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Publication numberUS1516473 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1924
Filing dateJun 7, 1923
Priority dateJun 7, 1923
Publication numberUS 1516473 A, US 1516473A, US-A-1516473, US1516473 A, US1516473A
InventorsMorris A Davis
Original AssigneeMorris A Davis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Interlocking building tile
US 1516473 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 18, 1924- f 1,516,473

M. A. DAVIS INTERLOCKING BUILDING TILE Filed June '7, 1923 Sheets-Sheet l Nov, 18, 1924. 1,516,473

M. A. DAVIS INTERLOCKING BUILDING TILE Filed June 7, 1923 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Nov. 18, 1924.

PATENT oEFicE- MORRIS A. DAVIS, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.

INTEIZLO'CKING BUILDING TILE.

'Appllication led June 7,

To allwhom t may concern:

Be it known that I, MORRIS A. DAVIS, a citizen of the United States, residing at Los Angeles, in the county of Los Angeles and State of California, have invented new and useful Improvements in Interlocking Building Tiles, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to interlocking building tiles, and has for its object to provide a building block or tile of hollow form and whichenables the building of a substantially hollow wall with continuous vertical apertures which are separated by continuous vertical webs, or walls forming outer and inner, plane and continuous wall faces which are adapted to be plastered over to present any desired finishing surface. An object is to provide an interlocking building block having at the top and bottom one or more square locking tenons, and the opposite `face of the block is provided with mortises or recesses complementary to the tenons of contiguous blocks. The square formation of the tenons and their mortises enable the ready and accurate poitioning of the blocks either to form a plane wall or to form right angular, intersecting walls and corners of walls.

Other objects and advantages `will be made manifest in the following specification of an embodiment of the invention illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein- Figure l is a perspective showing av p0rtion of a wall built of'the improved building blocks.

Fig. 2 is a plan showing'a fragment of a corner wall intersection. l

Fig. 3 is a. section on the plane indicated by line 3.-3 of Figure 2; on a somewhat larger scale.

Fig. 4 is a perspective looking toward the recessed end of the block.

Fig. 5 is a perspective looking toward the ribbed end of the block.

Fig. 6 is a perspective of the recessed bottom of the block.

Fig. 7 is a perspective of a half-block or bat, onel of the faces of which is provided with an interlocking rib, and

Fig. 8 is a perspective of a ribless bat.

The building block of the present invention is of the monolithic type, and is generally oblong in plan, the opposite, longitudinal faces 2 and 2n of the block being provided with recesses or channels 3, extending from top to bottom .faces 4-5. One end wall 6 1923. Serial No.` 643,927.

of the block is provided with a broad rib 7, adapted to'mortise into a recess such as is provided at 8 in the end face 9 of each block. The 'broad fa'cepockets or channels 3 are of similar contour and approximately th'esame dimensions as the tenen-like ribs 7, so that the blocks may be assembled in horizontal courses with the ends of one block abutting the recessed end of another block in the same straight course, or blocks may be abutted at right angles, with the tenon ribs 7 entering the side pockets 3 of contiguousy blocks.

This method of constructing a wall is clearly shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3.

The blocks are preferably provided' with spaced air chambers 10, which are parallel to each other and extend from the top face 4 t0 the bottom face 5, so that when the blocks are erected in superimposed courses, they will form within the wall continuous, Vertical air spaces, and in the erection of walls with the improved blocks, anyof the continuous vertical air spaces may be filled with motar which, when solidified, will form a substantially monolithic, reinforcing column from top to bottom of the-wall, or for any such height in the wall as may be desired. While the filled pockets provide for an interlocking, ,pillar-like, reinforcing means, the unfilled vertical air spaces provide an air chamber and also form, therefore, a substantially hollow wall.

The top and bottom faces of each block are adapted to be mutually interlocked when applied in substantially meeting position, and to accomplish this interlocking of the top and bottom faces, one of these faces is provided, around the air chamber-10, with a rebated or countersunk seat 11, and the opposite -top or bottom face of each block is provided with an `upwardly extending tenen-like bead 12, more or less closely conforming in shape and dimensions to its seat l1, as presented by the Vnext superimposed or subjacent block. The tenon beads 12 are adapted to match -in their respective seats 11, whether the blocks are laid inlinear courses or whether certain of the blocks are set at right vangles toI upper or lower courses, as in the throwing of corner walls or intermediate partitions.

Obviously, in corner wall structures, and also in walls having window or door openings in which the courses are laid in successively alternate position to4 break joints, there will be produced alternate spaces by the offset position of the course blocks, and these spaces are lilled with half-blocks or bats, such as are clearly shown at B in Figures 7 and 8.

These bats are of slightly different form, in accordance with their positions in the wall. The bat of Figure 7 is sho-wn as provided on one face with an interlocking rib 7 to match into the end seats provided in a contiguous block end 9. Other faces of the bat 0I Figure 7 are provided With seats 3, to receive contiguous, ribbed end blocks.

In Figure 8, the half-block or bat is shown as ribless, land has three of its faces provided with seats 3. The bats of Figures B are each provided with beads 12 at their top or bottom faces, and with bead receiving seats 11, so that they will be interlocked with the upper or lower blocks in the wall courses.

A feature of theblock of the present invention is that when they are used in walls, a contiguous stud S of a partition can be partially embedded in one of lateral or end recesses or pockets, and therefore form a substantial reinforce for the stud, as is shown in Figure 1.

Further embodments, modifications and variations may be resorted to Within the principle of the invention.

IWhat is claimed is:

1. A building block having its longitudinal side faces provided with pockets from top to bottom, one end of the block being provided with an interlocking rib and the other end with a seat to receive acontiguous rib of an adjacent block in a wall course, each of said pockets being capable of receiving said contiguous rib, interlocking, tenon-like beads upon one longitudinal face of the block, and the opposite, longitudinal face having countersunk seats to receive the tenon-like beads of a contiguous block.

2. A building block of hollow construction and having its longitudinal side faces provided with pockets from top to bottom,

f one end of the block being provided with other end with a seat to receive a contigu- 'ous rib of an adjacent hloclc in a wall ing, tenen-like beads upon one longitudinal face of the block, and the opposite, longitudinal face having counter-sunk seats to receive the tenon-like beads of a contiguous block, the block having an air chamber from top to bottom.

4. A building block having its longitudi-v nal side faces provided with pockets from top to bottom, one end of the block being provided with an interlocking rib and the other end with a seat to receive a contiguous rib of an adjacent block in a wall course, each of said pockets being capable ot' rcceiving said contiguous rib, interlocking, tenon-like beads upon one longitudinal face of the block, and the opposite, longitudinal face having countersunk seats to receive the tenen-like beads of a contiguous block, the block having a plurality of air chambers extending side by side from top to bottom and of symmetrical arrangement and form, whereby, when the blocks are laid in superimposed courses, the chambers of the blocks will register to form a continuous vertical air space.

5. In a building block having its longitudinal side faces provided with pockets from top to bottom, one end of the block being provided with an interlocking rib and the other end with a scatto receive a contiguous rib of an adjacent block in a wall course, each of said pockets being capable of receiving said contiguous rib, interlocking, tenon-like beads upon one longitudinal face of the block, and the opposite, longitudinal face having countersunk seats to receive the tenon-like beads of a contiguous block, the said beads being ot' square contour in plan, whereby the blocks may be laid in superimposed, linear courses and may be laid in right angular' Walls or partitions intersecting each other and interlocked in such positions.

6. A building block having its longitudinal side faces provided with pockets from top to bottom, one end of the block being provided with an interlocking rib and the other end with a seat to receive av contiguous rib of an adjacent block in a wall course, interlocking, tenon-like beads upon onelongitudinal face of the block, and the opposite, longitudinal face having countersunk seats to receive the tenon-like beads of a contiguous block, all of the pockets and recesses of a block being adapted to receive a tenon-like projection of another block so as to interlock in one position therewith.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to .this specification.

MORRIS A. DAVIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2635450 *May 20, 1948Apr 21, 1953Agnes W OrzelBuilding construction and slab therefor
US4651485 *Sep 11, 1985Mar 24, 1987Osborne Ronald PInterlocking building block system
US4854103 *Nov 12, 1987Aug 8, 1989Kyle KlymBuilding system with interlocking blocks
US5457926 *Nov 3, 1993Oct 17, 1995Templeton TrustInterlocking block
US6948282 *Apr 17, 2003Sep 27, 2005Allan Block CorporationInterlocking building block
US7712281Apr 6, 2005May 11, 2010Allan Block CorporationInterlocking building block
US7823360May 24, 2007Nov 2, 2010Jared CottleOpen core building blocks system
US9410313 *Oct 6, 2014Aug 9, 2016Gary SummersBuilding block system
US20040134154 *Apr 17, 2003Jul 15, 2004Allan Block CorporationInterlocking building block
DE4419652A1 *Jun 4, 1994Dec 7, 1995Meckenstock H W KgPlate=shaped element for light component mfr.
DE9409126U1 *Jun 4, 1994Oct 6, 1994Meckenstock H W KgFormbauteil
DE9409127U1 *Jun 4, 1994Oct 6, 1994Meckenstock H W KgFormbauteil
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/592.1, 52/206, 52/281
International ClassificationE04B2/02, E04B2/14
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2002/0295, E04B2/14
European ClassificationE04B2/14