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Publication numberUS1504218 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1924
Filing dateJun 5, 1923
Priority dateJun 5, 1923
Publication numberUS 1504218 A, US 1504218A, US-A-1504218, US1504218 A, US1504218A
InventorsCrowell Charles H
Original AssigneeCrowell Charles H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process and machine for making cross-corrugated paperboard
US 1504218 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ugm RZ MEM C. H. CROWELL PROCESS AND MACHINE Fon MAKING cRoss CORRUGATED PAPER BOARD Filed .nine s Patented Aug. i2, i924.

PROCESS AND MACHINE FOR MAKING CROSS-CORRUGATED PAPERBOARD.

Application led June 5,

T o all 1li/10m t may concern.'

Be it known that l, CHARLES H. CnowELL, a citizen of the United States, and resident of the borough of Brooklyn, county of Kings, city and State of New York, have made a certain new and useful Invention Rel-ating to Processes and Machines for Making Cross-Corrugated Faperboard, of which the following is a specification taken .in connection with the accompanying drawing.

This invention relates especially to processes and machines for making cross corrugated paper board for fiber shipping containers, etc., the corrugated paper liner forming the transverse corrugations being continuously fed into the machine in the form of a web and adhesively secured betweenfacing sheets as by silicate of soda or 2O other adhesive. The longitudinally corrugated liner is preferably supplied in the form of lengths or strips of the longest convenient length that can be formed by transversely corrugating a wide web of suitable paper and then cutting the web into strips of the width desired in the cross corrugated -paper to be produced. In this way the strips may have a length of one hundred inches more or less when wide webs are cor- 30 rugated for this purpose and these strips may be adhesively connected or spliced together as by being manually or mechanically placed with slightly overlapping ends as they are continuously fed into the assembling machine between corrugatedl splicing and feeding rolls, for instance, so as to be assembled between two of the facing sheets yof suitable paper and adhesively securedl thereto. lift is advantageous to feed the asf sembled elements forward through suitable feeding and holding' belts or guides and simultaneously dry the adhesive by blowing hot air through the assembled corrugated .paper board for which purpose an initial "t5 pressure or exhaust chamber may be arranged where the elements are assembled so as to effect the movement of drying currents of hot air longitudinally through the spaces left around` the longitudinally corrugated liner, this drying medium thus passing in either ldirection through the length of assembled corrugated paper board up to the point where it is cut or sheeted into the lengths desired. Currents of hot air may 5i' also be passed transversely through the as- 1923. Serial No. 643,590.

sembled board so as to pass around the transverse channelsl formed in connection with the transversely corrugated liner niatcrial and. for this purpose heated air may be blown in one or both directions through these transverse channels after the paper has been assembled and during its forward movement.

ln the accompanying drawing showing in a somewhat diagrammatic way various illustrative embodiments and arrangements of this invention--v Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic sectional elevation showing an illustrative machine. I

Fig. 2 is an enlarged horizontal section showing the drying devices.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail section therethrough taken along the line 3-3 of Flg. 2, and

Fig. 4 is alongitudinal' detail section taken along the line 4.-4 of Fig. 3.

As indicated diagrammatically in Fig. 1 the web 6 of transversely corrugated. straw board paper or other suitable material may i be continuously fed into the machine by any suitable means as the guiding and feeding rolls. 17, 18, 19. This liner web may then pass between the gluing rolls 20 to apply thereto the desired quantities of any suitable adhesive such as silicate of soda, gum or glue' compositions. rlhis adhesive maybe supplied to these rolls 20 by the cooperating rolls 21, 23 in the tanks 22, 24 of adhesive. Facing webs of the desired grade of facing or lining paper may be continuously fed into the machine on cach side of this transversely corrugated web 6 and, for instance, the facing web 26 may be fed from the roll 25 over the guide roll 27 so as to be supplied above the corrugated web 6 while a similar facing web 33 from the roll 32 may.pass between the guide rolls 79, 80 so as to be forced against the lower side of this corrugated liner.

The longitudinally corrugated liner material may be supplied to the machine 1n long lengths such as 1 which may be spliced together in any desired way as by applying silicate or other adhesive to a short portion 2 at one end of these-strips and then manually or mechanically overlapping it slightly with the preceding strip 3 so that the strips are forced tightly together and spliced as they pass through the splicing and .feeding rolls 5, 7 formed with corresponding circumferential corrugations. This longitudinally corrugated liner 3 may thus be continuously fed forward over suitable guide rolls such as 81 and adhesive such as silicate or the like may be applied to both sides by gumming rolls such as 9, 10 supplied with silicate Aor other `adhesive from the ytanks 14 through suitable supply rolls 11,

12. This liner is then assembled between the central lining web 26 and the upper lining or facing web 16 as thematerial is continuously fed between the rolls 27, the completely `assembled cross corrugated board thereafter passing between the assembling belts or guides such as the belts 28,29 passing over guide rolls such as 78, 79 so as to ress the assembled webs together with t e desired force in connection with suitable rolls orl spring supported guides such as 31, for instance, as the belts pass over the table or support 30. These assembling belts are preferably amply long to preliminarily set the adhesive so as to hold the elements together before the cor-4 rugated board then passes into one or more drying chambers such as 34 where air blasts or other means are used to still more thoroughly dry the adhesive used. For this purpose similar belts such as 35, 36, 40,- 41 may be used to support and feed along the assembled paper board over such supports or tables as 37, a series of presser rolls 38 being arranged above this run of the upper belts,l if desired. As shownin greater detail in Figs. 2, 3 and .4, heated air or other drying medium may be blown through the transverse channels 110 aroundJ the transversely corrugated liner 6. For this purpose a suitable heater 53 may communicate with `theblower 52 which may have its discharge pipe 51 connected with a distributor 55 which lits between the two adjacent edges of the belts 35, 36 as is shown in Fig. 3. This hot air is thus forced through any transverse channels in the paper board and is thus blown through the channels 110 shown' in greater detail in Fig. 4 so as to dry the adjacent elements lof ythe paper board. A similar heater 50 and blower 49 may be arranged on the other side of the assembled paper board in connection with a discharge pipe 42 and spreader 54 to supply the heated drying medium to the other edges so as to hold the paper board together at these points and counteract any tendency for the elements to separate.

The paper board may then be passed through suitable feed rolls as 43 shown at the right of Fig. 1 and may then be cut or sheeted into pieces of the desired length by any suitable mechanism, illustrated dia grammatically as comprising a reciprocating cutter carriage 66 which may be reciprocated longitudinally of the paper board sheet or web by any suitable devices such as the crank 104 and connecting rod 105, connected to the projection or bracket. 1,06 on the carriage. Any suitable gearing such as 107 may operate this carriage mechanism in unison with the feed rolls 43, 55, 56 so as to have the carriage moving substantially in unison with the paper board when the cutter wheels or knife 57 are forced don-n through the paperboard by any suitable mechanism such as 5,8, 6,5 of the desired' construction. Where rotary knives are used to sever the paper board web clean cuts may be made therethrough so as to leave open the4 longitudinal channels and this is quite desirable since hot air or other drying medium may advantageously be fed through the channels around the lon itudinally corrugated liner 3 as shown in Fig. 3.

For this purpose hot air may be 'supplied to these channels at either end of the web of paper board by means of a chamber such as '77 which may, for example, enclose the assembling and gluing mechanismsothat air may be exhausted therefrom or forced into the same to effect the desired longitudinally moving air currents through the paper board. In this instance a blower 15 may force heated air into this chamber tbroug the passage 8 so that it may enter the longih los tudinal channels around the liner 3 and dry these elements in the desired adhesive engagement which is maintained by the guiding and holding belts orother means referred to. Of course such a chamber as 77 is preferably substantially sealed and the' -various rolls such as 5, 7, and 80 form substantially tight contact with the walls of this chamber to prevent leakage of air there-V from.

This invention has been described in connection with a number of illustrative embodiments, forms, portions, parts, materials, arrangements and methods of manufacture and use, to the details of which disclosure the invention is not of course to be limited, since wliat is claimed as new and what is desired to be secured by Letters Patent is set forth in the appended claims:

1. The process of making cross corrugated paper board, which comprises forming transverse corrugations in a web of liner paper and cutting therefrom long longitudinally corrugated strips assembling' said liner neonata strips substantially end to end and adhesively splicing them together, continuously feeding forward said liner strips and a continuous web of transversely corrugated paper liner 'and applying adhesive to said liners, feeding. webs of paper facing between and outside said liners to form a continuous web of cross corrugated paper board and holding the same in assembled position and forcing hot drying gases through the transverse and longitudinal channels around said liners to dry the adhesive inthe moving papel; board and cutting thesame into sheets when substantially dried.

2. The process of making cross corrugated paper board, which comprises forming transverse corrugations in a web of liner paper and' cutting therefrom longitudinally corrugated strips assembling said liner strips substantially end to end, continuously feeding forward said liner strips and a continuous web of transversely corrugated paper liner, feeding webs of paper facing between and outside said liners and uniting them thereto to form a continuous web of cross corrugated paper board and holding the same in assembled position and forcing hot drying gases through the channels around said liners to dry the adhesive in the moving paper board.

3. rllhe process of making corrugated paper board, which comprises forming transverse corrugations in a wide web of liner paper and cutting therefrom longitudinally corrugated strips assembling said liner strip-s substantially end to end, continuously feeding forward said liner and a continuous web of transversely corrugated paper liner, feeding webs of paper facing on both sides of each of said liners and adhesively securing lthe same thereto to form a continuous web of cross corrugated paper board and holding the same in assembled position to set the adhesive and drying the paper board.

4. rllhe process of making corrugated paper board, which comprises forming transverse corrugations in a web of liner paper and cutting therefrom longitudinally corrugated strips, assembling said liner strips i substantially end to end, continuously feeding forward said assembled liner, feeding webs of paper facing on both sides of said liner and adhesively securing the same thereto to form a continuous web of corrugated paper bo-ard and holding the same in assembled position to set the adhesive.

5. rlfhe process of making corrugated paper board, which comprises forming transverse corrugations in a web of liner paper and cutting therefrom longitudinally corrugated strips, assembling said line-r strips substantially end to end, and splicing them together continuously feeding forward said assembled liner, feeding webs of paper facing on both sides of said liners and adhesively securing the saine thereto to form a continuous web of corrugated paper board and holding the same in assembled position to set the adhesive.

6. The process of making corrugated paper board, which comprises assembling substantially end to end and splicing together strips of longitudinally corrugated paper liner, continuously feeding forward said assembled liner and applying adhesive thereto, feeding webs of paper facing on both sides of said liner to form a continuous web of corrugated paper board and holding the same in assembled position and forcing hot drying gases through the longitudinal channels aro-und said liner to dry the adhesive in the moving paper board and cutting the same into sheets when substantially dried.

7. rlthe process of making corrugated paper board, which comprises assembling substan- -tially end to en and splicing together strips of longitudinally corrugated paper liner, feeding forward said liner and applying adhesive thereto, feeding webs of paper facing on borth sides of said liner to form a contlnuous web of corrugated paper board and forcing hot drying gases through the longitudinal channels around said liner to dry the adhesive in the paper board.

8. The continuous process of making cross corrugated paper board, which comprises assembling lsubstantially end to end and adhesively splicing together long strips of longitudinally corrugated paper liner, continuously feeding forward said liner and a continuous web of transversely corrugated paper liner, feeding webs of paper facing between and outside said liners and adhesively securing them. thereto to form a continuous web of cross corrugated paper board and holding .the same in assembled position and forcing Ihot drying gases through` the transverse and longitudinal channels around said liners to dry the adhesive in the moving paper board and cutting the same into sheets when substantially dried.

9. The continuous process of making cross corrugated paper board, which comprises assembling substantially end to end and splicing together strips of longitudinally corrugated paper liner, continuously feeding forward said liner and a continuous web of vtransversely corrugated paper liner. feeding webs of paperl facing between and ofutside said liners and adhesively securing them thereto to form a continuous web of cross corrugated paper board and holding the same invv assembled position and forcing hot drying gases through the channels around said liners to dry the adhesive in the moving paper board.

10. The process of making cross corrugated paper board, which comprises assemblin longitu inally corrugated per liner, feeding forward said liner yan a web of transversely corrugated paper liner and applying `adhesive to said liners, feedin webs of paper facing between and outside said liners to form a continuous web of cross corrugated pap r board and holding the same in assem led position, drying the paper board and cutting the same into sheets.

11. The process of making cross corrugated paper board, which comprises assembling and splicing together strips of longitudinally, corrugated paper liner, feeding forward said liner and a web of transversely corrugated pa er liner, feeding webs of paper facing between and outside said liners and uniting themfthereto to form a continuous web of crosscorrugated paper board drying the paper board.

12. In machines for making cross corrugated pa er board, circumferentially corrugated sp icing rolls to splice andy continuouslyfeed forward str-ips of lon itudinally corru ated paper liner, gluing rolls to apply adhesive to both sides of said liner, means to continuously feed and apply adhesive to a transversely corrugated web of pa er liner, feeding rolls to feed between an on the outside of said liners paper facing webs to form a continuous web of cross corrugated paper board, feedin belts and guides to ho d said paper boar in assembled position and continuously feed the same forward, and drying means including a substantiall airtight chamber provided with air'circu ating devices around the assembling webs to force Y blasts of hot drying medium through the transverse and longitudinal channels around said liners to dry the adhesive in the moving paper board, and means to cut the assembled and substantially dried paper board into sheets.

13. -In machines for making cross corrugated pa er board, circumferentially corrugated sp icing rolls to splice and continuously feed forward strips of longitudinally corrugated paper liner, gluing rolls to apply adhesive to both sides of said liner, means to continuously feed and apply adhesive to a transversely corrugated web of aper liner, feeding rolls to feed between an on the outside of said liners paper facing webs to form a continuous web of cross corrugated aper board, feeding belts and guides to hold) said paper board 1n assembled Vposition and con# tinuously feed the same forward, and drying means including air circulating devices to force blasts of hot drying medium through d. the transverse and longitudinal channels around said liners to dry the adhesive inthe movin paper board, and means to cut the assemble .paper board into sheets.

14;. In machines for making cross corrugated paper board means to splice and feed and splicing together strips of necaaie forward strips of longitudinally corrugated paper liner, gluing rolls to apply adhesive to both sides of said liner, means to continuously feed and apply adhesive to a transversely corrugated web of paper liner, feeding rolls to feed between and on the outside of said liners paper facing webs to form a continuous web of cross corrugated paper board and drying means to force blasts of hot drying medium through the transverse and longitudinal channels around said liners to set or dry the adhesive in the moving paper board, and means to cut paper board from said web.

15. In machines for making cross corrugated paner board, means to feed forward strips of longitudinally corrugated paper liner, gluing rolls to apply adhesive to both sides of sald liner, means to continuously feed and apply adhesive to a transversely corrugated web of aper liner, means to feed between and on t e outside of said liners paper facing webs to form a continuous web of cross corrugated paper board, and drying means to set or dry the adhesive in the moving paper board, and means to cut paper board from said web.

16. In machines for making cross corruated paper board, means to feed strips of ongitudinally corrugated paper liner and apply adhesive to both sides of said liner, means to feed and apply adhesive to a transversely corrugated web of paper liner, means to feed between and on the outside of said liners paper facing webs to form a web of cross corrugated paper board, and drying means including a substantially airtight chamber provided with air circulating devices around one end of said continuous web to force blasts of hot drying medium through the lon ltudinal channels around said longitudina y corrugated liner to set or dry the adhesive thereon, and means to cut paper board from said web.

17. In machines for making cross corrugated paper board, means to feed strips of lon itudinally corrugated paper liner and app y adhesive to both sides of said liner, means to feed and ap ly adhesive to a transversely corrugated we of paper liner, means to feed said liners paper facing webs to form a web of cross corrugated paper board, and drying means to force blasts of hot drying medium through the longitudinal channels around said longitudinally corrugated liner to set or dry the adhesive thereon.

18. In machines for making corrugated palper board, circumferentially corrugated sp icing rolls to splice and continuously feed forward strips of longitudinally corrugated.

aper liner, luin rolls to apply adhesive fb both sdesgof saiigdliner, means to feed to said liner paper facing webs to form a continuous web of corrugated paper board, feeding belts to hold said paper board in asmais sembled position and continuously feed the same forward, and drying means including a substantially airtight chamber provided with air circulating devices around one end of said continuous Web to force blasts of hot drying medium through the channels around said liner to set or dry the adhesive in the moving paper board, and means to cut paper board from said web.

19. ln machines for making corrugated paper board, circumferentially corrugated splicing rolls to splice and feed forward strips of longitudinally corrugated paper liner means to feed into Contact with and adhesively secure to said liner paper Webs to form a continuous web of corrugated paperboard, and drying means to force blasts of hot drying medium through the channels around said liner to set or dry the adhesive in the movirg paper board, and 2e means to cut paper boar from said web.

CLES H. GRUWELL.

facing M

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2554035 *Sep 3, 1946May 22, 1951Philadelphia Quartz CoManufacture of combined paperboard and silicate-clay adhesives therefor
US2865408 *Nov 15, 1955Dec 23, 1958Victor Balata & Textile BeltinCorrugator double-backer blanket
US2876555 *Oct 8, 1956Mar 10, 1959Fram CorpMethod of curing porous, resin-treated pleated paper
US3892619 *Jan 25, 1971Jul 1, 1975Siempelkamp Gmbh & CoApparatus for making laminated pressed board
US4125424 *May 4, 1977Nov 14, 1978Amerace CorporationApparatus for fabricating battery plate sleeves
US4126508 *Sep 13, 1976Nov 21, 1978Boise Cascade CorporationApparatus for forming multi-flute-layer corrugated board
US4128677 *Mar 23, 1978Dec 5, 1978Boise Cascade CorporationContinuous wev
US4547254 *Sep 24, 1982Oct 15, 1985Ecoboard LimitedApparatus for bonding sheet material
US4657611 *Nov 28, 1984Apr 14, 1987Kaser Associates, Inc.Cross corrugated fiberboard and method and apparatus for making the same
US4838985 *May 8, 1987Jun 13, 1989Constantinos KaragiannisApparatus for coating and laminating sheet materials
US5181330 *Nov 8, 1991Jan 26, 1993Bobst SaDevice for assembling superposed, glued web-like layers
US5183525 *May 24, 1990Feb 2, 1993United Container Machinery Group, Inc.Heater for a double facing corrugating machine
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US6488800 *May 5, 2000Dec 3, 2002Firma Theodor HynmenMethod for changing pulling off a cover web of a production roll to a storing roll
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US20100319505 *Sep 2, 2008Dec 23, 2010Ronald CelesteDevice and method for conveying a paper web
EP0078560A1 *Oct 15, 1982May 11, 1983Ecoboard LimitedMethod and device for glueing several webs of material
EP0129641A2 *Mar 14, 1984Jan 2, 1985Werner H. K. Peters Maschinenfabrik GmbHInstallation for corrugated cardboard
EP0485731A1 *Oct 4, 1991May 20, 1992Bobst S.A.Assembly device for machine for the production of corrugated cardboard
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Classifications
U.S. Classification156/207, 156/504, 156/381, 156/266, 156/551
International ClassificationB31F1/28, B31F1/20
Cooperative ClassificationB31F1/285, B31F1/2813
European ClassificationB31F1/28C, B31F1/28J2