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Publication numberUS1517238 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 25, 1924
Filing dateDec 8, 1922
Priority dateDec 8, 1922
Publication numberUS 1517238 A, US 1517238A, US-A-1517238, US1517238 A, US1517238A
InventorsRichard Stresau
Original AssigneeSmith Corp A O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of connecting metal parts by electric welding
US 1517238 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 25 1924. 1,517,238 v R. STRESAU PROCESS OF CONNECTING METAL PARTS BY ELECTRIC WELDING Filed Dec. 8, 1922 INVENTOR.

fiat/lard 677 Esau,

BY W Y I A TTORNEYS.

Patented Nov. 25, 1924.

UNITED STATES.

1,515,238 PATENT OFFICE.

RICHARDSTRESAU, OF WAUWATOSA, WISCONSIN, ASSIGNOR TO A. 0. SMITH COR- FORATION, OF MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

PROCESS OF CONNECTING METAL PARTS BY ELECTRIC WELDING.

Application filed December 8, 1922. Serial No. 605,589.

To all whom it may concern.

Be it known that I, RICHARD STRnsAU, a citizen of the United States, and a resident v of the city of Wauwatosa, county of Milwaukee, and State of Wisconsin, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Processes of Connecting Metal Parts by Electric \Velding; and I do declare the following to be a clear, exact, and complete description thereof, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which my invention relates to make and use the same, reference being bad to the accompanying drawing as illustrative of a practicable construction in which my/invention has been embodied.

The invention resides in an improved method of electric welding, specifically applicable to the production of automobile or other vehicle frames.

Automobile frames are now generally constructed of two sheet steel members pressed into the shape of channels to form longitudinally extending side bars, the latter being united by a plurality of cross bars, the ends of which are rigidly attached to the side bars to constitute a permanent structure.

In the older construction of such frames, the cross bars were generally formed as pressed steel channel members to which the side bars were attached, by means of flanges at their ends. Later, it was found that a greatly increased degree of rigidity was imparted to the frame by the use of tubular cross bars, which by reason of their torsional resistance served to fortify the frame against vibration, and prevent its racking under strains to which it might be subjected, the latter being injurious to the body or structure supported upon the frame.

The problem of securely attaching the ends of thetubular cross bars to the longitudinal side bars of the frame presented some difiiculty, and especially so in that type of frame, now in common use, in which the side bars extend in planes which converge at their forward ends. The arrangement of the side bars in this converging line frame, as described, has heretofore necessitated the performance of difficult op erations in cutting both of the ends of the tubular cross bar at an angle in exact coincidence with the longitudinal arrangement of the side bars, such angle departing from perpendicularity with relation to the axis of the tubular cross bar. Upon the endsof the tubular cross bars thus formed, connecting plates were fixed so as to stand at an angle parallel to the vertical and longitudinal planes of the side bars, and such plates were attached to the side bars by arc welding or otherwise, to complete the frame structure.

The requirements to be met in the situation described were such that considerable time was necessarily consumed in the achievement of the purposes desired.

I have found that the operations in making such a cross bar may be greatly simplified, and the cost of production materially reduced, by forming the connecting.

plates referred to with a spherical embossment or projection. upon which the square.

cut end of the tubular cross bar is adapted to be seated." This provision enables the tubular cross bars to be formed much more readily with square cut ends, and it follows that the connecting plates may be placed at any desired angle with reference to the axis of the tubular cross bars, it being necessary only to first determine the angle which the cross bars are to bear to the side bars. The end plates and the tubular cross bars. assembled in the angular relation desired, are joined by welding circumferentially about the line of contact of the tubular members and the embossments. This welding is performed most expeditiously and efficiently by employing an electric arc.

The features of the invention will now be described with. particularity, and the novelty thereof will be pointedout in the appended claims. 7

' In the accompanying drawing:

Figure 1 is aplan view of an automobile frame, the side bars of which converge forwardly, and are joined together by a plu-' the convergence described. relat on to produce a tapering or stream-' Fig. 2 is a plan view of oneof the tubular torsion resisting cross bars, the latter being partly in section, and showing the arrangement of the spherical embossed plates as applied in position to the ends thereof, and

' about the joint, but I indicating also the circumferential line of welding by means of which such plates are permanently united to the cross bars.

Referring to the drawing, the numerals 10 and 11 indicate the usual pressed steel channeled side bars of an automobile frame. The cross bars formedas tubular members, and indicated by the numeral 12, are graduated in length and are arranged between the side bars so as to produce the convergence of the side bars at their forward ends, the longest cross bar being located at the rear end of the frame.

The plates which serve to connect the ends of the cross bars to the side bars are indicated 13, and are provided with spherical embossments or other enlargements or projections 14, the latter being designed to enter the ends of the tubular cross bars. It will be obvious that the spherical surface of the embossment may readily be made to partially enter within the end of the tubular cross bar, and that the squared end of the latter.

will seat itself in position upon the spherical surface, so that the plate 13 may be made to stand at any desired angle with relation to the axis of the cross bar.

In assembling the tubular member and the connecting plates, it is necessary only to arrange the two plates 13 in planes co inciding with those in which the side bars extend. The cross bars are placed in position with their ends encircling the embossments. The parts are then welded along the line of contact of the tubular member with the embossment, as indicated at 15in Fig. 2.

The welding is easily accomplished. I havefound that the welding may be achieved by clamping the two plates 13 in chucks whichwill press the embossments into engagement with the ends of the tubular cross bar, and rotate the assembled parts past the point of a weldrod. The results desired may be obtained expeditiously by the use of a current conducting fusible weldrod, the molten metal flowing from which is deposited at the welding line so as to supply an additional amount of metal at the joint and reinforce the union due to, the fusion which takes place in the parts to be united. The

assembled parts may be rotated a suflicient number of times to permit the formation of the deposit of metal necessary to fill the exterior opening 16 existing in the line of contact of the embossment with the end of the tubular member, and produce a symmetrical ]O1I1i Conversel the assembled parts may be held stationary and the weld'rod rotated find the method first described to be preferable, inasmuch as it is productive of the most and is the easier to operate.

The frame will be completed by assembllng the Side bars with the cross bars propsatisfactory results,

erly positioned with respect thereto, and attaching the plates which have been ncorporated into the integral cross bar construc tions to the side bars to form a permanent frame structure. The attachment may be efl'ctedvery satisfactorily by arc welding, but other means of achieving the result may be employed.

It is not necessary to the successful practice of my invention that the embossment on the connecting plate be invariably spherical, inasmuch as other forms of enlargement or projection may be used, having in mind the attainment of the purposes of the present invention, which are to enable use to be made of the idea of attaching the squared ends of tubular cross bars to the connecting plates, regardless of the angle at which they stand in relation to the axis ofthe "cross bar. The angle necessarily varies from normality to the axis when tapering frames are being produced.

.It is obviously within the scope of my invention to'fuse and weld the parts by fineans other than the electric arc, as hereinbefore described.

The manufacture herein disclosed is the subject-matter of the claims of an application filed by me on October 16, 1924, Serial No. 743,912, as a division of the present application. c

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to obtain by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. The process of connecting metal parts by electric welding which comprises the steps of forming one of such parts with a spherical embossmentand the other as a tubular member adapted to be seated upon the said embossment, and permanently connectingthe said partsby welding circumferentially at the line of contact of the parts. l.

2.' The process of connecting metal parts by electric welding which comprises the steps of forming one of such parts with a spherical embossment and the other as a tubular member with a square cut end adapted to be seated upon the said embossment, and permanently connecting the said parts by arc welding circumferentially at the line ofcontact of the parts.

3. The process of connecting metal parts which consists in arranging the ends of a tubular member in engagement with spherical embossments formed upon metal plates standing in planes which are convergent angularly with relation to the axis of the tubular member, and fusing the parts by means of an electric current-to weld them into an integral structure.

4. The process of connecting metal parts which consists in arranging the ends, of a tubular member in engagement with sphe rstanding in planes which are convergent angularly with relation to the axis of the tubular member, and conducting an electric current by means of a fusible weldrod to fuse the parts and deposit the metal flowing from the weldrod upon the joint to constitute an integral structure. v v 5 The process of connecting metal parts at variant angles which consists in providing one of such parts with a spherical embossment and the other as a tubular memher with a square cut end adapted to be seated upon the embossment to produce the desired angle in the relation of the parts, and joining the said parts by the fusion of the same in the line of their contact to produce an integral structure.

6. The method of forming a torsional R. STRESAU.

Witnesses \V. I. 'wmno,

ELizAnE'rH MURRAY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2886344 *Oct 10, 1955May 12, 1959BeachTow bar
US4813591 *Apr 4, 1988Mar 21, 1989Schwinn Bicycle CompanyMethod of fabricating a rear fork assembly for a bicycle and drop out bracket therefor
US6000719 *Apr 28, 1997Dec 14, 1999The Budd CompanyBody bracket and welding technique
US6408515 *Aug 20, 1998Jun 25, 2002Dana CorporationMethod for manufacturing an engine cradle for a vehicle frame assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/137.00R, 29/897.2, 280/800
International ClassificationB23K33/00
Cooperative ClassificationB23K33/006
European ClassificationB23K33/00B2