Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1508771 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 16, 1924
Filing dateMay 8, 1922
Priority dateMay 8, 1922
Publication numberUS 1508771 A, US 1508771A, US-A-1508771, US1508771 A, US1508771A
InventorsAlexander Boynton
Original AssigneeAlexander Boynton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bailer bottom
US 1508771 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. BOYNTON' BAILER BOTTOM Filed May 8, 1922 INVENTOR.

"wlfnesses ATTORNEYS,

Fatented Sept. 16, 1324.

BER

Application filed May 8,

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, ALEXANDER BOYNTON,

a citizen of the United States, and resident of San Antonio, in the county of Bexar and State of Texas, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Bailer Bottoms, of which the following is a specification.

. This invention relates to bailer bottoms especially adapted for use in oil and water wells.

Briefly stated an important object of this invention is to provide a bailer wherein the vertical pressure produced by downward 1 thrust of heavy bailer is utilized as a means to open the bailer for the reception of the mud and wherein the pressure of the mud surrounding the bailer results in the rapid filling of the same.

The invention aims to provide a bailer wherein the inlet and outlet openings are in the sides of the bailer so that when the bailer is withdrawn and set on the derrick sill, the free discharge of the mud will not be interfered with by inaccessible parts.

Also by havin the openings in opposite sides of the bai er a steam or water hose may be inserted in one of the openings for loosenin I the mud which may be lodged within t e bailer and the mud thus loosened is discharged out through the other opening. Likewise the steam from-the steam hose is not returned through the opening through which it enters, but is passed out throu h the oppositely arranged opening along with the mud.

A further object of the invention is to provide a. healer which will remain closed until the heavy mud in the bottom of the well is encountered and which will not open as a result of encountering the lighter mud which is located above the heavier mud. In this manner by removing the heavier mud first, the lighter mud and fluid above is left in the well to become mixed with the heavy mud below as the bailing process is continued, thus avoiding the necessity of washing and curing in water.

A furt er ob ect is to provide a well bailer which is of highl sim lified construction, reliable in use and in which the loss of any of the parts is prevented.

Other objects and advantages of the inm" ANDEE BO'YNTON, OF SAN ANTONIO, 1-

BOTTQM.

1922. Serial No. 559,362.

in description.

11 the accompanying drawing formin a part of this application and in which 1ke numerals are employed to designate like parts throughout the same,

Figure l is a side elevation of the improved bailer, v

Figure 2 is a. vertical sectional view through the same,

Figure 3 is a side elevation of a sleeve embodied in the invention.

Figure 4 1s a vertical section thru the sleeve illustrated in Figure 3.

In the drawing wherein for the purpose of illustration is shown a preferred embodiment of the invention the numeral designates an inner or mud receiving sleeve having its rear end formed with a coupling 31 adapted for connection with the lowering means. An outer sleeve 32 is slidable on the inner sleeve and is limited in its movement by means of a pair of oppositely arranged set screws 33 carried by the inner sleeve and arranged in longitudinaliy extending slots 34. The set screws 33 not only serve as a means for limiting the slid ing movement of the outer sleeve but also as a means for connecting a bushing. 35 to the inner sleeve. Further the set screws 33 of which there are two securely and sitively connect the threaded end of a lifter shaft 36 to the bushing 33 as the set screws positively engage the forward portion of the lifter shaft.

As illustrated in Figure 2 the forward portion of the lifter shaft 36 is formed with a head 37 which is received within a recess 38 in the forward portion of the cutter sleeve.

In carrying out the invention the outer sleeve is formedwith oppositely arranged grooves 39 which terminate at their rear ends in openin 40 adapted for registration with openings 41 in the forward portion of the inner sleeve. However the openings 40 of which there are two register with the openings 41 only when the outer sleeve 32 is forced rearwardly either through engagement with the heavy mud or by en agement with a tubular member exterior y of the well. That is to say when it is desired to discharge the mudfrom the bailer, the tapered forward end of the outer sleeve is introduced into the tubular member which will allow the inner sleeve and the lifter shaft 36 to advance, whereupon the openings 40 and 41 may be brought into registration. It is quite obvious that the engagement of the head 37 with a fiat surface such as the floor of the derrick would prevent the outer sleeve from retractin and aligning the openings 40 and 41. coiled sprin 42 is confined between the coupling mem r 31 and the rabbeted rear end of the outer sleeve and serves as a means for normally holding the parts in the position illustrated in Fig. 2.

In operation the bailer is introduced into the well and passed through the major portion of the lighter mud which of course is above the heavier mud. As the bailer de scends the mud in seeking an avenue of escape passes upwardly and thereby exerts a pressure which facilitates the introduction of the mud into the bailer. When slots 40 and 41 are caused to register the pressure of the heavy mud on the outer section causes the same to move rearwardly whereupon the openings 40 and 41 are brought into registration. As previously stated, the pressure created by the downward movement of the bailer operates to cause the :mud to rush violently into the bailer when the openings 40 and 41 are in registration. The weight of the lighter mud above added to weight of bailer forces the heavier mud into the bailer. This loading process can be made still more effective and certain by the repeated spudding of the bailer on bottom.

When the bailer is loaded with mud it may be withdrawn and quickly dumped by setting the tapered lower end of the outer sleeve on a pipe or other member having an opening and the weight of the inner section and the mud will cause the same to descend whereby the openings 40 and 41 are brought into registration. All of this can be accomplished without removing the bottom, tinkering with springs, pins or slots, and without fishing around in the slush pit to pick up the disconnected bottom, as is the case with other well lmown bailer bottoms.

In churning to dump, the slots are open at the instant of impact, thus allowing the mud to escape, being difl'erent in this respect also from the bailer bottoms now employed. In most of the bailers now in use, the mud is dischar ed through the lower end and consequent y the mud cannot be freely discharged at the instant of impact.

It will be further observed that a water or steam hose may be introduced into the bailer through one of the openings and the stiff mud ma be melted or discharged through the ot or opening thereby preventing the steam from coming back upon hands of operator through the opening'by which it entered.

In use the bottom section or outer sleeve cannot be lost because the lifter shaft 36 positively connects the outer sleeve to the inner sleeve and cooperates with the set screws 33 in this respect.

With reference to the foregoing description taken in connection with the accomanying drawings, it will be seen that a mud ailer constructed in accordance with this invention may be readily and conveniently operated for removing the mud from the bottom of an oil well or any other well. The connection between the parts precludes the possibility of loss of the outer section and consequently the necessity of frequently fishing in the bottom of the well for lost parts is overcome to alarge extent.

It is to be understood that the form of the invention herewith shown and described is to be taken as a preferred example of the same and that such minor changes in arrangement and construction of parts may be made as will remain within the spirit of the invention and the scope of what is claimed.

Having thus described the invention, what I claim is 1. A bailer for wells comprising inner and outer sleeves having mud passages adapted for registration, the outer sleeve havlng its forward portion tapered and provided with an end wall formed with a centrally arranged opening, a lifter shaft extended through the opening in the forward end wall of said outer sleeve, a bushing carried by the inner sleeve and engaged by said lifter shaft, set screws connecting said bushing to said inner sleeve and connecting the lifter shaft to the bushing, said set screws also providing a slidin connection between the inner and outer s eeves, and a spring urging said outer sleeve to its advanced po sition on said inner sleeve.

2. A bailer for wells comprising inner and outer sleeves having mud passages adapted for registration, the outer sleeve having its forward portion tapered and provided with an end wall formed with a centrally arranged opening, a lifter shaft extended through the opening in the forward end wall of said outer sleeve, a bushing carried by the inner sleeve and engaged by said lifter shaft, set screws connecting said bushing to said inner sleeve and connecting the lifter shaft to the bushing, said set screws also providing a sliding connection between the inner and outer sleeves, a spring urging said outer sleeve to its advanced position on said inner sleeve, and a'coupling threaded on the rear end of the inner sleeve and constituting an abutment for one end of said spring 3. bottom for well bailers comprising inner and outer sleeves, the inner sleeve being extended a substantial distance rearwardly of the outer sleeve, said inner and outer sleeves being provided with pairs of oppositely arranged openings adapted for t e passage of mud, a bushing threaded into the inner sleeve, set screws connecting said inner sleeve to said bushing, said outer sleeve being provided with slots receiving said set screws whereby a sliding connection is provided between the inner and outer sleeves, the forward ortion of said outer sleeve being formed wit grooves terminating at the openings in the outer sleeve, the forward portions of said grooves being flared.

4. A bailer for well bottoms comprising inner and outer sleeves, the inner sleeve bein extended a substantial distance rearwar y of the outer sleeve, said inner and outer sleeves being provided with pairs of oppositely arranged openings adapted for the passage 0t mud, a bushing threaded into the inner sleeve, set screws connecting said inner sleeve to said bushing, said outer sleeve being provided with slots receiving said set screws whereby a sliding connection is provided between the inner and outer sleeves, the forward portion of said outer sleeve being formed with grooves terminating at the openings in the outer sleeve, and a spring urging said outer sleeve to its advanced position.

5. A bailer comprisi an outer sleeve having its opposite sides ormed with 0 enings and with longitudinally exten ing grooves communicating with said 0 nings, aninner sleeve arranged Within said outer sleeve and having openings adapted for communication with said first named openings, and means blishing a slidin connection between the inner and outer s eeves.

6. A bailer comprising an outer sleeve having its opposite sides formed with 0 enings and with longitudinally exten ing grooves communicating with said openings, an inner sleeve arranged within said outer sleeve and having openings adapted for communication with said first named openings, means establishing a sliding connection between the inner and outer sleeves, and a lifter shaft having connection with the forward portion of said inner sleeve and formed with a head engaging the forward end of said outer sleeve whereby to maintain a constant connection between the inner and outer sleeves.

7. An apparatus of the character described comprisin inner and outer slidably connected sleeves1aving openings adapted for registration, the outer sleeve being formed with material conveying grooves communicating with the openings in the outer sleeve.

8. An apparatus of the character described comprising inner and outer slidably connected sleeves having openings adapted for registration, the outer sleeve being formed with material conveying grooves communicating with the openings in the outer sleeve, and a lifter shaft rigidly connected to one of said sleeves and having a stop element in the path of travel of the other sleeve.

9. An apparatus of the character described comprisin inner and outer slidably connected sleeves aving openings adapted for registration, the outer sleeve being formed with material conveying grooves communicating with the openings in the outer sleeve, a lifter shaft rigidly connected to one of said sleeves and having a stop element in the path of travel of the other sleeve, and means cooperating with said stop element to permit sliding movement of the sleeves with relation to each other.

10. An apparatus of the character described comprising inner and outer sleeves having mud passages adapted for registration, a bushing confined in one of the sleeves, a stop element threaded into said bushin and having means located in the path 0 travel of one of said sleeves to limit the sliding movement of the sleeves with relation to each other, and a set screw threaded through one of said sleeves, and said bushin and engagin said stop element where y to connect t he stop element to the bushing, said stop element being provided with a head and one of the "sleeves Iilrein provided with a slot receiving the ALEXANDER BOYNTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2508746 *Feb 19, 1946May 23, 1950Condra Elmo LSuction bailer
US5163515 *Apr 23, 1991Nov 17, 1992Den Norske Stats Oljeselskap A.SPumpdown toolstring operations in horizontal or high-deviation oil or gas wells
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/169
International ClassificationE21B27/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B27/00
European ClassificationE21B27/00