9 and 10 reversed. Of course, the particular dimensions may be departed from, or even five tabs may be used in place of those described,

as shown in Figure 5,, .in which the right hand tab is split into two tabs 14 and 15. I have found, however, that the variation of the two tabs 9 and 10, together with all of the other elusory variations in the strip,

is sufiicient to accomplish the purposeof my invention. 1

In laying the shingle stri s, nails are driven throu h the shingles into the roof deck preferab and of each 0 the slots or recesses 7, above above the upper, or up-roof the middle portion of the tab-13 and in the middle of tab 8 just within the basic rectangle. The position of the nails is indicated by crosses 16 in Fi re 1. (It will be seen that all nails so p aced, are in. such position as to be covered by the. overlying shingle tabs.

In Figure 3, I have shown a the variation shown in Figures 1 and 4, are laid in successive rows of four inches exposure to the weather each, building up portion of a root formed by my shingle str p. Stripsof the above described character and with 1, the right end of each strip over-lies the left end of the next shingle strip in the row}, a distance of four inches, and each underlyin strips.

strip is offset with relation to the next lower one, a distance of 8% inches to the left. When so laid the extended tab 8 of a given strip lies within the recess 12 of one of the each shingle extends down-roof into a row of shingles below that in which the remainder of its exposed tabs are positioned, and in turn the continuity of the remaining tabs is broken by the interposition among them of an exposed portion of a long tab from a strip in the row above. Thus with shingle strips of two or three varying shades laid haphazard, the otherwise geometrical eflI'ect of the exposed shingle-like tabs, is so broken up as to prevent ready analysis of the system of laying. This gives an eflect heretofore found impossible to obtain with strip shingles, and one associated only with the use of wooden shingles.

By lapping the .ends of the strips as described, there is produced a raised place, or hump, at intervals in each row. This is not objectionable in a roof such as is obtained by the use of my shingle strips, and rather con tributes to a desirable departure from the flatness and mechanical exactness which characterizes shingle strip coverings of prepared roofing of the type heretofore in use.

I claim: v 1. A roofing strip comprising a series of shingle-like rectangular tabs, one of said tabs extending beyond the others.

2. A roofing stri comprising a basically rectangular piece 0 roofing material having recesses in one of the long sides thereof to formshingle-like tabs, one of said tabs being extended beyond the rectangular base,

Thus an exposed tab of and one of said recesses being wider than the others.

3. A' roofing strip comprising a series of 4:. A roofing strip comprising a basically rectangular piece of roo ng material having recesses in one of the long sides thereof to form shingle-like tabs, the tab on one end being extended beyond the rectangular pasahand the other tabs being of equal 5. Ashingle strip com rising a basically rectangular piece of roo ng material having a recess in oneofthe long sides thereof to'provide' an apparent interruption in onecourse of shingles, and an'extended tab on said piece adapted to fill the recess in the next course below. y

6. -A roof com rising courses of shingle strips, the main ody ofeach strip havin shingle-like tabs of unequal width formed thereon by recesses in the'ed e thereof, and 7 ody of each strip having,

" *DOZIEB FINLE

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/555
International ClassificationE04D1/00, E04D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26
European ClassificationE04D1/26