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Publication numberUS1518961 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 9, 1924
Filing dateMar 1, 1924
Publication numberUS 1518961 A, US 1518961A, US-A-1518961, US1518961 A, US1518961A
InventorsSamuel H. Burns
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Crochet hook and holder
US 1518961 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec, 9, 1924.

S. H. BURNS CROCHET HOOK AND HOLDER Filed March 1, 1924 Inventor fiamwe/ [If Bur/a6 B y M Md M [11 3 Aflozneys Patented Dec. 9, 1924.

UNITED STATES SAMUEL H. BURNS, OIE BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

CROCHET HOOK AND HOLDER.

Application filed March 1, 192d.

. To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, SAMUEL H. BURNs, a citizen of the United States, and resident of Brooklyn, in the county of Kings and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Crochet Hooks and Holders, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to separable crochet hooks and the like and holders therefor, and more particularly to the type in which the needle can be reversed and left with the point inside the holder for protection when not in use.

This application is a continuation in part of my application Serial No. 565,818, filed June 5, 1929..

The main object of my invention is to provide a simple form of construction giving increased convenience both when in use and when being carried. My invention has the further object of providing a device which can be adaptedto any kind of crochet work.

In the accompanying drawings Fig. 1 is a sectional plan of the complete device ready for use;

Fig. 2 is a plan view with the needle in protected position;

Fig. 3 shows the various parts disassembled;

Fig. 4 is a cross section on line l-4: of Fig. 1 showing one shape of clamping aws; and

Fig. 5 is a sectional view of a modified form of my device.

Crochet needles with separable hooks and holders are old in the art, but such a construction as well as the solid hook and holder has had its disadvantages. My con struction embraces all the advantages of each type, without the disadvantages, and is a practical and ornamental device.

I provide a hollow handle 1 adapted to receive a hook 2 through a small opening 3 in a tapered end 4 of the handle. Inside the main portion of the hollow handle I have a snugly fitting inner shell 5 which has a few turns of screw threads 6 at its upper end, these screw threads being adapted to engage similar threads on the inside of the hollow handle 1. A small tube 7 is revolubly fastened at the lower end of the inner shell 5 in any suitable manner though I prefer to burr the end of the tube over inside the shell and to hold the tube on the outside of the shell by squeezing it just at that Serial No. 698,369;

point. To give a better bearing surface than would be obtained from the edges of this flattened portion, I put a ring 8 around the tube between the flattened portion and the shell. The lower end of the tube 7 is split lengthwise forming jaws 10 and is of such a length that when the shell 5 is screwed into the handle the split end is jammed into the opening 3 of the handle.

In using a crochet needle it is very desirable that the needle have a flattened portion which can be gripped by the thumb and forefinger of the operator, and for this purpose I provide the flattened portion 4 at the tapered lower end at the handle 1. In conjunction with this I prefer to make the shank portion of the hook and the opening 3 in which the needle should fit snugly, of v some non-round cross section, so that the book can not revolve when its shank is in the opening 3. By these means I maintain a fixed rotational relation between the needle and the flattened portion 1 of the handle as is necessary for the convenience of the operator. When it is desired to clamp a needle 2 in the holder, the inner shell 5 is partially withdrawn from the outer shell 1 by being turned in the screw threads of the outer handle. Since the tube 7 need not revolve with the inner shell 5 it follows that the jaws 10 forming the split end of the tube 7 are withdrawn into the tapered end without revolving. The shank of the hook is then introduced into opening 3 of the tapered end and the aws 10 until the desired length of the shank is left outside the holder when the inner shell 5 can be screwed into the outer shell and the clamping aws 10 forced into the opening 3 of the tapered end thus gripping the shank of the hook.

The like process is employed when it is desired to put the hook in the protected position by inserting the point of the needle between the clamping jaws 10. By making the inner shell 5 hollow, and of the proper length, I can use it as a reservoir for an assortment of needles for various sizes and kinds of crochet work and by this means my device is made adaptable for any kind of crochet work. In Fig. 5 is shown a modified form of the threaded means inside the outer shell. In this form the threads 6 are eliminated and a short threaded stick 12 introduced between the inner tube 5 and the small tube 7. This stick 12 is fastened tightly to the tube 5 in any suitable way but the tube 7 is of course revolublc with relation thereto. In the particular form of the modification shown in Fig. 5 the stick 12 is smaller than the outer shell and I therefore fasten a threaded sleeve 13 inside the tube by rolling grooves on the outside of the tube at the point where it is fastened.

It might also be noted that the length of the hook can be varied to suit the nature of the work or the desire of the operator by varying the point on the shank at which the clamping jaws are fastened.

I have found that it is an added convenience if the cap 11 on the upper end of the holder is made to fit the inner shell 5 snugly, and thus afford a means of turning the inner shell and at the same time have a skirt 14 overlapping the outer shell and forming a convenient cover for the hollow end.

I claim 1. A. crochet hook and holder comprising a hook and an outer shell having a flattened end tapering to an opening adapted to admit the shank of said hook, in combination with means covered by said outer shell cooperating with said flattened end to grip the shank of said hook.

2. A crochet hook and holder comprising a hook and an outer shell having a flattened end tapering to an opening just large enough to admit any part of said hook, in combina tion with means covered by said outer shell cooperating with said flattened end to grip the shank of said hook.

3. 1 a crochet hook and holder comprising a hook and outer shell having a flattened end tapering to an opening adapted to admit the shank of said hook and prevent rotation of said shank therein, in combination with means covered by said outer shell cooperating with said flattened end to grip the shank of said hook.

4. A crochet hook and holder comprising a hook in combination with an outer shell having a flattened end tapering to an opening adapted to receive the shank of said hook, and means covered by said outer shell cooperating with said flattened end to grip the shank of said hook and prevent its rotation.

5. A crochet hook and holder comprising a hook having a non-round shank, clamping jaws adapted to receive said hook, a thread ed stick re'volubly fastened to said clamping jaws and an inner tube fastened to said stick, together with an outer shell covering said jaws, stick and inner tube, a sleeve unitary with said outer shell and threaded on said stick, said outer shell having a flattened end tapering to an opening adapted to cooperate with said jaws in gripping said shank and preventing its rotation.

6. In a holder for a crochet hook having a non-round shank, clamping jaws adapted to receive said hook, threaded means fastened to said clamping jaws adapted to move said jaws longitudinally without revolving them, and operating means for said threaded means, in combination with an outer shell covering said jaws and having a flattened end tapering to an opening adapt ed to cooperate with said jaws in gripping the shank of the needle and preventing its rotation.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification.

SAMUEL H. BURNS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2465636 *Jul 23, 1946Mar 29, 1949 Crochet hook
US2491702 *Oct 21, 1947Dec 20, 1949Arnold Ivan WFly-tying finisher
US3228212 *Feb 8, 1962Jan 11, 1966Huber AngelaMethod of hand knitting and knitting needle
US7874181 *Jan 28, 2009Jan 25, 2011Sandra Kay LindahlKnitting needle with ergonomic configuration
US7874182 *Jan 28, 2009Jan 25, 2011Sandra Kay LindahlCrochet hook with ergonomic configuration
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/118
Cooperative ClassificationD04B3/00