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Publication numberUS1497628 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 10, 1924
Filing dateMar 19, 1924
Priority dateMar 19, 1924
Publication numberUS 1497628 A, US 1497628A, US-A-1497628, US1497628 A, US1497628A
InventorsErnest Young
Original AssigneeErnest Young
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric soldering iron
US 1497628 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June l, 1924.

E.YOUNG ELECTRIC SOLDERING IRON Filed March 19 WIT/VESSES Patented June 10, 1924.-

UNITED STATES ERNEST YOUNG, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

ELECTRIC SOIiDEBING IRON Application led March 19, 1924. Serial No. 700,291.

To all whom t may concern:

Be it known'that I, ERNEST YOUNG, a citizen of their-United States, and a resident of the city of New York, borough of Brooklyn, in the county of Kings and State of New York, have invented a new and Improved Electric Solderingron,v of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

This invention relates to improvements in soldering irons, and has particular reference to an electric soldering iron.

An object of the invention is to provide a soldering iron of simple and practical construction in which the parts can be easily assembled and which in operation provides an extremely elicient implement wherein the handle is effectively insulated from the heat produced by the heating element.

The above and other objects will appear more clearly from the following detailed description, when taken in connection with the accompanyin drawing, which illustrates a preferred em odiment of the inventive idea.

In the drawing- Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of the iron constructed in accordance with the invention;

v Figure 2 is a plan View of the heating element before the insulating covering is placed thereon;

Figure 3 is a similar View, partly broken away and shown in section, of the heating element with the insulating covering there- Figure 4 is an elevation of one end of the heating element;

Figure 5 is a similar view of the opposite end;

Figure 6 is a section taken on the line 6 6 of Figure 2; and

Figure 7 is a fragmentary longitudinal section showing the manner of attaching 'a larger point to the iron.

The invention is shown as consisting ofba heatin element which comprises a core 6 of. cyllndrical formation having adjacent each end thereof an annular groove 7 forming the heads 8 and 9. Wound upon the intermediate portion of the core 6 is the coil 10 of suitable resistance wire, the ends of said coil 10 terminating adjacent the annular grooves 7 for a purpose which will presently appear. The ends of the coil. 10 have connected thereto two conductors 11 and 12 preferably formed of two-strand resistance wire. One end of the conductor 11 is first passedthrough a diagonally extending opening 13 formed in the head 8 of the core and with the insulation removed from said end the two strands of said conductor are passed around the core in the grooves 7 in opposite directions, as clearly shown in Figure 6, after which said ends are twisted together with the adjacent extremity of the coil 10 so as to securely connect one end of the coil with the conductor 11. The other conductor 12 is passed through an opening 14 extending longitudinally through the core 6 and communicating with a transverse slot 15 formed in the head 9, as shown in Figure 5. With the insulation removed from the end of the conductor 12 extendin through the head 9 the strands of the con uctor are passed in opposite directions around the end of the core in the groove adjacent the head 9 and thereafter twisted together with the adjacent end of the coil 10. In this man ner both ends of the coil 10 are securely connected to their respective conductors and after this operation has been completed the twisted extremities of the conductors and coil are bent into close proximity with the core and the entire heating element is then embedded in a covering 16 preferabl of porcelain-like cement which forms an e fective insulation for the coil.

After the heating element has been assembled, as described, the conductors 11 and 12 are inserted into one end of the tubular shank 17, the opposite end of which carries the handle 18 and the inner coupling 19 is then mounted upon the first-named end of said shank; A small quantity of cement or other insulating material 20 is then poured in a plastic state into the coupling 19 so as to close the adjacent end of the shank 17. The adjacent end of the heating elementis then forced into the body of cement with the conductors 11 and 12 extending therethrough in spaced relation. The

assembled parts are then baked to harden I the cement 2O which then forms an anchor or seat for the heating element and the Inaterial is of such nature as to rovide a heat insulation which will great y reduce the amount of heat transmitted from the heating element through the tubular member 17' and to thehandle 18. One of the serious objections to soldering irons new comheated to such an extent that it cannot be handled and this is mainly ascribed to the 'provision of the body 20 of insulating material in vwhich one end of the heating element is embedded. It will also be apparentI that by anchoring the inner ends of the conductors 11 and 12 in the body of cement 20 the same will be secured in such manner that any pull, accidental or otherwise, upon the cord throu h which the conductors extend and whic is utilized Vto attach the iron to an electric light socket, will not place any strain upon the points of connection of the conductors 11 and 12 with the coil 10. i

Upon the completion of the assemblin of the parts of the device thus fardescri d, one end of the tubular casing 21 is mounted upon the external threads of the inner coupling 19 so as to completely surround the heating element-and a sleeve 22 of insulating material, such as mica, is interposed between the heating element and the inner wall of said casing. The outer coupling or` head 23 carrying the point 24 is then threaded into the outer end of the casing 21 and this coupling is so formed as to provide an air s ace between the saine and the adjacent en of the heating element, this space, in effect, roviding an oven which aids in heating t e point 24:. This outer couplin 23 and point 24 may be removed and a ar er point 25 having anexternal -thread su stituted therefor, the external threads of the point engaging the internal threads of the casing, as shown in Figure 7.

What is claimed is: 1. In a soldering iron, a heating element including a core, a resistance coil wound on vsaid core, a multiple strand conductor extending through one end of saidI coro and havin the strands thereof wound ifi opposite irections about said core and then joined to one end of said coil by twisting said strands and end of the coil tother, and a .second multiple strand conuctor extending entirely thru said core and having the strands thereof also wound in opposite directions about said -core and joined to the opposite end of said coil by twisting said strands and opposite end of the coil together. v

2. In a .soldering iron, a heating element including a core, a resistance coil Wound on said Core, a multiple strand conductor extending through one .end of .said core and having the strands thereof wound in opposite directions about said core and then joined to one end of said coil by twisting saidstrands and end of the .coil together, a second multiple strand'conductor extending entirely thru said core and having the strands thereof also wound in opposite directions about said core and joined to the opposite end of said coil by twisting said strands and opposite end of the coil togather,` and a covering 'of insulating material for said coil.

3. In a soldering iron, a heating element, conductors connected thereto, a member through which said conductors extend, and cementitious insulating material in one end of saidmember by means of which said heating element and conductors are rigidly supported in said memben 4. In a soldering iron, a heating element including a resistance coil, a core carrying said coil and having an annular groove adjacent one end, said core also having an opening extending therethrough from end to end, and a second opening extending diagonally from one end of the core and cornmunicating with said annular groove, a member in which the latter end of said core is seated, `a conductor extending through the first named openin and connected to one end of said coil, an a second conductor having an end connected to the opposite end of said coil, said end of the second conductor extending through said diagonal opening and projecting from the end of the core in spaced relation to the member in which said core is seated.

5. In a Vsoldering iron, a member form- ERNEST YOUNG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2592426 *Feb 7, 1947Apr 8, 1952Jeffrey Max LSoldering iron
US3134884 *Jun 21, 1962May 26, 1964American Electrical Heater CoElectric soldering iron
US7238312 *Dec 2, 2002Jul 3, 2007Bravinski Leonid GMethod and apparatus for forming apertures in foamed polystyrene and other foamed plastic panels
US20040104504 *Dec 2, 2002Jun 3, 2004Bravinski Leonid G.Method and apparatus for forming apertures in foamed polystyrene and other foamed plastic panels
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/541, 219/236
International ClassificationB23K3/02, B23K3/03
Cooperative ClassificationB23K3/0353
European ClassificationB23K3/03J4