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Publication numberUS1509824 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 30, 1924
Filing dateJun 28, 1922
Priority dateJun 28, 1922
Publication numberUS 1509824 A, US 1509824A, US-A-1509824, US1509824 A, US1509824A
InventorsBooth Harold S, Marshall George G
Original AssigneeBooth Harold S, Marshall George G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of preparing substances in finely-divided form
US 1509824 A
Abstract  available in
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Sept. so, rare.

UNETED STATES.

HAROLD Si BQO'I'HI AND GEORGE G.

rarest OFFICE.

MARSHALL, or onnvi nalgn, onro.

.No Drawing.

To all who'm' z't may home-m:

Be it known that we, HAROLD S. Boom and GEORGE G. MARSHALL, citizens of the United States, and residents, respectively, of Cleveland, in the county of Cuyahoga and State of Ohio, and Cleveland, in the county of Cuyahoga and State of Ohio, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Methods of Preparing Substances in Finely-Divided Form, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

Thepresent invention relates to a method or process for obtaining a material which is dispersed in extremely finely divided condition throughout another material. This invention finds utility in numerous instances among which may be mentioned merely by way of example, colloidal solutions, emulsions and ointments. l y

In practicing the invention the material is initially prepared so that the molecules making up its structure are dispersed with respect to each other, and then the material with the molecules in the dispersed condition are introduced into another material which serves to receive the material in the dispersed molecular condition, and to maintain it in that dispersed condition.

The material which is operated upon may be placed in its dispersed condition by heating so that it is volatilized, or'it may be atomized if it is a liquid, which while not representing as complete a dispersion of the molecules of I the substance as may be realized ina volatilized condition, is nevertheless within the terms of this invention.

\Vhile we have mentioned volatilization and atomization as two means by which a material wmay be placed in what we may term its dispersed condition, we do not intend to limit ourselves in this particular.

In practicing'the invention we have employed an apparatus having a small aperture through which the material to be dis persed is injected, and upon leavingthe injector it is immediately introduced into the other material into which jected.

the substance being operated upon, such for instance, as the diameter of the injector it is to be inhave found that there are certain factswhich control the fineness or the degree of I dispersion of the particles or molecules of Application filed June 28, 1922. Serial No. 571,565.

into its original form in the material in which it is injected. Under some circumstances it may be desirable to inject with the primary material which is being put in its dispersed forms one or more other components, and one of these additional components may be inert or inactive where this is desirable, and the degree of fineness of the material which is being dispersed after injection of the material in which it is received is somewhat affected by the presence of other components or inactive material;

It may undersome circumstances be desirable to stir the material into which the dispersed substance is-injected, but this has no material effect on the invention itself.

As an application of the method or process which has above been described, we will describe the same in connection with the preparation of mercury ointment.

This we have prepared. by volatilizing mercury and passing the mercury vapor under pressure through an injector having a fine orifice and injecting the same" into- The foregoing process hasbeenbarried out by using injectors having various sizes of p The vfineness of the mercury can be controlled,'a-nd by employing the method suggested we have'ub'een able to obtain a mercury ointment in which the mercury was at least one hundred times finer than any commercial forms of mercury ointment with which we are famlliar.

It goeswithout saying that an ointment v in which the activejniaterial is thus finely divided is more active in its therapeutic uses than where theactive material is not so finely divided.

It will be obvious that as before stated it is within the terms of this invention to dilute the mercury vapor with any desireddiluting agent or gas. .1 v .It is obvious thatthis principle may be applied to the preparation of omtments,

emulsions or colloidal solutions of all kinds wherever it is possible'to volatilize or atomize or otherwlse produce a dispersed condition of one of the components of the dispersoid system to be made, and to inject i this volatiliaed vor otherwise dispersed material into another gaseous or liquid component which Will act asa receiving, protecting and holding agentwhi'ch keeps the which thevolatilized component is finely di-..

vided, as an example of which may be mentioned sulphur ointments or iodine ointments. v

Having described our invention, we claim z--- g 1. The method of preparing a substance in finely divided form, which consists in putting the substance in 'such formthat the molecules thereof are in dispersed condition,

and then injecting the substance in its dispersed condition into a suitable material which fixes and retains the said substance in its dispersedcondition.

2. The method of preparing a substance in finely divided form, which consists in putting the substance in such form that the molecules thereof are in dispersed condition,

39 and then injecting the substance in its dispersed condition into a suitable liquefied materialwhichfixes and retains the said sub- 1 ting th substance in such form that the molecules thereofare in dispersed condition,

and then in placing said substance while in dispersed condition under pressure, through a small orifice and into a suitable material which fixes and retains said substance in its dispersed condition.

4. A method of preparing a substance in finely divided form which consists in volatilizing the said substance and in injecting the substance while in volatilized condition into a suitable material which condenses the said volatilized substance but retains it and fixes it in its dispersed condition.

5. The method of preparing a substance in finely divided form which consists in volatilizing said substance and in placing the said substance whilevolatilized under pressure through a suitable orifice and into a liquefied material which condenses the said volatilized substance but retains it in its dispersed condition.

In testimony whereof, we hereunto affix our signaturesl HAROLD s. BOOTH. GEORGE e. mRsHALL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5030669 *May 15, 1990Jul 9, 1991Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyPigment dispersions
US5106533 *Mar 14, 1991Apr 21, 1992Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyUltrafine particles dispersed in aqueous and nonaqueous media; contact lenses with perfluoropolyether segments and copper phthalocyanine particles
US6682584Dec 20, 2001Jan 27, 2004Cima Nanotech, Inc.Process for manufacture of reacted metal nanoparticles
US6688494Dec 20, 2001Feb 10, 2004Cima Nanotech, Inc.Process for the manufacture of metal nanoparticle
US6689190Dec 20, 2001Feb 10, 2004Cima Nanotech, Inc.Process for the manufacture of reacted nanoparticles
US6837918Dec 20, 2001Jan 4, 2005Aveka, Inc.Process for the manufacture of nanoparticle organic pigments
EP1930063A1Dec 5, 2007Jun 11, 2008JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsgesellschaft mbHMethod for preparation of nanoparticles and apparatus for the production thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification516/31, 106/400, 516/33, 516/20, 424/644
International ClassificationA61K9/10
Cooperative ClassificationA61K9/10
European ClassificationA61K9/10