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Publication numberUS1516243 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1924
Filing dateNov 23, 1920
Priority dateNov 23, 1920
Publication numberUS 1516243 A, US 1516243A, US-A-1516243, US1516243 A, US1516243A
InventorsRay P Perry
Original AssigneeBarrett Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roofing
US 1516243 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nw., 1s, E924. @516,243

R. P. PERRY ROOFING Filed Nov. 25. 1920 l flN-VENTOR Patented Nov. 18, 1924. y

UNITED {STAT-ES PATENT OFFICE.

BAY P.'PERRY, 0F UPPER MONTCLIR, JERSEY, ASSIGNOB T0 THE BARRETT COMPANY, A CORPORATION-F NEW JERSEY.

Application led November 23, 1920. Serial No. 425,964'.

tain new and useful Improvements in Roof-y ings, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to an improvement 10 in roong materials of the class that is made of a saturated felt base. or base of fibrous material saturated with 'waterproofing material and coated with plastic material, and

having a 'layer of wear-resisting materiall applied to the surface of the coat-ing materra Heretofore in using roofing material of this sort the same has been unsatisfactory on account of the monotonous appearance it presents when installed on a roof, and also when the same is made in the form of shingles the corners often curl and present an unsightly appearance.

One. of the objects of the present invention is to produce a shingle, strip or sheet of manufactured roofing material Ahaving a saturated fibrous base, which shingle will not have the monotonous appearance when applied to the roof and which will not tend to curl at the corners when installed. Another object is to produce 'a shingle by which a variety of ornamental eiects can be produced by properly installing the same, and `also the customer can be given an option of installing a roof having the color or colors hedesires exposed to view. l l

In carrying out this invention a sheet of fibrous material is produced, which sheet is commonly known as the felt Ibase in manul factured roofing, and saturated in the usual way, after which a portion thereof is covered with suitable plastic material such as pitch or asphalt of suitable thickness, and another portion thereof is covered with a thin coating of the same material. The thick and thin coatingsof 4plastic material are preferably respectively applied on opposite sides of the same portions of the shin le, strip or sheet. A layer of course partlcles of granular material, such as slate, stone, gravel, etc., is applied to the coatings of thick plastic material, and layers ,of fine particles of anular material of the same sort are ap ied to the thin coatings of plastic material. In order that the customer may be enabled to exercise la choice, the granular materials applied upon opposite sides will differ from each other in color, so that the customer may, from one batch ofthe material, install a roof of any one of two or more colors.

The invention will be understood from the following description taken in connection with the drawings, in which- Fig. 1 is a side view of a shingle;

Fig. 2 is a side view of a modification;

Fig. 3 is a side view of another modification; and

Fig. 4 is a plan view of a section of a roof made from such shingles as the one shown in Fig. 2.

In the drawings reference characters 1, 12, and 13 refer to the felt base or sheet which may be saturated in the ordinary way with awaterproofing material. Asshown in Fig. l, the felt base 1 is covered on one end with thick coatings 2, 2 of plastic material. To

. the coating 2 of plastic material is applied a layer 3 of coarse granular material of one Acolor,'say red, while to the coating 2 is applied a layer 3 of coarse granular material of another color, say green. As shown in Fig. 1, the other portion of thebase 1 is coated on the two respective sides with thin coatings 4'and 4 of plastic material, and to the coating 4 is applied a layer 5 of fine granular material preferably of the same sort as the layer 3, while to the coating 4 is applied a layer 5 of line granular material preferably of the same sort 'as the layer 3.

The shingle shown in Fig. 2 is similar to that shown in Fig. 1, except that instead of having substantially the respective halves of one side of the shingle covered with a thick and thin coating respectively, as shown in Fig. 1, the shingle shown in Fig. 2 has substantially one-thlrd of its area -at one. end covered with thick coatings 22 and 22 of plasticl material vand layers 32 and 32 ofcourse granular material, and substantially one-third of its area at its middle portion covered with thin coatings 42 and 42 of plastic material to which are applied layers 52 and 5', of fine granular material, while the remaining area of the felt base 12 is not covered granular material.

vIn the modilication shown in Fig. 3 the base 1, is covered at its two respectlve ends with plastic or for about One-third of the way wah thick coatings 2 and 2"3 of thick plastic material,

to whlch are applied layers 33 and 3a O'I' Coarse granular material. The four granular layers 33 and 33 will preferably be respectively either two, three, or four different colors, thereby giving the user a wide variety of choice as to the color which will be exposed when the strip or shingle is installed. The middle portion of the base 13 will be covered on its two respective sides with thin coatings 43 and 43 of plastic material and to the same. will be applied layers 53 and 53 of fine granularmaterial 'corresponding in color to the adjacent layers of coarse granular material.

It will be obvious from an inspection of `Fig. 4 that when the roofing sheet is cut into the shape of shingles as indicated the user may install the same with the chosen color of coarse granular material exposed to View, so that the lower edge of the shingles in one course overlaps the upper edge of the layer of coarse granular material in an adjacent lower course. yWhen so installed a space between two shingles of` a course will ex ose to view a small section of fine Igranu ar material on a shingle in a lower course. This is clearlyindicated at 6 in Fig. 4; In this way no shingle in any row will have any portion thereof that is not covered with granular material exposed to the weather.

It will be evident from the drawings and the description that with Aas hingle made as shown and described the shingle will have a very thick-edge exposed to view when in-v stalled, therebyenhancing the appearance) and also renderingI the curling of the corners( less likely to happen, while at the same time an inordlnate amount of material is not required due, to the fact that thin coatings of plastic and thin layers of granular material are usedon the portions that are unexposed to the weather. In this wat7 an added economy iseected in that the disposition of the materials used in makina' the shingle is such that less ofl the same is used in places that are not necessary, and at the same time` a shingle is produced that would Vnot be too heavy or too expensive for the purposes for which it is designed.

It is to be understod that the expression shingle is used herein to indicate either a single shingle or a stripof roofin material or4 a so-called multi-shingle that is formed by cutting notches in the edge of one portion covered on both sides with thick layers of coating material and another portion covered with thin layers of coating material, said thick layers being covered with coarse wear-resistin-g material and said thin layers being covered with line wear-resisting material. l

2. A shingle of the class described having one portion covered on both sides with thick layers of coating material and another portion covered wlth thin layers of coating material, said thick layers being covered with coarse mineral wear-resisting -material and said thin layers beingl covered with line mineral wear-resisting material.

3. A shingle of the class described having one portion covered on both sides with thick layers of coating material and another por.

tion covered with thin layers of coating masoA terial, said thick layers being covered with- Y coarse wear-resisting material and said thin layers being covered -wlth fine wear-resisting material, the wear-resisting material on one side being of -a dilerent sort from that on the other side. i

4. A vshingle of the class described having one portion that is to be exposed to the weather covered with a thick layer of plastic material and a layer of coarse granular ma.-

terial and having another portion covered with a thin layer of plastic material and line granular material.

5. A shingle lof the class described havingA one portion that is to be exposed to the weatherl covered on each side with a thick layer of plastic material and a layer of coarse granular material and havin another portion covered on each side wit a thin layer of plastic material and fine granular material. i

6. A shingle of the ciassyde'scribed having one portion that is to lie-exposed to .the

weather covered oneach side 'with a thickv layer lof plastic material and a` layer of coarse granularmaterial and having another ortion covered on each .side with a thin ayer of plastic material and line granular o material, the colors of the said granular material on the two respective sides being different froin each other.

A Intestimony whereof I aix m signature. RAY P. ERRY.

ilo

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5611186 *Nov 30, 1994Mar 18, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US5666776 *Aug 30, 1995Sep 16, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasFor enhancing the appearance of depth of the shingle
US7877949 *Feb 29, 2000Feb 1, 2011Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcShingle for optically simulating a slate roof
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/208
International ClassificationE04D1/28
Cooperative ClassificationE04D2001/005, E04D1/28
European ClassificationE04D1/28