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Publication numberUS1516384 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1924
Filing dateOct 1, 1923
Priority dateOct 1, 1923
Publication numberUS 1516384 A, US 1516384A, US-A-1516384, US1516384 A, US1516384A
InventorsKamada Richard R
Original AssigneeKamada Richard R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heel for shoes
US 1516384 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 18, 1924- 1,516,384

R. R.KAMADA HEEL FOR SHOES Filed. Oct. 1, 1923 I L BY ATTORNEYS Patented Nov. 18, 1924.

UNITED STATES RICHARD R. KAMADA, OF NEW YORK, N. i.

HEEL FOR SHOES.

Application filed October 1, 19293.

To all 70710771, it may concern.

Be it known that I RICHARD H. KAMADA, a subjectof the Emperor of Japan, and a resident of the city of New York, borough of Manhattan, in the county and State of New York, have invented a new and Improved Heel for Shoes, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

This invention relates to shoes and has particular reference to an improvement in heels therefor.

The outstanding object of the present invention resides in the provision of a heel structure which greatly facilitates the application and ren'ioval of the tread lift whereby the old worn tread lift may be readily detached and replaced by a new pair by the purchaser without requiring the services of a skilled shoemaker or repair man.

The invention further contemplates a shoe heel structure including a means of connection which functions toproperly retain the tread lift in associated relation with the permanently attached lift.

As a still further object the invention contemplates a shoe heel structure which is comparatively simple in its construction, inexpensive to manufacture and which is thoroughly reliable and highly eflicient in its purpose.

lVith the above recited and other objects in view, the invention resides in the novel construction set forth in the following specification. particularly pointed out in the appended claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, itbeing understood that the right is reserved to embodiments ether than those actually illustrated herein to the full extent indicated by the general meaning of the terms in which the claims are expressed.

In the drawings Figure 1 is a 'lraginentary view of a shoe equipped with a heel structure constructed in accordance 'ith the invention. the detachable tread lift thereof lreino; illustrated in dotted lines to dem- ;nstrate the initial step in the application of the same to the permanent section.

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the detachabble tread lift section removed.

Fig. 3 is a sectional bottom plan view taken approximately on the line of Fig. 4.

bottom plan Serial No. 885,399.

Fig. at is a vertical fragmentary sectional view taken approximately on the line 4- of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken approximately on the line 5-5 of Fig. 3.

,Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a head attaching means which is associated with the detachable tread lift.

Referring tothe drawings by characters of reference, the heel structure includes a permanent lift section 10 and a detachable lift section 11, the former being preferably constructed of a light metal and the latter preferably of rubber. The section 10 is ln'ovided with suitable elements 12 for permanently anchoring the same to the heel portion of the shoe proper and further provided with an integral depending annular concentric rib 13. The rib 13 is formed at front and rear diametrically opposed points with vertically spaced pairs of internal peripheral beads '14: each of which extends approximately over a quarter of the periphery thereof and defining at opposite lateral diametrically opposed points notches 15. The confronting upper and. lower faces of each pair of beads are correspondingly inclined or cammed as at 16. The section 16' is further provided with a depending tongue 17 spaced concentrically outward from the rib 1.3. The section 11 is provided in its upper face with an annular groove 18 for the reception of the tongue 17 and is further provided with an inwardly spaced concentric socket 19 for snugly receiving the rib 13. A concentric head 20 projects upwardly from the bottom of the socket 19 and the same is formed with forwardly and rearwardly diametrically opposed segrnental cars 21 of an appropriate size to permit of their introduction through the notches when the section 11 is turned at a right angle to the section 10 and whereby upon swinging of said section 11 into alignment with the sect-ion 10 the outer periphery of the segmental cars will be snugly received between the vertically spaced pairs ofl' beads 14:. The head is preferably (onstructcd of metal and is of cylindrical formation with an open lower end having laterally projecting apertured lugs 22 whereby the member is embedded and anchored in the rubber tread lift section 11. The interengageable means for retaining the section 11, against accidental turning movement on the section 10 after the ears 21 are engaged with the beads let, consists of a pin 23 projecting downwardly from the section 10 and a socket 24 formed in the section 11. The inherent resiliency of the tread lift section 11 will normally prevent disengagement of the pin and socket 28 and 24 While the flexibility of the section 11 will permit of a flexing of the same at a point adjacent the socket to permit of intentional disengagement when it is desired to remove the section 11.

In practice when it is desired to detach the section 11 from the section 10 a portion of the section 11 adjacent the socket is lifted up to disengage the socket from the pin 23, after which the section 11 is turned at a right angle to the section 10. This disengages the cars 21 from between the beads 14: and disposes the same in Highment with the notches 15 whereby relative separation of the sectionsmay be readily accon'iplished. To apply a new tread lift section 11 the operation is reversed. It Will thus be seen that a highly eliicient heel structure having a simple and inexpensive form of detachable connection is provided for the purpose specified.

I claim:

1. A shoe heel structure comprising a permanent lift section, a detachable lift section, and interengageable means of connection therebetween, said means consisting of an annular concentric rib on the permanent lift section having internal pairs of diametrically disposed vertically spaced beads, the said detachable lift section having a concentric socket in its upper face for snugly receiving the rib, and a concentric upwardly projecting head in the socket having radially projecting diametrically disposed ears engageable between the vertically spaced pairs of beads upon relative rotary movement of the permanent and detachable lift section.

2. A shoe heel structure comprising a permanent lift section, a detachable lift section, and interengageablc means of connection therebetween, said mean consisting of an annular concentric rib on the permanent lift section having internal pairs of diametrically disposed vertically spaced beads, the said detachable lift section having a concentric socket in its upper face for snugly receiving the rib, and a concentric upwardly projecting head in the socket having radially projecting diametrically disposed. ears engageable between the vertically spaced pairs of beads upon relativerotary movement of the permanent and detachable lift section, the said internal pairs of vertically spaced beads being of semi-spiral formation to effect the impingement of the confronting faces of the permanent and detachable lift sections when relative rotary movement therebetween is set up to effect their engagement.

RICHARD R. KAMADA.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4670996 *Jul 28, 1986Jun 9, 1987Dill Mary JWomen's shoes with flexible spring steel shanks for use with replaceable heels of different height
US5560126 *Aug 17, 1994Oct 1, 1996Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5615497 *Aug 17, 1993Apr 1, 1997Meschan; David F.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5806210 *Oct 12, 1995Sep 15, 1998Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US5826352 *Sep 30, 1996Oct 27, 1998Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5918384 *Sep 30, 1996Jul 6, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5970628 *Sep 8, 1998Oct 26, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6050002 *May 18, 1999Apr 18, 2000Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6195916Feb 25, 2000Mar 6, 2001Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6324772Aug 17, 2000Dec 4, 2001Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6604300Dec 4, 2001Aug 12, 2003Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6662471Oct 18, 1999Dec 16, 2003Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6962009Jun 30, 2004Nov 8, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Bottom surface configuration for athletic shoe
US6966129Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Cushioning for athletic shoe
US6966130Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Plate for athletic shoe
US6968635Jun 30, 2004Nov 29, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe bottom
US6996923Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbing athletic shoe
US6996924Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Rear sole structure for athletic shoe
US7040040Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Midsole for athletic shoe
US7040041Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with plate
US7043857Jun 30, 2004May 16, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe having cushioning
US7069671Jun 30, 2004Jul 4, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Arch bridge for athletic shoe
US7076892Jun 30, 2004Jul 18, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbent athletic shoe
US7082700Aug 3, 2005Aug 1, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration
US7089689Aug 3, 2005Aug 15, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration and non-ground-engaging member
US7114269May 28, 2003Oct 3, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US7127835Dec 11, 2003Oct 31, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US7155843Aug 3, 2005Jan 2, 2007Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7380350Jun 30, 2004Jun 3, 2008Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with bottom opening
US7536809Dec 28, 2006May 26, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7540099Jun 30, 2004Jun 2, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Heel support for athletic shoe
US7596888Dec 12, 2008Oct 6, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Shoe with flexible plate
US8006408May 13, 2009Aug 30, 2011Nike, Inc.Impact-attenuating elements removably mounted in footwear or other products
US9078491Jan 11, 2011Jul 14, 2015Nike, Inc.Impact-attenuating elements removably mounted in footwear or other products
WO1995005099A1 *Aug 17, 1994Feb 23, 1995David F MeschanAthletic shoe with improved sole
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/36.00R
International ClassificationA43B21/50, A43B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/50
European ClassificationA43B21/50