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Publication numberUS1510497 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 7, 1924
Filing dateJun 25, 1923
Priority dateJun 25, 1923
Publication numberUS 1510497 A, US 1510497A, US-A-1510497, US1510497 A, US1510497A
InventorsCharles L Keller
Original AssigneeRichardson Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roofing device
US 1510497 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 7 1924.

c/L.KELLER ROOFING DEVICE 1923 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 25.

Oct. 7 1924. 1,510,497 c. L. KELLER ROOFING DEVICE Filed June 25. 1923 2 Sheets-Sheet; 2

Patented Oct. 7, 1924.

UNITED s'rarns PATENT oFF-ICE.

CHARLES L. KELLER, OF CINCINNATI, OHIO, ASSIGNOR T THEVRIGHABDSON COMI- IPANY, 0F LOCKLANDA OHIO, A CORPORATION OF OHIO.

nooEING DEVICE.

Application filed .Tune 25, 1923. Serial No. 647,504.

To all whom t may concern:

Be it known that I, CHARLES L. KELLER,

a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Cincinnati, in the county of Hamilton and State of Ohio, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Roofin Devices, of which the following is a fu l, clear, and exact description, reference being had to the accompanying drawing, forming part of this specification.

My invention relates to devices for use in laying roofs, particularly where using composition shingles and strips, and also to roofs as laid by the use of such devices.

In a co-pending application, Serial No. 631,700 filed April 12, 1923, covering an invention of this application, I have set forth and described a device for use in laying roofs and individual shingles, which device is in the form of an S-hook and is so placed in the roof as to serve as a means for fixing the back lapl in shingle roofs.

The present invention covers the more general aspects of said structure, in which a double hook or S-hookis not necessarily used, and the back lap is still provided for, as well as spacing and, hold-down features. l The term back lap refers to that portion of a course of shingles or a single shingle, when laid on a roof, which lies beneath the next course, but one, of shingles on the roof` Thus there is a first course of shingles, laid side by side in interspaced relation, then a second course of shingles laid over this course, and interspaced to leave exposed a narrow portion of the irst course, and finally a third course, which lies over the second and blocks off the exposure 'of the firstl course. The back'lap is the extent that the third course lies over the lirst course.

In roofing, the danger point of the roof is the flue-like space left where the third course lies over the slot between shingles of the second course, as here both lire, wind, and water can be driven up to contact with the sheathing that covers the roof beneath the shingles. The underwriters requirements as to back lap/are specific, and the cutting down of the back lap dimension at once gives greater coverage of shingles on roofs.

M new devices have the function of holdlng down the shingles of each course with an overlying hook, spacing the shingles of'next underlylng course, and prescribing the distance from the top or back of a second underlying course, and the helddown butt or front edge of the course engaged by the overlying hook. They also have the function of serving as a dam to prevent fire, wind and water getting up to the roof sheathing, thereby cutting down and also insuring the minimum required back lap- The essential difference in the showing of the invention in this application over my former application, is that a hook for engaging around and under the back ends or covered ends of shingles in a roof, is

there provided for, which makes for a more expensive hook, and also limits somewhat the different ways of obtaining irregular exposures by means of shingles in a roof, likewise hinders somewhat the speed of application. y

Thus my former application is a species of hook, and this application shows and describes the hooks shown in the copending case and also several other forms of hook, and covers the general aspects of all hooks and in particular the special hooks that differ from those in the co-pending case.

I accomplish the objects set forth above by that certain construction and arrangement of parts to be hereinafter more specifically pointed out and claimed. t

In the drawings,

Figure l is a perspective view of one of.

the hooks.

Figure 2 is a like view of another form of the hooks.

Figure 3 is a sectional view of a roof showing the use of the hooks.

Figure 4; is a fragmentary plan view of a roof showing one `form or effect to be gained with my novel device.

Figure 5is a like plan view of a roof showing another form or effect gained.

Figure 6 is a further plan view showlng another form or effect to be gained.

Figure 7 is a prespective of the hook shown in my co-pending application.

I have shown in Figure 1 a back lap i tion 11,

Sorg

hook, having the body ortion 11, which is the length of a desire back lap andthe hook portion 12, which in one sense 1s a hook, ,and in another is a downwardly bent abutment, which Vis intended to be laid against the back end oii the shingle n which the hook is mounted. `At the front end of the body portion is a .hook having a stand 13, and a top 13, this hook being of the width necessary to bridge the space between two shingles laid alongside of 1t, and of the height to pass up alongthe butt end of a shingle laid on top of the two shingles .just referred to, with the top 13 of the hook lying over the top surface of the said butt.

Tn Figure 2 the hook has the body por Stand 13 and top 13, for a single hook, and at the other end of the body portion there is no hook at all. Tn use, the back end of the body portion is used as a gulde in obtaining a definite back lap, the rooter endeavoring to bring the back of thel body portion in line with the back edge of the shingle on which the hook is mounted.

lin each form of hook ll have shown .a nail hole at 14, through which a nail 1s driven to hold down the hooks.

Tn Figure 7 T have shown a hook device having body portion 11, hooks 13, 13a, and another hook at the back end havlng the delending portion 12, with the additional end 12a, ormingla member to engage beneath the back end of a shingle on which the device is mounted.

llt may be observed that the hook device ot Figure 1 can be used as is the device of Figure 2, by pressing the portion 12 down into a shingle on which the hook device of said Figure 1 is mounted.

Referring now to the roof on which this form of hook is torbe used, it should be noted that it can be used with any style or' shin le, either individual or strip, and in a wi e variety ot shapes. T have shown the use in connection with the lain rectangular shingle, which is the stan ard in root laying at the present time, and of whlch the vastl majority of roofs are laid.

Referrin first to Figure 3 it will be noted that the shlngles are laid over roof sheathing 5, there being shingles shown in courses 1, 2 and 3. T have not shown a starting strip in this View, and it will be understood that the showing has been selected to illustrate three courses of shingles without regard to the remainder of the roof. When shingles at 1 are laid down on the roof, a hook is nailed down at, say, the center of the back of each shingle in the course.

lThe hook of Figure 1 is shown as in use,

with the abutment at 12 set against the back edge of the shingles 1.

between each pair of the shingles 2, serving as the spacing guide, and resulting in the stands 13a, lying across the gap between the shin les 2, and serving as a dam against win tire, or water working jup through the gap. Hooks'are then mounted at, say, the center of the backs of the shingles 2, in the same manner as described on shingles 1.

When course 3 is laid, thel shingles 3 are spaced apart by the hooks nailed down onto shingles 2, and the hooks 13, 13 of the devices on course 1 are engaged over the butts or front ends of said shingles 3.

The result of this laying method is shown in Figure 4, wherein it will be noted that the distance trom the butts of the shingles of course 3 to the back of shingles of course 1, is defined by the body 'portion of the hook devices. This distance', as has been noted, is that termed back lap.

Tt will be noted that the spacing ot shingles in course 2 is defined by the hooks on course 1, and that the gap left between shingles 2, running up beneath the shingles of course 3, is completely blocked od.

Tn Figure 5 T have shown a roof whichis laid with the exposure ot the first course. of shingles on the starting strip being more than half of the length ot the shingles vet this course when the length oi' the back lap hooks has been subtracted. Thus it the v shingles of the irst course are 1t inches long, and the back lap hooks 2 inches long,

an even exposure on the root will be obof hooks on the back oit the starting strip, l

different e'ects can be gained.

Thus T have shown what may be assumed to be a ten inch starting strip 5, two inch hooks, and fourteen inch shingles, using the hooks of Figure 1 or Figure 7. The result is that the shingles of course 1 will be laid so that their lower edges register with the lower edge of the starting strip. The hooks on the starting stri serve as side spacers for course 1. The s ingles of course'2 are then laid, and hooked under the hooks 13, of the hook devices, being spaced laterally by the hooks on course 1.

Tt may be observed that this brings about an exposure of ei ht inches of the shin les of course 1, and t iat when course 3 is aid in like manner, as heretofore described, that the shingles of this course will overlap the shingles o't the secondcoursc ten inches, leaving a tour inch exposure of course 2. This results because course 1 is :fourteen inches long, and the hooks two inches long, and eight inches of course 1 has been exposed, so that the lower ends of the hooks on course 1 will lie two inches from the back course -1`, while the butts of course 1 leaive a four inch space, throughout whlch colirse 2 is not covered.

The same result will apply to course 4, in the showin Figure 5, which will leave exposed the full eight inches-of course 3.

Thus by starting olf courses 1 and 2 in, 'an irregular manner, the remaining alternate -starting strip, in some instances. This 1s shown at A, B, and C on the starting strip. Course 1 will then be laid over the starting stri with a regular lower edge.

bourse 2, however, will have ,a wavy outline, -as laid, similar to the thatch. effect. The hooks on course 2 may also be arranged with the back ends not always in register with the back of the shililigles, as illustrated ting at D for example, res in throwing the shingles of course 3 out of line, as to their butts.

That result is, that the roof ma have any kind of varied effect that is esired, but that, so long as no hook is laid with its back end located beyond or overlying the backend of the shingle on which it is mounted, the roof will always have a back lap throughout, which corresponds or is gretter than that for which the hooks were bui t.

Whereshin les oi different length are used, and the ack lap hooks used in each course, there will never be any danger of leaving an exposure through the roof, and all gaps between shingles will be sealed off by the standing portions 13a of the hook devices.

Also if the'shingles are to be laid with a staggered relation in courses of two thirds and one third, it is merely required that the two first'sets of hooks be roperly set, and. the rest of thereof will ollow suit.

In time of laying a roof, using my hooks, the saving is tremendous, as no lines have to be drawn on the roof, and a boy can do the work, re uiring ordinarily a highl skilled wor an. so a defectlvc sliingle can be slipped out of the roof and replaced, at an time, by merely pulling up the hook nailed down on the defective shingle, and releasing the butts of adjoining shingles from their hooked down engavement.

It makes no difference what len th of shingle is used or whether the same ength is used throughout the roof, so far as getting a tight roof is concerned. Also where shingles of like width and length are laid in a roof, andthe irst two courses properly arranged, the remainder of the roof builds itself, as it were, provided the hooks are used as intended.

The use of clinching devices instead of hooks, so long as the back lap protection feature is provided, 4will come within my invention, as will changes in shape, omission of nail holes in the S-hook style of Fi ure 7, and of my former application.

aving thus described my invention,

what I claim as new and desire to secureA by Letters Patent, is

1. A roof formed of composition shingles, laid in courses, the individual shin le units being spaced apart in courses su cient to cast a shadow and the courses overlapped, and securing devices formed of metal strips having body portions each provided with a nail hole intermediate its ends, and with a hook at the lower end, said hook having a stand of a height equal to the thickness of two shingles, and a return bent end,

said securing devices laid with their body portions placed against the shingles, nails extending through the bod portions, and shingles and into the roo deck, and the upper ends of the body portionsaligned with the top ends of the shingles, the shingles interspaced throughout the roof by the said securing devices, and the hooks engaging the butts or lower projecting ends of the shingles, saidtstands of the hooks extending from the shingles on which the hooks are placed, and damming up the s aces between the shingles interspaced by -t e securintg devices, whereby the back. lap of the roo may be cut down and exactly determined by the' length of the body portions, and curling of shingles prevented at the point where they overlie the dammedup spaces.

2. A rooting formed of composition shingles, laid in courses, the individual shingle units being spaced-apart in courses sutiiclent to cast a shadow, and the courses overlapped, and securing devices formed of metal strips having body portions each provided with a nail hole intermediate itsl ends, and with a hook at the lower end, said hook having a stand of a height equal to the thickness of two shingles, and a ret-urn bent end, said securing devices laid with their body portions placed against the shingles, nails extending through the body portlons, and shingles and into the roof deck and the upper ends of the body portions aligned Wlth the top ends of the shingles, the shin les interspaced throughout the roof by tie said securing devices, and the hooks engaging the butts or lower projecting ends of the shingles, said stands of they hooks extending from the shingles on which the hooks are placed, end dnniming up the spaces between the shingles interspersed by the securing `dei/lees, Wherebv the back lap ofl the roof may be ourJ down and exactly determined by the iength of the body portions, and curling of shingles prevertedat the point Where they overiie 1. Miene? (CHARLES L. KELLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3222831 *Jul 10, 1963Dec 14, 1965Evans Prod CoAnchoring clip for overlapping wall paneling or siding
US4089141 *Dec 1, 1976May 16, 1978George Armand HerouxApplication of siding, shingles or shakes to a wall structure
US5533313 *Aug 3, 1994Jul 9, 1996Pike; Robert D.Roof tile anchoring clip
US6367160 *Feb 17, 2000Apr 9, 2002Steve RempeSiding gauge tool
US7117651Apr 3, 2003Oct 10, 2006Certainteed CorporationRainscreen clapboard siding
US7325325Jul 13, 2004Feb 5, 2008James Hardle International Finance B.V.Surface groove system for building sheets
US7441382 *Oct 18, 2002Oct 28, 2008Certainteed CorporationClapboard siding installation clip and method of installing clapboard siding
US7472523Aug 30, 2006Jan 6, 2009Certainteed CorporationRainscreen clapboard siding
US7524555Feb 3, 2004Apr 28, 2009James Hardie International Finance B.V.Pre-finished and durable building material
US7713615Apr 3, 2002May 11, 2010James Hardie International Finance B.V.Reinforced fiber cement article and methods of making and installing the same
US7993570Oct 7, 2003Aug 9, 2011James Hardie Technology LimitedDurable medium-density fibre cement composite
US7998571Aug 16, 2011James Hardie Technology LimitedComposite cement article incorporating a powder coating and methods of making same
US8191327 *Apr 1, 2009Jun 5, 2012Firestone Building Products Company, LlcWall panel system with hook-on clip
US8281535Mar 8, 2007Oct 9, 2012James Hardie Technology LimitedPackaging prefinished fiber cement articles
US8297018Jul 16, 2003Oct 30, 2012James Hardie Technology LimitedPackaging prefinished fiber cement products
US8409380Jul 28, 2009Apr 2, 2013James Hardie Technology LimitedReinforced fiber cement article and methods of making and installing the same
US8993462Apr 12, 2007Mar 31, 2015James Hardie Technology LimitedSurface sealed reinforced building element
US20040074188 *Oct 18, 2002Apr 22, 2004Beck David HerbertClapboard siding installation clip and method of installing clapboard siding
US20070074483 *Aug 30, 2006Apr 5, 2007Certainteed CorporationRainscreen clapboard siding
US20090241455 *Apr 1, 2009Oct 1, 2009Griffiths Robert TWall panel system with hook-on clip
WO2001061272A1 *Feb 20, 2001Aug 23, 2001Steve RempeSiding gauge tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/547
International ClassificationE04D1/34
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/34, E04D2001/3414, E04D2001/3482, E04D2001/3491, E04D2001/3458
European ClassificationE04D1/34