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Publication numberUS1507949 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 9, 1924
Filing dateFeb 24, 1922
Priority dateFeb 24, 1922
Publication numberUS 1507949 A, US 1507949A, US-A-1507949, US1507949 A, US1507949A
InventorsEdward H Angier
Original AssigneeEdward H Angier
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elastic paper sheathing and method for producing the same
US 1507949 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 9 1924.

E. H. ANGIER ELSTIC PAPER SHEATHING AND METHOD FOR PRODUCING THE SAME Filed Feb. 24. 1922 2 Sheets-Sheet l rll l .....na

E. H. ANGIER Sept. 9, 1924.

ELASTIC PAPER SHEATHING AND METHOD FOR PRODUCING THE SAME Filed Feb. 24 1922 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 7 all .ilnllull [avai/ana' aid Edu'

H@ by@ Ms/Mw f- #T7 Patented Sept. 9, 1924.

UNITED STATES .EDWARD H. ANGIER, OF FRAMINGHAM, MASSACHUSETFS.

ELASTIC PAPER SHEATHING AND METHIOD FOR PRODUCING THE SAME.

Application led February 24, 1922. Serial No. 538,921.

To all whom z't may concern Be it known that I, EDWARD H. ANGIER, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Framingham, county of Middlesex, and State of Massachusetts, have invented an VImprovement in Elastic Paper Sheathings and Methods for Producing the Same, of which the following description, in connection with the accompanying drawings. is a specification, like characters lon the drawingslepresenting like parts.

This invention relates to paper sheathing for the protection of various kinds of goods or articles, such sheathing being useful either as an external covering for. the goods or as a lining for a more or less rigid container in which the goods are placed for shipment or storage. j

Many articles and many-kinds of goods need to be protected from contact with other articles or objects, and for such purposes it is customary to employ paper either as an enclosure in the form of a bag `or tube, or as a lining within some container such as a barrel or bucket. For many classes of merchandise it is desirable that the paper shall be elastic, particularly in the direction of the width of the sheath or lining, in order to accommodate itself to the internal shape of the container employed or to the external shape of the article enclosed by the sheath.

The present invention relates to the production of elastic paper sheathings for the purposes above mentioned and the object is to effect such production in a rapid, accurate and economical manner. The invention will best be understood by reference to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a partly broken fragmentary plan view illustrating an intermediate stage 1n the production of sheaths in accordance with my invention;

Fig. 2 is a similar view showing a later stage;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a sheath constructed as shown in Figs. 1 and 2 and 'adapted for use as a barrel liner;

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 1 illustrative of anothermethod of manufacture in accordance with my invention;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating still another method of proceedm Fig. 6 s a. perspectiveview of a roll of sheaths adapted to be cut or torn' off one by l one as required;

Fig. 7 is a perspective lview illustrating a variation of Fi 5;

Fig. 8 is a similr view showing a further variation; and l Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 4.illustrat ing a step in the production of sheaths for tennis rackets.

The showing of'craping in Figs. 2, 3 and 6' is diagrammatic and muchl exaggerated (the perforations 15. The two sheets 9 and 11 secured together in face to face contact are then subjected as a unit to a craping operation as, for instance, by passing the united sheets through a suitable bath and craping'them with roll and doctor in well known fashion to provide crapings runnin generally transversely of the two unite webs. The ,product of thisoperation is shown in Fig. 2 which in contrast with Fig.

1 shows how the paper is shortened by the process. It remains, however, capable of stretching out in well known manner with considerable resiliency.

The web may then bedivided transversely along the united areas 13, conveniently centrally thereof, and the lines of weakness 15, if present, will permit the se ments of the web to be torn olf or facih.-

tate the cutting. There is thus produced a fiat tube of paper as shown in Fig. 3 consisting of two side portions 9 and 11 united along the edges 'by adhesive seams. The

suprposed/layers of paper in these seamsf have .been craped as a unit and therefore the crapings of these portions are nested one within the other and the two layers of paper are interlocked in this manner as well as secured by thel adhesive joint. The result is a; joint of great strength as the adhesive was applied smoothly over the is capable of expansion since it partakes of the craping of the rest of the sheet. Con-- sequently a localized strain is not so applied as to start a break in the lioint but is distributed throughout the width ci, the

seam and also to laterally adjacent portions thereof.

The article produced as described may be opened out as shown in Fig. 3 for use as a barrel liner. For such use a disc of paper would iirst be laid in the bottom ot the barrel and then a' tube placed inside the same. If the barrel is then iilled' with some pulverant or granular material, such as sugar, the crapings will permit it to expand to the form oi the barrel without breaking and provide a liningfor the same eifectually preventing sifting of the Ycontents between the staves. i

The tube shownl in Fig. 3 is open at both ends. To form a' bag a tube may be produced closed at one end 4and for such purpose the webs of paper may be united by one or more longitudinal stripes oi adhesive connecting the transverse stripes. In Fig. 4 I have shown an arrangement wherein two webs of paper 9 and 11 are united by a central longitudinal stripe 16 of adhesive intersecting the transverse stripes 13 corresponding tothe stripes 13 in Figs. 1 and 2. In Fig. 4 the web may be divided centrally of the stripes 12'a and centrally of the stripe 16 providing bags with closed bottoms of a depth equal to halt the width of the web. Of course, a variation in the position of the Stripe 16 varies the width ot the bag formed and in the limiting case the stripe would be applied at one edge of the webs and the bags would be fewer innumber but of the full depth ot the width ot the webs.

in Figs. 1, 2 and Ll the two layers of paper are separate webs but tor certain purposesv they may be made by folding a single web on itself and the iolded edge may be'utilized as a marginal portion of the completed sheath. Referring to Fig. 5, l have shown a web oi paper 17 having A both edge portions folded over on the iace providing folded edges 19 and 21. and united by transverse stripes oi adhesive 23. Such a web may be craped and divided along the middle where the folded over edges meet and transversely along the stripes 23 providing bags having adhesive seams at the sides and folded at the bottom, these bags being of a height equal to half the width of the olded web. ln llig. 7 a web 17a is Moneta Shown folded downing middle to provide one folded edge 19a, the two portions of the' web being united by transverse stripes of adhesive 23a. -lf this web is craped and- ,center long tubes having one folded and one adhesively secured edge are provided which is an example of afolded joint combined with a longitudinal adhesive joint.

in the construction described the adhesive is applied in regular lines and the sheathings produced are correspondingly regular. To protect articles which are irregular in form, for instance, to provide sheathngs for um'- brellas, guns, tennis rackets, or the like, the adhesive joints and the lines of. severance may be more or less irregular corresponding to the proper contour ofV the desired sheath and a folded edge portion similar to 19 and 21 in Fig. 5 maybe utilized in combination with an adhesive suitably applied to a limited area of the paper to define all or a portion of the contour of any desired shape of sheath. ln Fig. 9 I show twov webs 9c and 11 joined by adhesive along areas 13 which are of suitable contour to provide when the webs are cut, partly along the contours 13' and partly along lines 27, open ended sheaths each adapted to tit a tennis racket.

in Fig. 6 l have illustrated the craped double web shown in Fig. 2 as rolled up may be divided into suitable lengths. rlhis providing a supply from which individual oi barrels to be lined also known, the total length of dat paper required to Vll the order can be determined by simply adding to the total oi all the internal semi-circumierences enough to slightly exceed the measurement required to allow for the. Widths `ot the transverse stripes 13 and any desired residual craping. No matter how much the duplex paper is afterwards shortened by the craping process, each'sheath or lining will be capable of stretching to bear against the inner surface of the barrel. A lf a customer wishes a twenty per cent stretch to allow for the bilge of the barrels, this can be allowed for when the paper is fiat and the correct result obtained. For all pur oses it is easy to estimate how much paper s all be allowed for those areas which are not adhesively united so that those areas,

after craping, will stretch without tearing when applied to iinal use.

Having described in detail certain illustrative embodiments of my invention.' in order to indicate the varied operations which may be followed and within the scope thereof, the principles exemplified thereby which I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent I shall express in the following claims.

Claims:

1. The method of making elastic bagshaped articles, consisting in adhesively uniting two layers of paper on transverse lines at spaced intervals, craping the united layers and dividing the. product at points intermediate the margins of the adhesively united areas.

2. The method of making elastic bagshaped articles, consisting in adhesively uniting two layers of paper longitudinally and on transverse lines at spaced-intervals, craping the united layers and dividing the product at points intermediate'the margins of the adhesively united areas.

3. The method of forming elastic sheaths characterized by adhesively uniting two layers of paper in face to face contact along limited areas corresponding to at least a p art of the contour of the sheath, craping the assembly and cutting out the sheaths at least partly along the said areas.

4. The method of making elastic sheaths characterized by foldin a layer of paper upon itself and adhesive y uniting the folded portions in face to face contact along lim1tedareas defining in cooperation with the folded, edge at least part of the contour of the sheet, craping the assembly and cutting out the sheaths at least partly along the said areas.

5. The method .of forming elastic bagshaped articles characterized by folding a layer of paper lengthwise on itself and adhesively uniting the folded portions in face to face contact in spaced transversely extending zones, craplng the assembly and dividing the same transversely along said united zones.

6. Two sheets of paper united along a limited area in face to face contact by adhesive and having nesting crapings in said area.

7. The method of securing together paper elements comprising adhesvely securlng a limited` area thereof in face to face contact and craping as a unit the portions secured together.

8. An elastic sheath comprising side portions of craped paper united at least in part by adhesive seams, the crapings nesting at the seams. l

9. An elastic sheath comprising side portions of craped paper unitedh at least in part by adhesive seams, the crapings'nesting at the seams and extending substantially longitudinally thereof.

10. An elastic paper sheath in the form of a fiat tube having opposed sides joined at the edges by adhesive seams, the whole craped as a unit.

11. As an article of manufacture two webs of paper united in face to face contact at spaced intervals along limited areas, the whole craped as a unit, and providing a supply for dispensing elastic sheaths by sever- `ance of the webs along the united areas.

12. The article defined in claim 11 provided `with lines of weakening along the united areas to facilitate severance of the sheaths.

13. The method of forming elastic sheaths characterized by uniting two layers of paper in face to face contact along limited areas corresponding to at least a part of the contour of the sheath, craping the assembly,

`and cutting out the sheaths at least partly vby dividing the paper along a line within said areas to provide on a side of the division line a joint or seam for the margin of the article.

14. The method of preparing seamed elastic articles of paper characterized by first forming the seam in plain paper and then craping the paper including the area of said seam.

15. Two sheets of paper united along a i limited area in face to face contact and havof a fiat tube having opposed sides joined atthe edges by seamed together areas, the whole craped as a unit.

In testimony whereof, I have name to thisspeciication.

EDWARD H. ANGIER.

signed my

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2655080 *Sep 10, 1947Oct 13, 1953Arkell Safety Bag CoMethod of and machine for forming linings
US2697678 *Apr 7, 1952Dec 21, 1954Chicopee Mfg CorpFabric and method of producing same
US2705686 *May 7, 1952Apr 5, 1955Chicopee Mfg CorpLaterally extensible non-woven fabric
US2705687 *Apr 7, 1952Apr 5, 1955Chicopee Mfg CorpNonwoven fabric and method of producing same
US2705688 *Apr 7, 1952Apr 5, 1955Chicopee Mfg CorpNonwoven fabric and method of producing same
US2705692 *Apr 7, 1952Apr 5, 1955Chicopee Mfg CorpLaterally extensible polyoriented nonwoven fabric and method of producing same
US2763867 *Jan 22, 1951Sep 25, 1956Chagnon Yvette LDisposable bibs
US2782130 *May 7, 1952Feb 19, 1957Chicopee Mfg CorpNon-woven fabric
US2903390 *Oct 29, 1956Sep 8, 1959Seiichi KojimaMethod of making laminated furniture or part thereof
US3760940 *Jul 2, 1971Sep 25, 1973Mobil Oil CorpMethod of embossing thin, limp plastic film, and disposable and embossed plastic bag product
US3819033 *Oct 10, 1972Jun 25, 1974Itek CorpExpandable spectacle case
US4358865 *Oct 29, 1979Nov 16, 1982American Hospital Supply CorporationDisposable sheet system for patient stretcher
US5554145 *Feb 28, 1994Sep 10, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with multiple zone structural elastic-like film web extensible waist feature
US5650214 *May 31, 1996Jul 22, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb materials exhibiting elastic-like behavior and soft, cloth-like texture
US5691035 *Jun 25, 1996Nov 25, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb materials exhibiting elastic-like behavior
US5723087 *Aug 7, 1996Mar 3, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb materials exhibiting elastic-like behavior
US5749866 *Sep 27, 1996May 12, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with multiple zone structural elastic-like film web extensible waist feature
US5876391 *Oct 10, 1996Mar 2, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with structural elastic-like film web waist belt
US5891544 *Sep 30, 1997Apr 6, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb materials exhibiting elastic-like behavior
US5904673 *Dec 3, 1996May 18, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with structural elastic-like film web waist belt
US5916663 *Sep 30, 1997Jun 29, 1999Chappell; Charles W.Web materials exhibiting elastic-like behavior
US5947948 *Jun 19, 1996Sep 7, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with multiple zone structural elastic-like film web extensible leg flap panels
US5993432 *Sep 15, 1997Nov 30, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb materials having elastic-like and expansive zones
US6027483 *Apr 24, 1997Feb 22, 2000Chappell; Charles W.Web materials exhibiting elastic-like behavior
US6325787Jul 14, 1999Dec 4, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with multiple zone structural elastic-like film web extensible waist feature
US6706028Oct 24, 2001Mar 16, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with multiple zone structural elastic-like film web extensible waist feature
US7527615Jan 30, 2004May 5, 2009The Procter & Gamble CompanyStructural elastic-like nonwoven web
US8455077 *May 7, 2007Jun 4, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyFibrous structures comprising a region of auxiliary bonding and methods for making same
US20090321552 *Jun 26, 2008Dec 31, 2009Frank Stephen HadaMoldable paper product
WO1988000802A1 *Jul 30, 1987Feb 11, 1988Gene BlitzerDisposable article of bedding and method of making same
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/288, 156/183, 156/291, 156/253, 493/291, 493/297, 156/269, 5/487, 206/819, 428/152, 383/118, 156/209
International ClassificationB31B23/00
Cooperative ClassificationB31B19/62, B31D5/0069, B31B23/00, Y10S206/819, B31B2237/10, B31B2219/6007, B31B2237/50
European ClassificationB31B19/62, B31D5/00C5, B31B23/00