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Publication numberUS1509133 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1924
Filing dateFeb 1, 1922
Priority dateFeb 1, 1922
Publication numberUS 1509133 A, US 1509133A, US-A-1509133, US1509133 A, US1509133A
InventorsJonathan R Freeze
Original AssigneeRudd Hardesty
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Riveting machine
US 1509133 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. R. FREEZE RIVETING MACHINE 9 Sheets-511w t.

File Feb. 1

I N VEN TOR. J 6 @5525.

TORNE Y.

Sept. 23 1924.

J. R. FREEZE RIVETING MACHINE Filed Feb. 1, 1922 9 Sheets-Sheet 2 I NVEN TOR. Jff/ZEEZL W B /Mai WA? Sept. 23 1924.

J. R. FREEZE RIVETING MACHINE 9 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. J/f/ZPQEZE.

Filed Feb. 1, 1922 Sept. 23, I924.

J. R. FREEZE RIVETING MACHINE Sept. 23 1924.

J. R. FREEZE RIYETING MACHINE Filed Feb. 1, 1922 9 Sheets-Sheet 5 Sept. 23 1924.

J. R. FREEZE RIVETING MACHINE Filed Feb. 1, 1922 9 Sheets-Sheet 6 l N V EN TOR. Jfifiszza 3 1924. R. EEZE VETING MACHINE n d F 192' INVENTOR, J T'EEZE.

Sept. 23 1924;

J. R. FREEZE RIVETING MACHINE Filed Feb. 1 1922 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 INVE J fi ksszs.

ATTORNEY.

' eting toge Patented Sept. 23, 1924.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

JONATHAN R. FREEZE, F NIIDDLETOWN, OHIO, ASSIGNOR TO RUDD HARDESTY, TRUSTEE, DENVER, COLORADO.

RIVETING MACHINE.

Application filed February 1, 1922. Serial No. 533,356.

To all'wfwm it may concern; Y

Be it known that I, JONATHAN R.FREEZE, a citizen of the UnitedState-s, residing at Middletown, in the county of Butler and State of Ohio, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Riveting Machines, of which thefollowing is a specification.-

My invention relates to riveting machines and more particularlyto machines for 'rivt ier the lapping edge portions of metalpipes of the kind used in drainage and irrigation systems.

It is an object of my invention to provide a power-driven mechanism of simpleand practical construction which by a series of periodically recurring movements in a cyclic operation, automatically fastens the lapping portions of a pipe-section together by one or more rows of equidistantly spaced rivets.

Another object of my invention is to provide in a machine of the above'described character, a contrivance of novel construction which in the operation of the machine, feeds rivets obtained from a suitable magazine, singly and at regular intervals to holes in the parts to be fastened together.

A further object of the invention is to provide a convenient and eflici'e'nt means to automatically advance the work at regular predetermined intervals whereby to space the rivets at equal distances along the length thereof, and still other objects reside in details of construction and novel arrangements of co-operating elements, all of which will fully appear in the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which an embodi seams of metal pipe sections, its construc- It should be further understood that while I have shown and described the cooperatively associated elements of the machine in the simplest and most practical form at present known to me, variations in their arrangement and individual construe- Figure 2, an end view of the machine looking in the direction of the arrow C,

Figure 1 and drawn to an enlarged scale; Figure 3, an enlarged section on the line 3-3, Figure 1 Figure 4, a sectiontahen on the line 44, Figure 3;

Figure 5, a plan view of the head end of the mandrel of the machine, lookingin the direction of the arrow placed across the line 5+-5 in Figure 1 and drawn to a relatively larger scale 5 r Figure 6, a longitudinal section along the line 66, Figure 5;

Figure 7, an enlarged fragmentarysection on-the line 7f7, Figure 5;

Figure 8, a transverse section on the line 8-8, Figure 5;

Figure 9, a similar section taken on the line 9-9, Figureo; Figure 10, a section on the line 10 -10, Figure 5;

Figure 11, a section similar to that of- Figure 7 showing the jaws at the end of the rivet feed'tube in the position they assume for the passage of the rivet to a hole of the work;

Figure 12, an enlarged sectional elevation of the rivet feed mechanism at the feed end of the machine;

Figure 13, an enlarged section on the' line 1313, Figure 1 corresponding with the line 1313 in Figure 12;

Figure 14, a section taken on the line 14-14, Figure 12;

Figure 15, a section on the line 1515, Figure 12; v

Figure 16, a fragmentary side view of one of the stripping blades at the entrance to the rivet chute of the feed mechanism, looking in the direction of the arrowD,'

Figure 13;

Figure 17, an enlarged sectional elevation of the timing element of the, feed mechanism taken on the line 1717, Figure 12;

Figure 18, a section on the line l818, Figure 17;

Figure 19, a section taken on the line 19-19, Figure 17;

Figure 20, a section on the line 20-20, Figure 17 Figure 21, a section on the line EMF-21, Figure 18;

Figure 22, a sectional view of the lower portion of the riveting and punching tool taken on the line 22 2 Figure 3, drawn to an enlarged scale;

Figure 23, a section on theline 2323, F gure 2; v v

Figure 24, a side elevation of the cutoff valve of the feed mechanism ;-V

; Figure 25, an end-view of thesame looking gin the direction of the arrow E, Figure 24;

Figure 2G, a perspective view of an end portionof a pipe riveted by the operation of the machine;

; Figure 27, a sectionalelevation of the feed end'of the machine, showing a mechanical means for feeding the rivets to the riveting head at the end of the mandrel, this being a modification of the air-feed shown in the other views;

Figure 28, a cross-section on the line 28-28., Figure 27;

,IT-igure 29, a similar section taken on the line 2929, Figure 27 and Figure. 30, an enlarged sectional elevation of the valve which automatically controls the sup-ply of air in the operation of the machine, and the mechanism which operates the valve.

Referring more specifically to the drawings, the reference character 2 designates the base frame of the machine, which in the con struction shown consists-of two or more of interconnected I beams.

The machine comprises three distinctive mechanisms with their respective supports -and actuating devices, and the connections required for their systematic, operation at determinate periods ina cyclic movement.

The mechanisms referred to are, first: a punchin and riveting mechanism which at the he end of the machine, punches holes 'pe, automatically projects oles in each cyclic operation ment of the rivets into the of the machine.

Before proceeding With a detailed description of the co-operating mechanisms of the machine, attention is called to the fact that the construction shown in the drawings is designed for connecting the lapping portions of the pipe by two rows of rivets arranged in staggered relation to each other as illustrated in Figure 26 of the drawings.

This method of riveting the pipes obviously requires duplex means for pu-nch ing the holes, feeding the rivets thereto and clinching the ends of the rivets, and inasmuch as in the present construction, said means are exact duplicates and are inde' pendent of each other except for their synchronous actuation by one and the same operating mechanism, the description of one of saidme'ans in each mechanism will suflice to convey a clear and complete understanding of the construction and operation of the entire machine.

The riveting and punching mec-lmnisni and the feed mechanism are mounted upon the base frame of the machine at opposite ends of a horizontally disposed mandrel which functions as a support for the pipe section and which contains the conduit or conduits through which the rivets, periodically supplied by the feed-mechanism, pass to the holes formed in the pipe by the operation of the punching tool.

The mandrel, designated in the drawings by the reference character 3, is supported upon standards 4' erected on the base frame at the feed end of the machine and upon a vertically adjustable chair or rest 5 at the head-end of the same.

The riveting and punching mechanism is mounted upon a standard 6 erected on the base frame at the head end of the machine and includ-in a laterally projecting basal portion for tie support of the before mentioned adjustable rest, and an overhanging arm on which the punching and riveting head of the mechanism is mounted for vertical reciprocation The feed mechanism is, in its entirety, mounted upon a rearwardly projecting frame 7. which is rigidly fastened at the u per ends of the before mentioned standar s at the rear end of the base frame 2.

Removably mounted at the free end of the mandrel between the overhanging arm of the standard 6 and the chair 5, is a head 8 which as best shown in Figures 5 and 6, supports the pipe section to be operated upon by the riveting and punching tools.

To clearly illustrate the operations of the different mechanisms embodied in the machine, upon the lapping portions of the metal pipe, the latter has been shown in its relative position in several of the views and 'has in each instance been designated by the reference letter W.

The head 8 consists of a block 9 provided with a circular shank 10 for its insertion in the end of the hollow mandrel, and a shell 12 in which the block is fitted. The shell has a tapering end portion which facilitates the placement of the pipe upon the mandrel and which is preferably provided with openings for the a plication of a tool to facilitate the with rawal of the head from the mandrel. A bolt 13 fastens the block and its shell against relative displacement.

The shell has at its sides, parallel flanges 14 which are apertured for the sliding support of pairs of rods 15 upon which are mounted the forming and sizing rollers 16. The upper and lower faces of the shell are concentrically circular to fit within the pipe section and the rollers are relatively posi-' tioned to engage the inner surface of the pipeat the sides thereof and thereby co operate with said faces in holding the pipe in true cylindrical form while its lapping edges arebeing riveted together.

The purpose of slidably supporting the rods with which the rollers are connected is to permit of a forward movement of the latter when the carriage to which the pipe section is connected, reaches the end of its forward travel, and thereby allow of the application of rivets at the extreme end of the pipe, as will hereinafter be more fully described.

The block of the head has in its upper surface, a series of recesses which are adapted to hold anvils 17 for the support of the rivets while their ends are being upset, to provide passages 18 for the slugs punched out of the metal by the action of the punch ing tools, and to contain the rivet guiding and placing members at the ends of the feed conduits, which in the operation of the machine, function to direct the rivets into the holes of the pipe. a

The' anvils 17 consists of cylindrical blocks which are fitted in the correspondingly shaped recesses of the mandrel head adjacent the forward end thereof, the recesses 18 at the opposite end of the head constitute wells which receive the slugs punched out of the metal in forming the rivet holes, and are continued into slanting passages 19 that open as at 19 in the sides of the shell 12 for the discharge of the slugs outside the head, and the recesses which hold the rivet guiding and placing members of the feed mechanism, are formed intermediate of the other recesses at the ends of partially curved channels 20 which are continued to the end of the shank 10 of the head, and connect with conduits 21 which extend longitudinally through the hollow mandrel, to the timing element of the feed mechanism at the rearward end thereof, as will hereinafter be more fully described.

The rivet guiding members hereinbefore referred to, each consist, as best shown in Figures 7 and 11 of the drawings, of a pair of jaws preferably pivotally mounted upon a support 23 which is fastened in the respective recess of the mandrel head by means of machine bolts 24. The jaws 25 meet centrally above the channel 20, and they are interiorly tapered to spread apart as shown in Figure 11, by the impact of a rivet forcibly projected through the channel in the operation of the feed mechanism. Coiled springs 27 placed in recesses of the support 23 beneath tail pieces at the lower ends of the jaws, serve to yielding hold said member-sin their normal position shown in Figure 7.

The jaws function in the operation to direct the rivets into the holes of the lapping portions of a pipe supported on the mandrel, and after the rivets, which in the drawings have been designated by the letter R, have passed beyond the jaws and the latter have reassumed their normal position, they are supported on the heads thereof until the pipe in which they are inserted, is advanced to the position in which the rivets rest upon the anvils, as will hereinafter be described.

The punching and riveting mechanism of the machine comprises a plunger head 28 which is fitted for vertical reciprocation in a slideway of the overhanging arm of the standard 6. The head, as shown in Figures 5, 22 and 23, is hollow and it carries at its lower end a stock 29 which holds the riveting hammers 30 and the punches 31 of the mechanism.

The stock has a flange which rests upon a should-er at the lower end of the plungerhead and it is secured by means of a gag 32 and a wedge key 33, the latter of which is tightened by nuts 34 on a threaded stud 35 which extends from a side of the head 28 through an opening in its end.

The tools 30 and 31 are of cylindrical form and have at the ends of their shanks beveled beads by means of which they are suspended in correspondingly formed openings of an assembling plate 36 which is fastened at the lower end of the tool stock by a flange nut- 37. The plate is held against rotation by a tenon, which is fitted in a correspondingly formed groove in the adjoining surface of the stock.

It will be apparent that the above described method of fastening the tools to the reciprocating head permits of their ready removal and replacement in case of wear or breakage.

The head 28 is ieciprocated in the operation of the machine, through the instrumentality of an eccentric 38 on a shaft 42 which extends transversely to the direction of its reciprocating movement. The eccentric is disposed inside the hollow head and gives motion to a loosely surrounding ring 39, the downwardly extending stem 40 of which, terminates in a spherical knob 41. The eccentric ring engages with a bearing block 43 at the upper end of the head in which it has its movement, and the knob. at the end of its stem bears in a correspondingly formed depression of a wear block 44 at the lower end of the head.

The rotary movement of the shaft is through the medium of the eccentric converted into a linear reciprocating movement of the, head which causes the tools at the lower end thereof, to intermittently engage with the pipe section supported on the mandrel, it being understood that the hammers and'the punches of thehend are alined respectively with the anvils 17 and the wells 18 of the head at the end of the mandrel.

A wedge 45 in the slideway is longitudinally adjustable to take up wear and thereby preventlateral motion of the head during its reciprocating movement.

The shaft 42 whiclris supported in bearings on the standard 6, is held against longitudinal displacement by collars 46 at its end protruding forward of the arm in which the plunger head has its movement, and a gear wheel 47 loosely mounted on the shaft, meshes with a pinion 48 on a drive shaft 49 which is mounted on brackets of the standard 6 and carries a fly wheel 50.

A clutch member 5i slidably mounted on the shaft 42 is adapted to secure the rotative continuity of the gear wheel 47 with the shaft and its positions are controlled through the medium of a hand lever 52 which is fulcrumed on the standard 6 as at 53.

A link 54 connects the lever with a bell crank which through the medium of a coiled spring on a connecting rod 56, gives motion to a second bell crank 57. A push rod 58 co-operates with a cam face on the sliding clutch member, to separate it from the gear wheel and a forked bell crank 57 is connected in a circumferential groove of the member to move it in the opposite direction. The push rod has a lever connection with the before mentioned rod 56, to be moved to and from its operative position through the medium of the bell crank 55 and the therewith connected lever 52 which extends forward of the overhanging arm of the standard to be within easy reach of an operator standing at the head end of the machine.

A springpressed friction brake 59 engaging with said collar at the end of the shaft 42 insures immediate discontinuation of the rotary movement of the shaft when the clutch member is disengaged from the gear wheel 47.

The pipe section W which, as stated hereinbefore, is in the operation of the machine,

intermittently advanced to space the rivets by which its lapping edges are connected, is to this end fastened to a carriage which is mounted to move lengthwise of the mandrel upon two rails 65 arranged at opposite sides thereof. The carriage which, in the drawings, is designated by the reference numeral 60, is composed of a body 61 and two laterally projecting wings 62 which fit inside the end of the pipe section and extend partially beyond the same. Eccentric clamps 63 on the outer portions of the wings, forcibly engage with the outer surface of the pipe to secure it to the carriage.

The pipe section thus fastened fits snugly around the upper and lower bearing surfaces of the head at the end of the mandrel and it"is interio-rly engaged by the sizing rolls 16 which co-operate with said surfaces to maintain the pipe in true cylindrical form. The pipe at the point at which it engages the head, is supported upon the before mentioned chain, or rest 5 whichconsists of a hollowed scat swivelled at the upper end of a screw 67 which extends into a correspondingly threaded opening in the basal portion of the standard 6.

The rails 65 upon which the sliding carriage is supported are mounted on benches 66 which are fastened to the base frame of the machine and extend transversely beneath the mandrel of the same. Guide ways at opposite sides of the benches serve to slidably support a pair of ratchet bars 68 which in the operation of the machine, function to intermittently advance the carriage and the therewith connected pipe sections a distance equal to the spaces of their teeth.

The equidistantly spaced teeth of the ratchet bars are to this end engaged by gravity pawls 69 mounted at opposite sides of the carriage in engagement with hand levers 70 which provide a convenient means to disengage the pawls from the ratchet bars for the relative adjustment of the carriage.

In the operation of the machine, the ratchet bars are intermittently advanced a distance equal to the spaces of their teeth by an eccentric on the shaft 42, the ring of which has an upwardly extending arm 71.

A lever 72 fulcrumed as at 73 on top of the standard 6, is at one of its ends connected to the eccentric arm and its opposite end is through the medium of a rod 74, connected with a crank-arm 75 on a rocker shaft 77, which is mounted in bearings 76 on the base frame of the machine. Arms 78 at the ends of the shaft, which extend upwardly and at right angles to the arm 75, are connected with the two ratchet bars 68 by means of links 79.

The extreme rearward position of the carriage to which it is adjusted at the beginning of the operation, is determined by an ad justable stop-collar 80 on the mandrel 3 and its said rearward adjustment is effected throughthe medium of a winding drum 81 with'which it is connected by means of a cable 82. The drum 81 is mounted on a shaft 83 which is supported in hearings on the base frame of the machine and which, by means of a pulley S1. is connected with the same line shaft or other source of power, which imparts motion to the drive shaft 49 of the riveting mechanism and to the moving members of the feed mechanism hereinafter to be described. I i

' A sliding clutch 85 engages the pulley to secure orbreak its rotative continuity with the shaft and a hand lever 86 fulcrumed as at 8?, is connected with the clutch to more it to and from its operative position. The cable is at: its ends, attached to the carriage and to the drum upon whichit winds, and it is trained around a sheave 88 which is mounted on brackets 89 on one of the-standards4": which support the man drel at the rear end of the structure.

The feed "mechanism of the machine. whichas stated hereinbetorc. is assembled upon a fiamc T projecting rearwardly from the standards 4-, comprises a stationary hopper 90 which-by means of a partition 91, is divided into two compartments 1 which separately provide the rivets required forthe two rows by which the lapping edges of the pipes are fastened together.

The hopper is mounted upon a, support 92 which is chambered to house the parts by which the rivets contained in the compartments of the hopper are conducted to the timing element of the mechanism.

The parts above referred to comprise a reciprocating blade 93 which in the duplex construction shown in the drawings, is branched to extend at opposite sides of the partition 91, and which in its lower portion, has a transverse groove 94 for its operative connection with a crank 95 at the end of a shaft 96 mountediin a bearing on the support 92. A gear wheel 97 on the shaft meshes with a pinion 98 on a drive shaft '99 which by means of a belt- 100, is connected with the line shaft or other source of energy.

The two members of the blade have at their upper edges longitudinal grooves adapted to receive the shanks of the rivets, and their said edges slant so as to bring their grooves in alinement with corresponding grooves or slideways in a rivet chute 101 when the blade is at the end of the upward stroke of its reciprocating motion. The chute 101 is fastened to the support of the hopper and its slidewavs connect at their lower ends with the timing element of the feed mechanism which causes the rivets to more singly and at regular intervals to the feed conduits 21, which connect with the channels of the mandrel head as hereinbefore described.

At the upper edgeof the partition 91 of the hopper, are hinged blades 102 which are normally held in a position in which they slant over the grooved edges of the rivet-carrier 93 by means of springs 103 as shown in Figure 16 of the drawing. The yielding blades serve in the operation of the machine, to remove rivets other than those extending in the grooves of the carrier, which were carried upwardly from the mass contained int'he hopper, and thereby pre= vent of their being spilled onto the slideways of the chute and of their possible interference with the operation of the timing element. i v i The timing element shown in detail .in Figures 17 to 22 inclusive, of thedrawings, comprises a shaft 106-which is rotatably supported in bearingslO-t-at the end of the rivet chute andon a standard 107 of the frame 7. The: shaftds, inithe "operation of the machine, intermittently oscillated through the instriunentality of toggle arms 108 and 109, which, by means of a rod 110, are conuected'wit'li a slottedcrank 112 on a shaft 113 rotatably mounted in hearings on the frame. A pinion. 114.- on the shaft 113 meshes with a.- sliding rack 115 and this rack is by means ofa link 116 connected to move in conjunction with one 10f the ratchet bars68.1 I .1

At the lower end of-the rivet chute are chambers 117.,into which the rilvets passing through its slideways, areidischarged singly and at regular intervals through the instrumentality of the timing element. Short conduits 118 connect. the chambers; 117\ with curved passages 105 in a block 119 which is fastened upon thenframe 7 and which, in conjunction with the piece in which the conduits are; formed, provides a;:support for the end of the chute. I

The passages 105' connect, as shown in Figure 12,.vith the ends of the conduits 21. extending through the hollow mandrel and they have branches 120 extending rearwardly through the block 119 for their connection with pipes 121 leading from a conveniently located source of air under pressure. The passage of the rivets from the chambers 11? to the pipe 21 is automatically controlled by a rotary valve 122 :when in the movement of the toggle, the rivets are fed from the chute to the transfer member of the timing element the valve 122 is closed to prevent the compressed air supplied to the ducts 105 from interferin with the op eration. The movement of the valve is effected through the medium of a cam 124 fixed on the. rotary toggle shaft and engaging with an arm 123 on the valve. A sprin best. shown in nigures 21 and 25, connected with the arm holds it in constant engagement with a pin at the end of the cam.

Rotatahly mounted on the shaft 106 are the two members 125 and 126 of the timing element which co-operate to feed the rivets passing through the chute, into the chamber 117 communicating with the conduits 21 in the mandrel. The two members are mounted one within the other and they have oppositely extending sleeves inside the bearings 101 .in which the element is supported. The sleeves have at their ends segmental slots 1-33 and 134, best shown in Figures 18 and 20 of the drawings, and the shaft has radially projecting studs 135 and 136, which extend in the respective slots to engage with shoulders at the ends thereof.

In the normal position of the members, the stud 135 is engaged by :the shoulder of the slot in the inner member 125, rearward thereof with :relation to the forward direction of rotation of the shaft 106 as indicated by the arrows in Figures 17 18 and 20, and the stud 136 engages with the shoulder of the slot in the mner member which is forward thereof with respect to the same movement of the shaft.

; ()ppo-sitely wound torsion springs 127 and 128 coiled around the shaft are at their ends connected with the sleeves of the members 125 and 126 and with collars 129 and 130 which are fixed on the shaft at opposite sides of the bearings 104.

The inner cylindrical member 125 of the timer has pockets 131 which normally connect with the slideways of the chute and which, in the operation of the device, function to carry the rivets singly to the orifices of the chambers 117 through which they pass into the passages 1-05 of the block 119.

The outer member 126 of the timer, consists .of a segmental shell which fits around the inner member, and a sharp-edged blade 12-52 which in the operation of the timer, moves across the ends of the slideways of the chute to separate the rivets which had passed into the pockets of the inner member, from the others and to hold the rivets in the slideways against downward motion while the inner member carries its lead to the point of discharge.

In the operation of the timer, the shaft 106 turned in the direction of the arrows through the medium of the toggle movement, causes the spring 127 to unwind while the spring 128, which is coiled in the opposite direction, is tensioned and thereby transmits the movement of the shaft to the cutoff member 126.

The member rotates with the shaft until the end of its blade 132 engages with a shoulder on the rivetchute in which position it separates the rivets which previously had entered the pockets of the transfer member 125 from those in the slideways.

After the member 126 has thus completed its operative movement, the stud 135 on the shaft contacts with the shoulder in the slot of the inner member, opposite to that it normally engages, the stud having passed idly through said slot while the outer member had its operative movement.

The engagement of the stud with the shoulder of the slot causes the transfer memher 125 to follow the movement of the shaft, until after it has discharged the rivets .carried in its pockets into the chambers 117, when the movement of the shaft is reversed and the springs return the members to their original position.

it will be observed that during the continued rotation of the shaft after the member 126 has reached the end of its operative movement, the stud 136 moves idly through the slot 134 and re-engages the shoulder thereof during the opposite .movement of the shaft to return the member to its original position.

The pipe 121 which connects the conduits 21 in the mandrel with a source of air under pressure, passes over the machine in close proximity to the overhanging arm of the standard 6 where it is within easy reach of the operator.

A valve 137, which normally closes the pipe, is adapted to be opened by the upward movement of its downwardly extending stein which is engaged by a push bar 138 slidably mounted on the housing 28 of the plunger head 29. The lower end of the push bar extends in the path of a cam 139 on the shaft 42, which is arran ed to lift the same and thereby open the va ve at the time that the riveting head, after having engaged with the work on the mandrel, moves upwardly in its reciprocating motion.

A bell crank lever 140, disposed to contact with the valve stem, independent of the push bar, is engaged by the end of a pull rod 141 when it is desired to open the valve by hand, as may be required to dislodge a rivet sticking in one of the passages or conduits through which the rivets move, 01' to supply a rivet to the work in case the timing element has accidentally failed to deliver the rivets at the regular period in the cyclic operation.

Another valve 142 in the pipe 121, at the head end of the machine, is provided to shut off the supply of air when the machine is not in operation. The valve is operated by hand and its lever is by means of a chain or cord 143 connected with a spring-pressed brakeshoe 144 which is pivotally mounted at the lower end of the rivet chute of the feed mechanism The shoe normally engages with the heads of the lowermost rivets in the slideways to hold them against downward movement and thereby interrupt the supply of rivets to the timing element in case it is desired to discontinue the feeding action while the machine is in operation. When the valve 142 is in its closed position, the shoe engages the rivets in the chute and by its weight holds them against downward motion while if the valve is subsequently opened, the pull on the rope or cable 143 by rotation of the valve, raises the shoe and permits the rivets to more downwardly to the timer at the same time that the air is supplied to move the rivets to the forward end of the machine as hereinbefo-re described.

The fcedJnechanism illustrated in Figures 27 to .29 inclusive, differs from that hereinabove described, in that it. operates without the aid of fluid pressure.

The rivets supplied through the medium of a timing mechanism as in the first described construction, fill the conduits 21 and the passages connected therewith, in a continuous series extending from the point at which they enter to that at which they are insertedqin the holes of the pipe on the mandrel;

Pressure :exerted upon any one rivet of the'series at the feed end of the machine is transmitted through the others to the rivet at the forward end of the feed line, which consequently is pushed past the guiding members25 into the holes of the pipe section. i

The distance between the feed and riveti'ng'mechanisms of the machine, at opposite ends of the mandrel, makes it imperative that the series of rivets be impelled at as many intermediate points as may be neces sary to prevent of their line being buckled in the conduits.

With this end in view, the feed mechanism includes a number of co-operatively associated propelling members which are arranged at regular intervals inside the mandrel and which operate in conjunction with the timing element, to intermittently engage with the rivets in the conduits 21 and forcibly move them a distance substantially equal to the length of one of them.

The conduits 2]. are made in sections connected by interdisposed blocks 148 which provide a support for the propelling means abovereferred to. The blocks are bored to provide a continuous passage for the rivets in conjunction with the sections of the conduits between which they are disposed and their upper surfaces are recessed to admit the co-operating parts of the mechanism arranged in the upper portion of the mandrel.

Slides 146 supported in the rectangular recess of each block, contiguous to the sides thereof, are engaged by spring blades 158 which frictionally restrain their independent movement.

Bell cranks 157 are fulcrumed to and between the slides of each of the several supports disposed in the mandrel, and they conjointly support two bars 147 and 151 which are p-ivotally connected at the ends of their arms.

The bar 151 which is disposed above the other, is separated therefrom by interposed distance pieces 152 made of rubber or other suitable material and it has at its end, projccting beyond the rear end of the mandrel, a rack which meshes with a pinion 154 on a shaft 155 of the toggle movement of the timer.

The bar 147 carries a number of push heads 146 which extend into longitudinal slots 145 of the conduit 21. The heads which straddle the bar, fit in grooves in the opposite sides thereof and their lower ends are bifurcated as shown in l igure 29, to permit of their straddling the shanks of the rivets in the conduit when by downward movement of the bar 147, they are constrained to enter the conduit through the slots thereof. The heads 146 are held in place on the bar 147 by springs 150 which permit of their yielding displacement in the event of their coming in contact with the edges of the rivet heads as may accidentally occur.

In the operation of the mechanism, the bar 151 is intermittently reciprocated in synchronous operation with the timing element of the automatic feed. The longitudinal movement of the bar is by rotation of the bell cranksabout their fulcrums on the slides 156. converted into a downward movement of the bar 147 with the result that the heads 146 are entered between adioining rivets in the conduit 21, it being understood that the slides are restrained from following the movement of the rack bar by the spring blades 158. Then, however, the bar 147 is held against further downward motion by its contact with the conduit 21, the continued longitudinal movement of the rack bar causes the slides to move in conjunction therewith, thereby imparting a longitudinal movement to the bar 147 and to the rivets with which its heads engage.

The entire line of rivets is thus fed a distance equal to the length of one of them with the result that the rivet at the forward end of the line is forcibly inserted into the holes in the lapping portions of the pipe on the mandrel, while another rivet is added to the line at the feed end of the machine by the simultaneous action of the timing element.

Having thus described the construction of the rivetinq machine in its preferred and modified forms. the cyclic operation of its interrelated elements and mechanisms will be readily understood. The operator standing at the head-end of the machine fastens the end of a pipe-section to be riveted, to the carriage 60 bv means of the clamps 63 and after havine' lifted the pawls 69 to their inoperative position through the medium of the levers 70, causes the carriage to move rearwardly along its rails into engagement with the previously adjusted stop 80, by rotation of the winding drum 21. hen the carriage is in this position, the free end of the pipe section rests, with its lapping edges upper-most, upon the head oi the mandrel, and the latter is supported upon the vertically' adjustable chair 5.

With the parts thus positioned, the operator first actuates the reciprocating punching and riveting head by movement of the controlling lever 52, in order to producethe first; pair of holes in the lapping portions of the pipe at the extreme end thereof. He subsequently opens the air line by adjustment of the valve 142 and at the same time releasesthe rows of rivets in the chute of the feed mechanism which were held against downward movement by the frictional enga 'ement of the shoe 144.

fJm-ing the subsequent upward movement of the punching and riveting head, the reciprocating: ratchet-bars 68 cause the carriage and the therewith connected pipe section, to move forwardly a distance equal to the spaces between its teeth, and the rack 115 engaging with the pinion 114, operates the timing element as hereinbefore de scribed, with the result that two rivets are separately fed into the chambers 117. During the last mentioned operation, the valve 122 is opened by the action of the cam 24 on the rotary toggle shaft, upon its stem 123 and the rivets pass from the chambers into the curved channels 105 communicating with the conduits 21. After the valve 122 has subsequently been returned to its closed position, the cam 139 on the rotating shaft 42 opens the valve 137 which admits the pressure fluid supplied to the pipe 121 to the channels. The fluid forcibly projects the rivets through the conduits 21 and past the spreading jaws 25, into the holes previously punched in the lapping ends of the pipe section, which by the forward movement of the carriage were brought in register with the delivery ends of the channels 20.

The jaws 25 direct the rivet. to move straight into the alined holes of the pipe, and when closed together by their springs after the rivet head has passed their upper ends, they provide conjointly a support upon w iich the rivet rests until, by the next forward movement of the carriage, the pipe section is again advanced.

After the rivets are placed, the automatic valves in the air line are returned to their closed position, and the punching; tools on the descending head. produce a second pair of holes in the pipe section. During the subsequent upward movement of the reciprocating head. the pipe section is again advanced and a pair of rivets is inserted in the last two holes as before, and the rivets which were placed in the holes by the first operation. are now positioned on the anvils 17 of the mandrel head and beneath the riveting: hammers ot' the reciprocating plunger head which. in the following downward movement oi the head, upset the ends thereof.

In the continued operation of the machine, one pair of rivets is clinched, and a pair of holes is punched by each downward movement of the reciprocating head, and the pipe is advanced and a pair of rivets is insorted into the holes produced in the preceding action, during each upward movement. of the head, and the lapping portions of the pipe section are thus rive-ted together along the entire length thereof.

When the carriage to which the pipe is attached. approaches the head at the forward end 0 f the mandrel, it pushes the sizing rolls 16 out of its way by engagement with the sliding rods 15 on which they are mounted and thereby permits of the appli cation of rivets at the very end of the pipe at which it is attached to the carriage by the. clamps 63.

It will be understood that the mandrel head and the sizing rolls co-operate to hold the pipe in true cylindrical form during the riveting: operation and that in order to adapt the machines for riveting a pipe of different, diameter, it is necessary that the head at the end of the mandrel be replaced by one of corresponding size.

The machines may be operated under constant control of the operator by reversing the clutch lever 52 each time a; pair of rivets has been stuck in the holes of the pipe, or the operation of the machine may be rendered automatic by fastening the lever in its adjusted position in which the movable clutch member engages its correlative on the gear wheel 47.

In the automatic operation, the pipe is advanced and rivets are fed into the holes thereof alternately With the operative movements of the reciprocating punching and riveting head and the actions are continued in cyclic alternation until the entire pipe has been riveted.

hen the operator desires to discontinue the operation. he interrupts the rivet-feed by closing the valve 142, which causes the supply of fluid pressure to be discontinued and whose movement is at the same time instrumental in arrestingthe passage of the rivets to the timing element, through the medium of the pressure-shoe 144.

If, as may accidentally occur, a rivet. becomes lodged in the feed line or the feeding action is otherwise interrupted, a blast of air supplied by manually opening the valve 137 is, in most instances, suiiicient to restore the regular order of successive operations,

'closes the connections between the chambers of the timing element and the conduits 21 during the intervals between the feeding actions, prevents air from entering the chamhers when the valve 137 is opened.

Having thus described my invention, what I desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a riveting machine, a work-support, a riveting and punching element, an element adapted to feed rivets to holes of work on the support, an element for supplying rivets to the feed element, both the feed element and the supply element being controlled by movement of the first mentioned element, and a spacing element adapted to advance the work alternately with the operations of the other elements.

2. In a riveting machine, a Work-support having a passage for rivets to holes in the work, and a pair of pivoted, inwardly taper ing rigid jaws'at the end of the passage adapted to co-operatively direct into a hole of the work, arivet passing between them.

3. In a riveting machine, a work-support having a passage for rivets to holes in the work, and a pair of spring-pressed, pivoted jaws at the end of the passage, separable by the passage of a rivet between them and conjointly providing a support for a rivet in a hole of the work, when closed together.

4. In a riveting machine, a tool stock, an assembly plate immovably clamped against an end thereof, and having counter sunk openings, and headed tools in said 0 nings, engaging with said end of the stock.

5. In a pipe riveting machine, a work-support comprising a mandrel having a head provided with concentric bearing surfaces, and rollers on the head co-operating with said surfaces to size a pipe supported on the mandrel, by contact with the lnner sur face of the pipe.

6. In a pipe riveting machine, a riveting tool, a work-support comprising a mandrel having a head adapted to support a ipe for the operation of the riveting tool, a carriage with means thereon to fasten a pipe, mechanism for propelling the carriage,'and sizing rollers movable on the head to ad vance with the carriage at the termination of its operative movement, whereby to permit of its bringin the end of a pipe at which it is fastene to the carriage, in line with the riveting tool.

7. In a pipe riveting machine, a pipe supporting mandrel, a carriage having a member to enter a pipe supported on the mandrel, and clamps on the carrier engaging exteriorly of the pipe and co-operating with the member to fasten the pipe to the carriage.

8. In a riveting machine, a normally stationary mandrel, a carriage adapted to advance the work on the mandrel and having means for its attachment to a pipe around the mandrel, propelling mechanism for the carriage, an adjustable stop on the mandrel to limit the return movement of the carriage, and mechanism to move the carriage to engagement with the stop.

9. In a riveting machine, a work-support, a carriage to advance the work on the support, propelling mechanism for the carria e, and power-driven mechanism to effect t 6 return movement of the carriage. I

10. In a riveting machine, a'work-support,

a carriage to advance thework on the support,propelling mechanism for the carri 'a e, a power-driven winding drurnto eifectft e return movement of the carriage, and a cable connecting the carriage with the drum.

11. In a riveting machine, a work-support, a reciprocating riveting tool operative on work on the support, a carriage to advance the work, a reciprocating element to intermittently actuate the carriage, and operating mechanism including means for the reciprocation of the tool, means to reciprocate the element during idle movement of, the tool, and an element for feeding rivets to work on the support, operated in conjunction with the carriage actuating element.

12. In a riveting machine, a work-support, a riveting element adapted for operation on work on the support, a container for rivets, an element adapted to automatically transfer rivets from said container, singly and at predetermined intervals to work on the support, mechanism for the,

conjoint operation of said elements and independent means for controlling the action of the transfer element while the mechanism is in operation.

13. In a riveting machine, a work-support, a riveting element adapted for operation on work on the support, a container for rivets, an element adapted to transfer rivets from said container to work on the support by fluid pressure, a source of fluid pressure connecting with the transfer ele ment and o crating mechanism for the conjoint operation of said elements and means operating in conjunction with said mechanism to automatically open and close said connection at redetermined periods in the operation of tlie riveting element.

14. In a riveting machine, a'work-support, a riveting element, a rivet-feed element including a channel for conveyin rivets to the work, and means for feeding rivets singly to the channel, a source of fluid pressure, mechanism for the conjoint operation of said elements, and means operating in conjunction with said mechanism' to automatically connect the channel with the source at predetermined periods in the operation of the machine.

'15. In a riveting machine, a work-supei-t, a riveting and punching element, an element foi' feedin single rivets intermitten'tly to work on he support by fiui pressure, a continuously movingdriving mechanisiii and means for the operation of said elements in cyclic succession by the movemerit of said mechanism. a l

16. Iii a riveting machine, a rivetfeed element ncluding a container for rivets,a rivet-chii e, a lifting forcarryihg rivets from the coiitaiher to'the ch te, and m ets gening? 53 movement of the lifting embe 'fdif removing surplus rivets carried when. V

'a riifo ting machine, a rivetfeed eliii'en't includiii a container for rivets, a rivet-chute, a lfi tinglmemher for carrying riv'e'fro 'n the malaise: w the taste, and a spr'ihg-i' iifiping Blades the iipper unish o the container fob removing. vSurrivets h m the liltiiig membe'r.

13;,111 riveting machine: ja rivet-feed dentist netting a amiss for; rive -5,, a l'i'tiiig' said container having n ihfaijis fithe sh el si'ofn of ri'vits by their needs, aha-e, hfite b i ng aj in ar ea as iee e the 'r'i'vetsaiscnargu hem the life we. mean ea i t 19'. In tiv't'iing m n-met xv tk-supmitig ting 3 passa e for rivetsto the work, a rivet chute, means for feeding rivets thereto, a tiliiihelemeht comprising a carriefrmeiiiber adapted to receive i'iv e't's from the ch te transfer them singly and interrfiit ently to saitl pas'sage, andfa cut-ofl' membei'. adaptdjho d other rivets in the chute While the carrier memher operates, and nilz'riiis' for propelling rivets through the pas sa e. g

In "a riveti llg machine, a 'vvork-suppoit having a passage for rivets to the work, rivet Q h tfte, means for feeding iivets thereto, a timing element'comprising an oscillatory carrier member having a pocket to teceive rivets from the cl iute, and transfer them singly to the passage, and an oscillatory cu't-ofi' member periodically ob s'lriict ing. the passage of rivets to the carrier mmber, and means for propelling rivets throuh the channel.

21. n rivet-feed mechanism for riveting machines, a rivet-chute, means for feedin g ritet'sthereto, and a timing element comprising an oscillatory carrier member hava pocket to reeeive rivets from the chute, and an oscillatory cutoff member adapted to periodically obstruct the passage of rivets to the carrier member.

22. In a rive't feed mechanism for riveting machines, a rivet-chute, means for feeding i i've'ts thereto, angl 'a timing element comprising an oscillatory shaft, an oscillatory carrier member adapted to receive rive ts from the vhute, an oscillatory cut-ofl' member adapted to obstruct the passage of rivets to the carrier-me her, and torsion springs connecting the salt with eachof said members, the shaft and the members having cooprative means to limit the movemeiit of the members with the shaft.

23. In a riveting machine, the combination of a work-support having a channel for the passage of rivets to holes iii the woili, a rivetin' and punching element operating on w'oii on the support, a rivet-container, a timing eleliiehtadapt ed to transfer nivets one at a time from the container to the ch nel, a source of Haiti pressure, a c iidiiit etweeii said source and, the chahne a valve.

in the conduit, an element --tb alternately open and close the valve a'nd mechanism for the operation of said elements in cyclic succession.

24. In a riveting ma hine, Work-:upport having a channel on the passageol rivets to the work, arivettphute, means for transferring rivets f 'oin the chute to the channel, a source of fluid-pressure, a connection lietween the sourceand the chaniie a valve in said connection, Brake normal attest ing the discharge of rivets from tie chute, and means for releasing the brake e5; movement of the valve to theopen position 25. In a riveting machine, the: combinat on of a Work-support, a rivetin and punching element, an element for feeding rivets to holes in the work, an element for supplying rivets to the feed-elements spaclng element adapted to intermittently advance the W'Qi'li, and mechanism for the operation of said elements in cyclic succession.

26. In a riveting machine, the combination of a Worksupport, a riveting, and punching elemeht, an element for feeding rivets to holes in the work, an elemeht for supplying rivets to the feed elemeht fluiclpresshre, a spacin element adapted to intei-mittently advance the wo'rk, and meatanisr'n for the operation of said element's iii cyclic sueoession.

27. In a riveting machine, a vvoik-su port, means for propelling a rivet to a ho e in the work, and adjusting means adapted to automatically aline the moving rivet with the hole.

28. In a riveting machine, a ivork-su port, means for propelling a rivet to a ho e in the Work, and readjustmg means adapted to automatically alin'e the moving rivet with the hole and to subsequently support the rivet in the hole.

29. In a riveting machine, a work-support, a relatively stationary mandrel. a ca-ifriage mounted to move lengthwise of the mandrel and having means for its attachment at the end of a J'ipe around the mandrel, a reciprocating ratchet bar exteriorly of the mandrel, and a gravity pawl on the garriage engaging the teeth of the ratchet 30. In a rivetin machine, a work-support, an element f or punching holes in a pipe on the support, a container for rivets in arbitrary assemblage, (o-operative elements adapted to automatically remove rivets from said container and place them singly and at predetermined intervals in an upright position in the holes of the pipe, and mechanism for the conjoint operation of said elements.

31. In a riveting machine, a pipe-support, an element for punching holes in a pipe on the support, a container for rivets in arbitrary assemblage, co-operative ele ments adapted to automatically remove rivets from said container and move them singly and at predetermined intervals through the pipe to an upright position in the holes thereof, and mechanism for the conjoint operation of said elements.

32. In a riveting machine, a hollow mandrel for the support of a pipe, an element for punching holes in a ipe on the mandrel, a container for rivets in arbitrary assemblage, oo-operative elements adapted to antomatically remove rivets from said container and move them singly and at predc termined intervals through the mandrel to an upright position in the holes of the pipe, and mechanism for the conjoint operation of said elements.

33. In a riveting machine, a Work-support having a channel for the passage of rivets to the work, a riveting element adapted for operation on work on the support, a magazine for rivets, a source of fluid pressure, a timing element to intermittently transfer rivets singly from the magazine to the channel, an element to intermittently connect the channel with the source, and mechanism for the conjoint operation of said elements.

34. In a riveting machine, a work support having a channel for the passage of rivets to the work, a riveting element adapted for operation on the work on the support, a magazine for rivets, a source of fluid pressure, a timing element to intermittently transfer rivets singly from the magazine to the channel, an element to intermittently connect the channel With the source, mechanism for the conjoint operation of said ele ments, and adjusting means actuated by the rivets under fluid pressure to automatically aline the rivets with holes in the work.

35. In a riveting machine, a work-support, a reciprocating riveting element, a

shaft in operative relation to the element, an element for feeding rivets to the support by fluid pressure, a source of fluid pressure in connection with the feed element, a valve in said connection, and mechanism actuated by rotation of the shaft to alternately open and close the valve.

36. In a riveting machine, a work-support having a channel for the passage of rivets to the work, a rivet-container, a timing element adapted to transfer rivets one at a time from the container, a rivet passage between the timing element and the channel, a source of pressure fluid connected with the passage, a valve controlling the flow of fluid to the channel, and a valve controlling the passage, and mechanism for the operation of the machine, including automatic means to intermittently open each valve alternate- 1y with relation to the other.

In testimony whereof I have aflixed my signature.

JONATHAN R. FREEZE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3053123 *Sep 16, 1959Sep 11, 1962Rosenthal LeonRiveting machines
US5231747 *Dec 21, 1990Aug 3, 1993The Boeing CompanyDrill/rivet device
US5263236 *Jan 10, 1992Nov 23, 1993The Boeing CompanyFor an electromagnetic riveting machine
US5404633 *Jan 10, 1992Apr 11, 1995The Boeing CompanyMethod of dynamically supporting a drill quill in a drill/rivet machine
US5577315 *Jun 6, 1995Nov 26, 1996The Boeing CompanyMethod of upsetting rivets
US5621963 *Jun 6, 1995Apr 22, 1997The Boeing CompanyMethod of upsetting a rivet
US5685058 *Jun 6, 1995Nov 11, 1997The Boeing CompanyMethod for direct insertion of a headed rivet into a countersunk hole
US5752306 *Jun 6, 1995May 19, 1998The Boeing CompanyMethod for upsetting a headed rivet by differential initiation of opposed electromagnetic rivet drivers
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/67, 227/100, 227/112, 227/52
International ClassificationB21J15/10
Cooperative ClassificationB21J15/32, B21J15/14
European ClassificationB21J15/32, B21J15/14