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Publication numberUS1510924 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 7, 1924
Filing dateMar 27, 1924
Priority dateMar 27, 1924
Publication numberUS 1510924 A, US 1510924A, US-A-1510924, US1510924 A, US1510924A
InventorsPitman Schuck Harold, Stuart Daniels Ernest
Original AssigneePitman Schuck Harold, Stuart Daniels Ernest
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Parquet flooring and wall paneling
US 1510924 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 7 1924. 1,510,924

E. S. DANIELS ET AL PARQUET FLOORING AND WALL PANELING Filed March 27 1924 2 Sheets-Sheet rvws (j Harold Rim cjckaay 24/11, Ai'kornea/s Oct. 7 1924.

E. S. DANIELS ET AL PARQUET FLOORING AND WALL PANELING Filed March 27 1924- 2 Sheets-Sheet. 2

m Wgk In ant-ova Erma; 0M2 pm flaw/"0% Rm 6% I kHzorngys Patented Oct. 7, 1924.

ERNEST STUART DANIELS, OF WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF GOLUMIBIA, AND I PITMAN SOHUCK, OF EAST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY.

HAROLD PARQUET rnoonme AND WALL PANELING.

' Application filed march 27, 1924. Serial in. 702,426.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that we, ERNEST STUART DANIELS, a subject of the King of Great Britain, and HAROLD PITMAN SOHUCK, a

5 citizen of the United States, residing, re-

spectively, at Washington, in the District of Columbia, and East Orange, in the county of Essex and State of New Jersey, have 1nvented certain new and useful Improve- 1 ments in Parquet Flooring and Wall Paneling; and we do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertalns to 5 make and use the same. i

This invention is designed as an improvement upon our Patent No. 1,477,813, dated December 18, 1923, and relates to floor and wall construction and more particularly to what is commonly known as parquet flooring and wall paneling. The primary ob ect of the invention is to provide boarding material or flooring panels constructed in composite sections having meansrigid therewith for securing together, by lnterlocklng tongue and groove connections, a group or.

multiplicity of such sections in properly as sembled relation to form a floor or sealed wall without necessity for other fastemng means than said interlocking connections.

A further object is to provide flooring or wall anel material of the character referred to, a apted for use in constructin finished floors, wall panels or panelled cei lugs and the like.

The invention will be first hereinafter more particularly described with reference to the accompanying drawings, which are to be taken as a part of this specification, and then ointed out in the claims at the end of the escri tion. i

In said rawings, Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a portion of a floor embodying our invention, several sections being detached but shown in relative position for assembly or connection with ad acent and adjoining sections.

Fig. 2 is a partial plan view of a parquet floor constructed in accordance with our invention, the composite sections being formed substantially in squares and detached to illustrate the method of uniting the same.

' Fig. 3 is a sectional elevation of a portion of a 'floor taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a sectional elevation of a portion of a floor taken on the line 4.-4 of Fig. 2. v

Fig. 5 is a side elevation, partly in section, of a wall constructed from a plurality of sections having interlocking engagement with each other.

Fig. 6 is a sectional plan view of the same taken on the line 66 of Fig. 5, and

Flg. is a perspective view of a sin le composlte sectlon or panel, the loosely tting s1de strip thereof being detached.

Referring to the drawings, in which like reference numerals are used to designate corresponding parts throughout the several vlews, and particularlyto Figs. 7 and 1 to 4, 1nclus1ve; 8 denotes individual composite or rlgid sections or panels of flooring or wall material constructed in accordance with our invention and consisting, as shown, of multi ple pieces of planks, board or scrap mater1al, of equal length, joined or secured together longitudinally, with the grain of the wood in the respective pieces running in substantially the same direction. The several pieces comprisin the composite sections or panels are rigi ly secured and held closely together by means of reinforcing and retaining end shooks or splines 9 and 10 inserted under pressure within receptive transverse kerfs or grooves formed in the ed es of the sections at their respective ends, with the grain of the wood in the strips running at substantially right-angles to the grain of the wood in the panels, one of the transverse end strips 9 being counter-sunk in one end of each panel section so as to leave a continuous transverse groove in that end, while one of the wider strips or splines 10 is applied to the opposite grooved end of each composite panel sectionwith aportion thereof extended from the latter so as. to provide a transverse tongue of a width equal substantially to the depth of the groove in the opposite end of the panel. The edge 100 of each section 8 is further kerfed or grooved on both sides, with the groove running substantially parallel with th grain of the wood in the panel and of a epth equal substantially to the depth ofthe groove left by 105 the counter-sunk spline in one end thereof.

Longitudinal strips 11, providing removable tongues, are loosely fitted in the kerfs composite section and adapted for engagement with a kerfed or grooved edge in either side or end of similarly formed sections. These sections or panels may be of any desired form or size, either square or oblong, and any suitable material may be used to form'the individual panels, the several pieces of planks or scrap material being joined together longitudinally and end-wise by the means above described.

Referring now to Fig. 1, it Will be observed that a multiplicity of similarly formed sections are closely assembled together by inter-engaging tongue-an'd-groove connections with each other to form a completed floor. In order to facilitate this as- 'sembly and hold .the sections or panels rigidly together and to' give a neat and attractive appearance to the completed floor, a longitudinally! kerfed or grooved border strip or board 12 is preferably secured against the wall of the building, subad acent the ordinary floor board, with its grooved edge toward the center of the room. This strip should be extended completely around all sides of the room, or border the area to be covered with the flooring material, or if referred, a number of these strips 12, kerfed or grooved along the edges on both sides may be laid at spaced intervals across the area to be covered to roduce a bordered checkerboard effect. omposite floor sections or panels are secured in interlocking engagement with said border strip and also with each other by means of the extended tongues 10 and the loosely fitted splines 11, which are engaged within the opposing grooved edges of the border strip and the opposing ooved edge in the end or sides of similar y formed sections, according to which confronts the other. It will be noted that the ends) of the sections in which the "counter-sunk splines 9 are lodged, may be engaged or secured to the border strip 12 at substantially right-angles thereto, by means of the removable splines 11 fitted loosely between the grooved edge of the strip and the opposing grooved edge in the ends of the panels, and that successive sections may thereafter be laid end to end across the area to be covered, with their grooved ends respectively opposed to the extended s lines in the ends of preceding sections. S imilarly, the ends of the sections in which the extended splines 10 are lodged, may be engaged or secured to the border strip 12, with the splines 10 inserted within the grooved edge of the border strip, and that successive sections may thereafter belaid end to end across the area to be covered, with their respective splined ends opposed to the grooved ends of the sections preceding.

Further, the respective sections are similarly secured to each other by! interlocking tongue and groove connections, that is b means of the removable splines 11 which are fitted between the 0p osing grooved edges in the sides of immediatel adjacent sections in the manner indicate thus cf fecting a complete floor rigidly united by interlocking tongue-and-groove connections with the border strip and with each other, producing a solid floor which will be unaffected, in appearance and assembled relation with each other by contraction or -ex-- pansion of the wood under atmospheric conditions, and in which other fastening means, such as nails or-screws, will not ordinarily be required in order to hold the sections in place.

Referring now to Figs. 2 to 4, inclusive, in which a parquet floor is illustrated, it will be noted that the several composite sections are constructed in accordance with the illustration in Fig. 7, except that the sections are substantially square rather than oblong in form, and that these sections are assembled by interlocking tongue-andgroove engagement with the border strip 12 and with each other, in the manner hereinbefore described with reference to Fig. 1, except that alternate sections are laid with the grain of the wood in one section runnin at substantially right-angles to" the gram of the wood in each adjacent section, the extended splines in each section having engagement with the grooved edge in the end or one side of its adjacent section, and the loose splines 11 being similarly utilized to join the several sections together at their meeting grooved edges, thus providing a solid parquet floor 1n which few, if any, mails are required to hold the individual sections in place. In the latter illustration the composite sections or panels are secured in interlocking engagement with the border strip 12 and'with each other by means of the extended tongues 10 and the loose splines 11 fitted between the opposing grooved edges in the sides or ends of the panels, thus adapting the panels to be laid successively, at substantially right-angles to each other, with their edges flush.

"It may be observed that any tendency of the wood to warp will be compensated for by means of the extended splines 10 and the loose splines 11, respectively, so that the floor will not buckle nor shrink so as to cause gaps between the several sections.

Referring now to Figs. 5 and 6, in which the manner of assembling the composite sections to form a wall or ceiling is illustrated 13 denotes the ordinary vertical joists or a frame building .or structure, said joists being longitudinall grooved on opposite sides to form para lel guide-ways for the wall or ceiling panel sections, the latter being identical with the form illustrated in Fig. 7. The several sections are slidably fitted between a pair of grooved joists and allowed to rest m position, one upon the other, as clearly shown in Fig. 5. The splines 11 are loosely fitted within the opposing grooves in adjacent sides of the respective sections and also between the rooves in the counter-sunk spline ends of t e respective sections, so as to extend into the opposing groove in the joist,13, thus holding the respective panels in position and providing a sealed wall or ceilin which may be expediently and economically assembled or torn down, as the case may be. It will here be noted that the wall or ceiling sections may be thus assembled with the grain in the respective sections running substantially parallel with each other and at right-angles to the joists or substantially parallel with each other and parallel with the joists or alternately with the grain in successive sections running at substantially right-angles to each other.

We desire it to be understood that the word flooring as used in the appended claims is intended to include not only flooring material but wall panels, partitions and panelled cealings and various other structures in which our invention might be used. Furthermore, in the broader aspects of the invention, and for some other purposes, other material than wood might be used to form similarly tongue-and-grooved sections or panels adapted to perform the same functions as sections formed of wood, and therefore we do not desire to limit our invention to parquet flooring or wall panels made entirely of wood, although the latter material is preferable.

It may be here noted that gum-wood and other kinds of plentiful wood which have heretofore been practically useless by reason of their tendency to warp, may be profitably and economically employed so that we are enabled to produce, at comparatively nominal expense, a nicely finished and durable flooring material by the utilization of heretofore unusable and waste products of lumber, such as short pieces of flooring ma terial which are usually cast off and used as fire-wood. More particularly are we enabled to use hard but inexpensive wood which is unfit for use as ordinary hardwood flooring because of its tendency to split, and which for this reason has a very low market value as compared with ordinary flooring material. 7

Having thus described our invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is:

1. Individually formed composite floor and wall pannel sections comprising 'multiple pieces of material secured together by transverse splines lodged within registering grooves in the ends of the respective' pieces, the splines in one end of the sections being and wall panel sections comprising multiple pieces of material of equal length secured together by common transverse splines lodged within registering grooves in the end edges of the respective pieces, the splines in one end of the sections bein'g counter-sunk so as to leave a groove in that end, and the splines in the opposite ends of the sections being extended therefrom so as to provide a transverse tongue of a width equal substantially to the depth of the groove in their other ends, the edges of said sections being corres ondingly grooved along both sides to a epth equal substantially to the depth of. the grooves in their ends, together with removable splines adapted to fit engageably into the grooved ends or sides of the sections.

3. A flooring comprising a plurality of individually formed composite sections interlocked and held together iii assembled relation by interlocking longitudinal and transverse tongue-and-groove connections theretween, the longitudinal grooves extending along the edges on opposite sides of the sec-" tions, the individual sections being composed of relatively short pieces of material secured together edge to edge,- by transverse splines pressed into registering margmal grooves in the ends of the respective pieces, the splines in one end of the sections being counter-sunk so as to leave a transverse marginal groove in that end, and the splines in the opposite ends of the sections extending there-from so as to provide a transverse tongue therefor.

4. A flooring comprising a plurality of individually formed composite sections interlocked and held together in assembled relation by removable interlocking longitudinal and transverse .tongue-and-groove connections therebetween, the longitudinal grooves extending along the edges on opposite sides of the respective sections, and the transverse grooves extending along the edge on one end of the respective sections, the individual sections being composed of relatively short pieces of material frictionally secured together edge to edge, by transverse splines pressed into registering marginal grooves in the ends of the respective pieces, the splines in one end of the sections being counter-sunk so as to leave a transverse marginal groove in that end, and the splines in the opposite ends of the sections extending therefrom so as to provide a transverse tongue therefor, together with a plurality of removable longitudinal splines adapted to fit interchangeably between the grooved ends and sides of the composite sections and cooperatively interlock the same together in assembledjrelation, edge to edge.

e. A parquet flooring comprising a plurality of individuall formed composite sections interlocked an held together in assembled relation by interlocking marginal tongue and groove connections, the individual sections being composed of multiple pieces of material frictionally secured together edge to edge "by transverse splines pressed into grooves in their edges, the spline in one end of each section being counter-sunk so as to leave a groove in that end, and the spline in the opposite end of each section having a portion extended therefrom to provide a transverse tongue in such end, the edges of the several sections being correspondingly grooved along both sides to a depth equal substantially to the depth of the groove in their ends, together wlth a plurality of removable longitudinal splines adapted interchangeably to fit between opposed grooves in the ends or sides of the several composite sections and cooperatively interlock the same together, edge toedge, whereby the sections may be assembled with the grain of the wood in each section running at substantially right-angles to the grain of the wood in adjoining sections.

6. A flooring comprising a grooved border member and a plurality of individually formed composite sections interlocked and held together in assembled relation by interlocking marginal tongue and groove connectrons, the in ividual sections bein composed of multiple ieces of material trictionally secured toget er edge to edge by transverse splines pressed into grooves in their edges, the spline in one end of each section being counter-sunk so as to leave a groove in that end and the spline in" the opposite end of eachsection having a continuous portion extended therefrom to provide a transverse ton e in such end, the edges of the several sections bein I correspondingly grooved along both sies to a depth equal substantially to the depth of the groove in their ends, together with a plurality of removable splines adapted interchangeably to fit between opposed grooves in the ends or sides of adjoining sections and between opposed grooves in the border member and its adjacent sections,to cooperatively interlock the same together edge to edge, whereby the sections may be assembled to cover an area with the grain of the wood in the several sections running substantially parallel with or atan angle to the grain of the wood in ado1n1ng sections.

In testimony whereof we aifix our signatures in the presence of witnesses.

ERNEST STUART DANIELS. Witnesses:

CHARLEfi A. GUILD, 1E. HARRY Lannnnne.

HAlllG LD Pll'lMAN SCHUGK. Witnesses:

CLAnrssa Hones, JOHN C. Pnnn'r on.

(Ell

till

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/391, 52/574, 52/412, 52/802.1
International ClassificationE04F15/04
Cooperative ClassificationE04F15/04
European ClassificationE04F15/04