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Publication numberUS1512491 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1924
Filing dateOct 25, 1921
Priority dateOct 25, 1921
Publication numberUS 1512491 A, US 1512491A, US-A-1512491, US1512491 A, US1512491A
InventorsHenry L Scott
Original AssigneeHenry L Scott & Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Testing machine
US 1512491 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. L. SCOTT TESTING MACHINE Filed Oct. 25, 1923 4 Sheets-Sheet l Swuwwtoz Mi/am .Oct 21 1924. 1,512,491

- r H. L. SCOTT TESTING MACHINE Filed Oct. 25 192] 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Oct. 21'. 1924. 1,512,491

H. L. SCOTT TESTING MACHINE Filed Oct. 25, 1921 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 n j m Q Q Q Q N Oct. 21 1924; 1,512,491

H. SCOTT TESTING MACHINE Filed 001;. 25, 1921 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 iii ill!) Elli UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

HENRY L. SCOTT, 0F PROVIDENCE, BHODE i SLAND, ASSIGNOR TO HENRY I. SCOTT &

COMPANY, OF PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND, A COPARTNEBSHIP COKPRIBIHG ,BEHBY In. SCOTT AND DAVID C. SCOTT.

TESTING HAOHIHE.

Application filed October 25, 1921. Serial Ho. 510,347.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, HENRY L. Soon, a citizen of the llnited States, residin at Providence, in the county of Provi ence and State of Rhode Island, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in 'lesting Machines, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to an improved machine for testing the strength or stretch of materials, and has for its object to provide in such a machine a weight arranged to be connected to the specimen to be tested and mounted upon a movable sup ort adapted to be inclined to permit t e weight mounted thereon to exert a pull on the specimen, the amount of pull being determined by theetlect of gravity upon the weight controlled by the angle or inclination.

A lurther object of the invention is to provide operating means which may be driven-at a constant speed to impart to the support a varying rate or inclination where by a unitorml increasing pull on the specimen may he 0 taincd.

A still further object or the invention is the provision of mechanism adapted to exert this uniformly increasing pull upon the specimen and at the same time automatically compensate for or talre up the stretch of the material without afl'ecting the uniformity of the pull.

With these and other objects in view, the

invention consists of certain novel features oi oonstruction,- as will he more fully described, and particularly pointd out in the appended claims. in the accompanying drawings:

Figure l is a side elevation of hey improved testing machine partly in section and with portions removed to better illustrate the essential operating parts. Figure 2 is a front elevation of the ma chine.

Figure 3 is a rearelevation or the machine. v

Figure 4 is a top view of the two rolling weights and the frame connectlng them together also showing the outer frame for controlling the increments of the weights, the main framework of the machine being removed.

Figure 5'is a side elevation illustrating the pull-indicating dial and. portion of its operating mechanism.

Figure 6 is a dis. ammatic view showin a double form of t e wei hts and inclined plane mechanism by whio a pull may be exerted in opposite directions upon the specimen to be tested. J

Figure 7 illustrates another modification of the incline plane and weight construction, showing the weight as exerting a direct pull upon the specimen, one end of which is fixed against movement.

Figure 8 is a diagram illustratin the tilting of the beam at a series of di ployed to exert a pull on the specimen, a V

swinging endulum serving to provide the resisting e ement. in this type or machine as s well known the resistancejot the dulum varies, increasing as it swings rem the vertical also the rate of swing of the pendulum varies under a given speed of screw caused by the elasticity of materials and consequently the rate or load varies with the elasticit of the goods being tested. To overcome it ese serious dificulties and obtain more nearly ideal results it have constructed a machine adap to operate upon the principle out the weight rolling upon an inclined plane, in which the weight is connected to the specimen to he tested and when the plane which supports the weight is tipped the weight is caused to exert a pull upon the goods proportional to the degree or inclination of the plane or support, means losing provided whereby a constant extent of rolling movement of the weights speed of the actuating member is caused to move the support at such a speed as to produce a uniformly increasing pull upon the goods being tested, the weight being also so arranged as to automatically take up or compensate for the stretch of the same, and

the following is a detailed description of'one means by which these results may be accomplished With reference to the drawings, 10 designates one form of framework for supporting the mechanism upon a base 11. On the upper portion of this frame I have mounted bearings 12 adapted to receive trunnions 13 extending laterally from the inclinable beam 15 which may be of the usual walking beam construction. This beam is shown as being provided with plain or finished bearing surfaces 16 disposed on either side of its supporting trunnions 13 and on these plain surfaces I have shown as being mounted a pair of rolling weights 17 and 18, the weight 17 being preferably heavier than the weight 18 so as to slightly overbalance the lighter weight and always maintain a downward pressure on its end of the beam.

In order to operatlvely connect these rolls together I have provided two side bars 19 to which the respective rolls are pivoted on shafts 20 and 21;

These side bars 19 are provided with end cross bars 22 and a middle cross bar 23.

In order to control the extent of the rolling movement of. these weights on their respective supporting surfaces, I have provided an outer frame 24 which is secured at 25 to the side frames 26 on the walking beam and a front rod 27 extends from the cross bar 22 of the roll'frame through a hole in the cross bar 28 ofthe roll-controlled frame, the end of this rod being threaded as at 29 and provided with adjusting nuts 30 which are adapted to bring up against the flexible spring 31 to absorb the shock and limit the after each testing operation, and I have also provided a rod 32 which extends from the rear of the roll frame through the cross bar 33 of the roll-controlling frame. This rod is also threaded on its end at 34 and provided with adjusting nuts 35 adapted to bring up against the outer surface of this cross bar to limit the forward movement of the rolls when the walking beam has returned to nor,- mal position.

In some instances when it is desired to exert a vertical pull upon the specimen to be tested, I have mounted a pulley 36 in suitable anti-friction bearings (not shown) on the trunnion shaft 13 and over this pulley I have led a connecting member such as a chain 37 attached at one end at 38 to the cross bar 23 of the roll-frame while its opposite end as illustrated in Figure 1, is connected to the upper specimen clamp39. This upper clamp 39 is designed to be connected to one end of a specimen 40 while the clamp 41 is connected to the opposite end of the specimen, the latter clamp being adapted to be adjusted vertically to some extent by the threaded wheels 42 and 43 acting upon a screw 44.

It is found in practice desirable to provide simple and effective means by WhlCh the weight-supporting surface of the walking beam may be tipped or drawn downwardly at a uniform speed and at the same time impart to the said supporting surface a varying rate of inclination in order to cause the weight supported thereon to exert a uniformly increasing rate of pull on a specimen whereby the graduations on the indi-,

cating instrument may be spaced uniformly.

In order to accomplish this the walking beam must be tilted through a series of unequal angles which gradually increase in magnitude as illustrated in the diagram shown in Figure 8, that is, the drop of the end of the beam asillustrated by the radial lines a is ina direct progression hence if the beam is guided in a vertical path as illustrated at b with uniform increments the beam will tip through the unequal angles shown and wi 1 cause the weight to exert a uniformly increasing pull on the specimen bein tested permitting the load to be read on a dial having uniformly-spaced graduations.

To accomplish this in a simple and ractical way, I have provided a vertical -dis posed screw 45 having a cross head 46 secured at its ends 47 to the vertically movable guide rods 48 which slide in upper bearings 49 and in lower bearings 50.

On these guide rods I have secured a transversely slotted yoke 51 in each of which is slidably mounted a guide block 52 which receives the end of a pivot pin 53 extending laterally from either side of the walking beam the same being located so that their axes are on the same plane with the pivotal axis of the beam, which plane is at a right angle to the pull of the screw when the beam is in its normal or horizontal position.

The lower end of this operating screw is engaged by the worm gear nut 54 driven by the worm 55 from the'motor 56 through a belt 57, worm 58, gear 59, jack shaft 60, ears 61, clutch 62, shaft 62, and train of gears 63, to move downward at a constant speed and so impart a varying rate of inclination to the walking beam.

One member of the clutch is mounted on the usual feather key (not shown) to be operated through a yoke 106 by an endways movable shaft 107. This shaft is adapted to be engaged at its outer end by the arm (34" on the lever 64 see Figure 2 to force this shaft endways to connect the gear portion of the clutch to the shaft 62, at the same time permitting the trip lever 108 to engage the notched collar 109 to hold this clutch in engagement against tension of spring 110. The inward endways movement of shaft 107 causes its end to engage that of shaft 111 to move the yoke 115 to release the cone clutch and at the same time permit the lip of the lever 112 to enigage the notched collar 113 to hold the same against tension of spring 114.

When it is desired to arrest the downward motion of the screw 45 the lever 108 is pressed downwardly releasing the latch 109 causing the shaft 107 under tension of spring 110 to throw out the toothed clutch. When it is required to reverse the action of the screw the latch lever 112 is pushed downwardly disconnecting the latch 113 which causes the shaft 11 under action of the spring 114 to enge the clutch 65 and through the gears 66 and 63 drive the screw upward to return the beam with its weights to normal.

In some instances the operating mechanism may be caused to reverse automatically if, desired at the end of a predetermine stroke by the use of a stopping and reversing mechanism similar to that described and illustrated in my prior'Patent No. 1,335,402, of March 30, 1920.

In some instances I mount a graduated dial 67 see Figure 5, upon a standard 68 suported on the main frame, the dial hand 69 in mounted on oneend of a short shaft 70, t e opposite end having mounted thereon a pinion 71 adapted to engage rack teeth 72 formed on one of the guide rods 48 whereby the vertical movement of the screw acts through this rack and pinion to cause the hand to indicate on the dial the amount of ull exerted upon the specimen being tested, which is figured by multiplying the wei ht of the rol s by the natural sine of the ang e of inclination of their supporting beam making proper allowance for friction.

In some instances in order to record the amount of pull exerted upon a specimen I have mounted a chart 73 to slide in ways 74, the same being controlled in its movement by the vertical movement of the screw through the flexible connector 75 leading over the pulley 7 5 and which is fastened at one end at 76 to the chart and at its opposite end 77 to a bracket 78 on the cross head 46, a weight 79 being connected to the chart to move it in one direction as the screw is drawn downwardly.

A recording pen 80 rests against the face of this chart and is supported on the arm 81 from the head 82 which head is provided with an arm 83 in which is mounted a screw 84 adapted to rest against the under side of the clamp member 39, the head being under tension of a spring 85 acting through the lever 86 and flexible connection 87, to cause this pen-carrying ead to follow the upward movement of the upper clamp 39 and by which movement the pen is caused to reamount of pull being indicated on cord the stretch of the goods on the chart while a lateral movement of the chart causes the pen to record the number of pounds of ull or other desired unit of measure exerted by the weight upon the specimen being tested.

It is found in practice desirable, in some instances to provide means for exerting a pull simultaneously in opposite directions upon the specimens to be tested. To accomplish this I have provided a structure diagrammatically illustrated in Figure 6, in which two beams 88 and 89 are pivotally mounted to carry the weights 90 and 91 respectively, both of which are connected to osite ends of a specimen 92 and means inc uding a gear 93 and pinions 94 being provided for operating through screws 95 to simultaneously tilt or incline the beams 88 and 89 in opposite directions whereby the weights 90 and 91 are caused to simulta neously exert a uniform pull in opposite d directions on opposite ends of the specimen.

In still other cases it has been found advantageous to connect one end of the specimen to a fixed clamp and to exert a pull in a direct line upon the opposite end of the specimen, which efiect may be produced in a simple and practical way by such a construction as is lllustrated in Figure 7, in which the single beam 96 is pivotally mounted and adapted to be controlled in its tipping action by a screw 97. On this beam is mounted a weight 98 having a clamp 99 connected to one end of the specimen 100 while the opposite end of the specimen is connected to a clamp 101 fixed in a bracket 102 on the beam, whereby when the beam is tipped by lowering the screw the weight 98 exerts a direct pull upon the specimen, the a scale is indi- 103, while the carcated upon a scale ried by the wei ht.

By the use 0 my improved form of testing machine of the weight movable upon an inclinable plane, it will be observed that by driving the operating screw at a constant stretch of the goods 104 by a pointer speed, the rate of inclination of the weight support is varied to such an extent as to cause the weight to exert a uniformly increasing pull on the specimen whereby an indicating or recording device may be provided with uniformly spaced graduations; also by this construction wherein the weight moves along the plane, the stretch of the goods is automatically taken up without affectiing the uniformity of the pull on the The foregoing description is directed solely towards the constructions illustrated, but I desire it to be understood that any mechanical means for operating an inclined plane to cause a weight mounted thereon to exert a pull upon a. specimen to be tested,

will fall within the spirit of this invention, the scope of which is defined and limited only by the terms of the appended claims.

claim: 1. An improved method of testing materials which consists in mounting a weight on an inclinable plane, connecting the weight increasing pull on the spec'men. An improved method of testing materials which consists in mounting a weight on an inclinable plane, connecting the weight to the specimen to be tested, and inthe plane to permit the weight to exert an increasing pull on the specimen and measuring the inclination by the movement of the plane to show the amount of pull exerted on the specimen.

n improved method of testing materials which consists in mounting a weight on an inclinable plane, connecting the Weight to the specimen to be tested, and imparting a varying rate of inclination to the plane to exert a uniformly increasing pull on the specimen.

An improved method (if testing materials, which consists in mounting a weight plane connecting Weight to the specimen to be tested, moving an actuating member at a constant rate to impart a varying rate of inclination to the plane to exert a uniformly increasing rate of pull on the specimen to be tested.

5. In a testing machine, weight mounted to move along on said supactuating means for inclining the support to cause the weight to move and exert a pull on the specimen.

inclining the support to cause exert a pull on the specimen, and a uniformly graduated member for indicating the amount of pull upon the specimen.

8 In a testing machine, a support, a weight movably mounted on v t e support to cause the weight to exert a the upon the weight controlled by the angle of inclination of the support.

9. In a testing machine, a support, a. 1

of pull on the specimen.

11. In a testing machine, a support, a weight mounted to roll on said support means for connecting said weight to a specimen to be tested, means driven at a constant y increasing rate of pull on the specimen, and means for measuring the effect of the pull upon the specimen.

12. Ina testing machine, a support, a weight mounted to roll on said support and adapted "to be connected to a specimen to be tested, and means for inclining the sup port to permit the weight by its gravity to exert a pull on the specimen.

13. In a testing machine, weighted element mounted to roll on said support, means for connecting said element to a specimen to be tested, and means for inclining the support to cause the element to exert a pull on tl pull b element multiplied of inclination of the support.

4. In a testing machine, a movable member adapted to be connected to appl pull to e specimen, said pulling mem er also serving to automatica 1y compensate for the stretch of the specimen whereby a constant rate of load is maintained independently of the stretch.

15. In a testing machine, a support, a Weight mounted to roll on said support, a member connecting said weight to the specimei to be tested, and means for inclining sai a support, a

taneously take ,up the men.

16. In a testing machine, an inclinable support, a power exerting element mounted to roll on said support adap nected to exert a direct pull upon the specimen to be tested, and actuating means for imparting an inclining movement to said support to cause said element to exert a constant increment of load per unit of time.

17 In a testing machine, a support, a weight moyably mounted thereon, means for connecting said weight directly tothe specimen to be tested, and screw-actuated means for inclining said support to cause said weight to exert a constant increment of load per unit of time upon the specimen.

18. In a testing machine, a support, a weight movably mounted on said support, means by which said weight may be connected to a specimen to be .tested, means for inclining the support to cause the weight to exert a ull on the specimen, and means for indicating the amount of pull exerted.

19. In a testing machine, a support, a weight movably mounted on said support, means for connecting said weight to a specimen to be tested, means for inclining the support to cause the weight to exert a pull on the specimen the amount of pull being.

determined by the gravity of the weight and the angle of inclination of the support, and means for indicating the stretch of the specimen and the amount of pull exerted.

20. In a testing machine, inolinable supports, a pair of oppositely-movable powerexerting elements mounted to move along on said supports and adapted to be connected to pull uniformly in opposite directions upon a specimen to be tested indepcndently of the elongation of the specimen, and means for indicating the amount of pull exerted.

21. In a testing machine, two supports, a weight movably mounted on each of said supports, means for oppositely inclining said S PPOItS, and means for connecting each of said weights to the specimen to be tested to pull in opposite directions thereon.

22. In a testing machine, a pivotally mounted support, a weight mounted to roll on said support and adapted to be connected to a specimen to be tested, means for rotating said support on its pivot to incline its supporting surface to cause said weight to exert a pull on the specimen.

23. In a testing machine, two supports, a weight mounted to roll on each of said supports, means for oppositely inclining said supports simultaneously, means for connecting each of said weights to the specimen tobe tested to pull in opposite directions thereon, and means for measuring the efi'ect of the pull upon the specimen.

24:. In a testing machine, a pivotally mounted support,'a weight mounted to roll on said support and adapted to be connected to a specimen to be tested, means for tipping said support on its pivot causing said weight to exert a pull on the specimen, and means for indicating the amount of pull.

25. In a testing machine, a support, a weight movably mounted on said support, meansby which said weight may be connected to a specimen to be tested, and screwactuated means for inclining the support to cause the weight to exert a pull on the specimen.

26. In a testing machine, a support, a weight mounted to roll on said support and adapted to be connected to a specimen to be tested, and screw-actuated means for imparting to said support a varying rate of inclination to cause the weight to exert a constantly increasing rate of pull on the specimen.

27. In a testing machine, a support, a weight mounted to roll on said support and adapted to be connected to a specimen to be tested, and a screw driven at a constant speed for imparting a varying rate of inclination to said support to cause the weight to exert a constant rate of pull on the specimen.

28. In a testing machine, a support, a weight movably mounted on said support, means for connecting said weight to a specimen to be tested, means whereby the inclining of the support causes the weight to exert a vertical pull on the specimen. the amount of pull being determined by the gravity of the weight and the an le of inclination of the support, and means or showing the amount of pull exerted.

29. In a testing machine, a pivoted beam, a weight mounted to roll on said beam and adapted to be connected to the specimen "to be tested, an endways movable driving member provided with a transversely-dis posed slot, and a connecting member in said beam slidably engaging said slotted portion whereby a uniform endways movement of said driving member imparts a variably tipping rate to said beam.

30. In a testing machine, a pivoted beam, a weight mounted to roll on said beam and adapted to be connected to the specimen to be tested, an endways movable driving member provided with a transversely-disposed slot, and a connecting member in said beam slidably engaging said slotted portion whereby a uniform endways movement of said driving member imparts a variable rate of inclination to said beam, and means for measuring the effect of the pull exterted upon the specimen.

31. In a testing machine, a pivoted support, a pair of weights movably mounted on said support one on each side of its pivot bearing, means for operatively connecting said rolls together, means for connecting said rolls to pull upon the specimen to be tested, and means for inclining said support.

32. In a testing machine; a pivoted support, a pair of rolling weights movably mounted on said support one on each s1de of. its pivot bearing, a frame for operatively connecting said weights together, means whereby said weights may be connected to the specimen to be tested, means for 1nclining the support, and means for limiting the movement of said weights on said support. 7

33. In a testing machine, a pivoted sup- 5 port, a weight mounted to roll on said su port, flexible means for connecting said weights to the specimen to be tested, a ulley over which said connection 1e to change the angle of pull on the specimen,

and means for inclinin said support on its 10 pivot to cause the weig t to exert a pull on the specimen.

In testimonywhereof I aflix my signature.

HENRY L. SCOTT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2453576 *Mar 2, 1945Nov 9, 1948Electroloy Company IncSpot weld tester
US2472927 *Oct 10, 1944Jun 14, 1949Celanese CorpTesting device for filamentary material
US2584282 *Apr 4, 1944Feb 5, 1952Western Electric CoHolding apparatus for testing cable
US4535636 *Mar 19, 1984Aug 20, 1985The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space AdministrationTensile testing apparatus
US6112589 *May 14, 1997Sep 5, 2000The Penn State Research FoundationFiber tester
Classifications
U.S. Classification73/792, 73/806, 73/826
International ClassificationG01N3/14
Cooperative ClassificationG01N2203/0033, G01N3/14
European ClassificationG01N3/14