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Publication numberUS1504507 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1924
Filing dateJan 10, 1920
Priority dateJan 10, 1920
Publication numberUS 1504507 A, US 1504507A, US-A-1504507, US1504507 A, US1504507A
InventorsEdward E Richardson
Original AssigneeR & S Valve Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Engine valve
US 1504507 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Y E. E. RICHARDSO'N BNGINE VALVE 2 Shoots-Shani Filed Jan. 10. 1920 YINVENTOR Ms A TTORNEYJJ' E. E. RICHARDSON ENGINE VALVE Aug. 12; 1924. 1,504,507

Filed Jan. 10. 19?" 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 l o l O 1 N VEN TOR.

H15 ATTORNEYS Patented Aug. 12, 192410 racist? EDWARD E. RICHARDSON, (3F TGLEDO, OHIO, ASS'IGNOB, BY DIR-E61 AND MESNE AS- SIGNMENTS, TO THE 3?]. e: S VALVE COMPANY, OF ELYBIA, OHIO, A CORPORATION OF OHIO.

nnernn VALVE.

Application filed January 10, 1920.

T all to hem it may concern Be it known that I, EDWARD E. RIGHARD- SON, a citizen of the United States, residing at Toledo, in the county of Lucas and State of Ohio, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Engine Valves; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make anduse the same.

This invention relates to throttle or governing valves for engines of various types, but is particularly adapted to explosion engines. Throttle valves for explosion engines consist, generally, of circular vanes inside a casing having a circular passage. When the vane or butterfly-valve is rotated to the open position, the or fuel mixture passes along both sides of the vane in substantially equal volume. Two streams of gas, therefore, are directed past the valve and these flow along the side walls and encounter a maximum amount of frictional resistance. The velocity of the gas streams is, therefore, reduced and condensation on thepassage walls takes place, to a considerable extent. This type of valve is not all that could be desired for any kind of throttle control of gas engines, and it is especially unsatisfactory for the so-called governor control, where a speed governor is used to throttle the gas, in addition to the usual hand control, as the two controls cause an excessive amount of condensation. For this reason, a great deal of trouble has been experienced with governor control of gas engine throttles.

It is the object of my invention to over come these disadvantages, as well as others referred to in the following description, reference being had to the drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a side view of my improvement with the cover plate removed.

Fig. 2 is a sectional plan line A-A of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a sectional elevation taken on the line B- B of Fig. 2. Fig. 4. is a "perspective view of the vane or shutter.

taken on the serial No. 350,696.

. Fig. 5 is a modification-showing a slightly different valve operating device,

Fig. 6 shows the securing means tain screws.

Referring to the drawings, the valve consists preferably of two parts 1 and 2 having a chamber 3 of rectangular cross section. The two sectlonsare secured together by any means, such as screws 5. The sections '1 and 2 have standard size couplings 9 and 10 for attaching to the cylinder block of the engine and to thecarburetor, or to any other desired part of the engine. Suitable holes 11 are made in the fittings: 9 and 10 to permit the valve to be clamped in position.

I have shown the couplings with lugs or ears through which the connecting bolts 8 (one only being shown) are adapted to pass. These bolts extend not only through the connections9 and 10, but also through the flanges of the carburetor and intake pipe or other part of the engine to which they are clamped. In this way the bolts hold the sections 1 and 2 tightly together in addition to clamping the valve casing to the-engine parts. It is, therefore, necessary to use only a few screws, such as 5, as these will be needed in order to keep the parts together only when the valve casing is removed from the engine. By constructfor cering the connecting flanges in this way, the

vanes or shutters 14, 1'5 and for ease of assembly, I prefer to make the bearings "by drilling out holes 17 18, 20 and 21in the two blocks alongthe center line 16, shown more clearly in Fig. 3. The journals .or

shafts .of the shutters are. secured to pinion memb rs 2g, "2a, which mesh "with ar a;

member 25. The casing members 1 and 2 have a gear housing 26 for the reception of the pinion and rack members, as shown clearly in Figs. 1 and 2. The end wall 27 of the housing has a slot 28 adapted to per 'mit the end 27 of the rack; member 25 to slide therein, while the other wall 29 of the housing has'a slot30 receiving a projection 31 on the other end of the member. The rack 25 is provided with a slot,

and the opposite walls are provided with teeth 33, 34:, which mesh with the teeth on the pinion members 23, 24:- A cover plate35 (Fig. 6) is'secured onthe housing walls by suitable screws 32 adapted to threa into holes '32. w a

The casing member 2 has seat members 39 and to on its side walls41, 42 and the seating surfaces on these are substantially concent *ie with the axes 43, 44: of theshutters. The shutters have curved bottom wings 63, ehpreferably made concentric with the axes referred to, and the arrangement is such that these make a snug moving fit with the seating surface on the side wall projections.

In order "to pass the major portion of the fuel mixture through the center of the passa the seat members 39 and project sufficiently inwardly from the side walls il V }and 42- to' permit the top or leading wings trailing wings 7 ofthe shutters canbe broughtinto contact .with eachother. However, it is not always desirable to completely close the throttle 'Tvalveof a gas engine, and, of course, when- ,Q ever desired,cthe valves can be adjusted to 3 as, 46 to have considerable movement to and from theclosed position before the bottom' wings leave the valve seats. With this construction the gas wlllpass entirely between the upper wings. of the shutters for'a con- ;siderable'range of speed of the engine,-which a minimum closed position by a suitable screw stop 52. Thls screw ad ustment is preferably enclosed in the housing 26and sealing wire 58 may be passed through the screw heads 32 to prevent unauthorized fltampering. with the adjustment -when the cover s in position. To further prevent tampering, a tube member 54 may. enclose the rack end 27. and the governor connection (not shown). Screws 55 may thread eway, indicated bytheffull line arrow,

into the holes 56 in the housing wall 27 to secure the tube 54. in position. Sealing means may also be used to prevent the removal of these screws, if desired.

"Various changes may be made in the valve arrangement, and another embodiment is shown in Fig. 5. In this embodiment the pinion members and 56 secured to the shutters are 01 erated by a rack member 57 passing between them.

My improved valve casing can be readily die-cast and no machine will be required. The cost of manufacture will, therefore, be low.

The slides 25 and 57 may be connected to the hand throttle for controlling the engine, or they may be connected to any suitable governor to limit the speed of the engine, as'is quite common, especially in trucks. By moving the control towards the open position, the rack members 25 will be forced to the right in Fig. 1 and the pinion members 23, 2 1- will move simultaneously counterclockwise and clockwise, respectively. This will move the shutter 14 counter-clockwise and the shutter 15 clockwise and permit fuel mixture to pass between the top wings a. The stream of gas mixture will be directed through the center of the passageway, as indicated by the arrow in Fig. 3, and will meet with minimum resistance, as skin friction from the casing walls will be absent. To increase the fuel mixture, the rack member can be shoved farther to the right and permit more and more mixture to pass between the top wings (1., until finally the bottom wings 1) pass off of the curved surfaces of the seats or pro ections 39, 40. Fuel mixture will then commence to pass to the outside of the shutters, but the resistance of the chamber walls will be much reduced, as there is a wide channel for the outer streams of gas, due to the projecting seat members sealing the passage until the lower wings are a considerable distance from the chamber walls. The path of the gas is not along the side walls, but follows the line of the dotted arrows in Fig. 3.

i The operation of the modification shown in Fig. 5 will be evident from what has already been described, but it may be briefly said that since the rack 57 engages with opposite sides of the pinion members 55 and 56, movement of the rack Jill simultaneously move the vanes in opposite directions in the same manner as in the first modification.

My improved form of throttle valve has been found to be especially suited for explosion engines, as there is substantially no skin friction from the casing walls. Condensation is, therefore, materially reduced, or entirely eliminated in the neighborhood of the valves. Consequently, superior results are obtained.

While I have shown particular embodiments of my invention, it will be apparent that various other changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Having described my invention, what I claim is:

l. in engine valves, a casing having a chamber, a plurality of shutters journalled in said chamber and snugly fitting the end walls thereof, means for rotating said shutters simultaneously in opposite directions, and seats projecting inwardly from the side walls of said chamber and being adapted to engage certain wings of adjacent shutters before the other wings engage with each other.

2. In engine valves, a casing having a chamber, a plurality of shutters in said chamber and snugly fitting the end walls thereof, journals on the ends of said vanes, means for rotating said vanes simultaneously in opposite directions, and curved seats projecting inwardly from the side walls of said chamber, the curvature of each seat having a center in the journal of the adjacent shutter.

3. In engine valves, a casing having a chamber, a plurality of shutters therein, journals attached to the ends of said shutters and dividing them into two wings, the edges of certain of said wings being curved about said journals, and the edges of others of said wings being bevelled, means for rotating said shutters simultaneously in opposite directions, and seats projecting from the side walls of said chamber and having surfaces curved about adjacent journals to engage said curved edges on the wings before the bevelled edges of the vanes enga e each other.

4. In engine valves, a casing having a chamber, two shutters therein, journals attached to the ends of said shutters and dividing them into two wings, and having bearings in the end walls of said chamber, the edges of the bottom wings having centers of curvature in said journals, and the edges of the top wings being bevelled, means for rotating said vanes simultaneously in opposite directions, seats projecting from the side walls of said chamber having surfaces curved about adjacent journals and being adapted to engage the bottom portions of adjacent vanes before the said bevelled edges engage with each other.

5. The combination with a valve casing, of a plurality of rotatable vane members mounted in a passage of the said casing, each vane being adapted to rotate about an individual axis located intermediate its ends, side wall projections of the said casing, means to simultaneously rotate the vanes on their axes to cause adjoining vane ends to form a closed connection and to move the opposite ends of vanes next adjacent the side wall projections over the surfaces of the said projections.

6. The method of operating an internal combustion engine valve, consisting in first opening the center of the valve passage, then gradually increasing the area of the center opening, and finally, after a predetermined center opening, opening another valve passage section, said operations being performed by a continuous movement of the same mechanism.

7. The method of operating an internal combustion engine valve, consisting in first opening the center of the valve passage, then gradually increasing the area of the center opening, and finally, after a predetermined center opening, opening side valve passage sections, said operations being performed by a continuous movement of the same mechanism.

8. The method of operating an internal combustion engine valve, consisting in first opening the center of the valve passage, then gradually increasing the area of the center opening, then, after a predetermined center opening, opening side valve passage sections, and then gradually increasing the area of all the valve passage openings, said operations being performed by a continuous movement of the same mechanism.

9. In combination with a valve casing, of a plurality of rotatable vane members mounted in a. passage of the said casing, each vane being adapted to rotate about an individual axis located intermediate its ends, side wall projections of the said casing, adjusting means to simultaneously rotate the vanes on their axes to cause adjoining vane ends to form a closed connection and to move the outer end of each of said vanes over a surface of one of said projections.

10. The combination with a valve casing, of a plurality of rotatable vane members mounted in a passage of the said casing, each vane being adapted to rotate about an individual axis, the axis of each of said vanes being located intermediate the sides of and at the ends of each vane, side wall projections of the said casing, means to simultaneously rotate in opposite directions each of the said pair of vanes on its axis to cause their approaching vane ends to form a closed connection and to move the receding ends of the said pair of vanes each over a surface of an adjacent one of the said projections.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 6th day of January, 1920.

EDWARD E. RICHARDSQN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2500088 *May 31, 1944Mar 7, 1950Bendix Aviat CorpCharge forming device
US3746042 *Nov 22, 1971Jul 17, 1973Swift Sheetmetal CorpMulti-blade damper
US4066721 *Aug 30, 1976Jan 3, 1978Chrysler CorporationThrottle body having a novel throttle blade
US4570493 *Mar 11, 1985Feb 18, 1986Leemhuis Louis JVariable orifice air flow measuring device and method
US20090264063 *May 30, 2007Oct 22, 2009Barton TinsleyGear Drive Damper
Classifications
U.S. Classification251/212, 251/250, 251/284, 251/229, 137/625.31, 251/215, 261/65
International ClassificationF02M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M2700/4323, F02M1/00
European ClassificationF02M1/00