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Publication numberUS1520624 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1924
Filing dateMar 8, 1923
Priority dateMar 8, 1923
Publication numberUS 1520624 A, US 1520624A, US-A-1520624, US1520624 A, US1520624A
InventorsWiederwax Robert W
Original AssigneeGeist Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of burning liquid fuels
US 1520624 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec 23,

R. w. WIEDERWAX PROCESS OF'BURNING LIQUID FUELS Filed March 8, 1923 2 Sheets-Sheet l R. w. WIEDERWAX .PROGESS OF BURNING LIQUID FUELS Filed March 8, 1923 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 J mm u hm MmI 'M 1 I1: 11.1. i

Zlwuamfoz Patented Dec. 23, 1924-,

ROBERT W. WIELDERWAX, OF ATLANTIC CITY,

NEW" JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO GEIST MANUFACTURING COMPANY, OF ATLANTIC CITY, NEW JERSEY, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE.

PROCESS OF BURNING LIQUID FUELS.

Application filed March 8, 1923.

To all QUIZ-0771' it may concern:

Be it known that 1, ROBERT /VAL'roN iVIEoERwAx, a citizen of the United States, residing at Atlantic City, in the county of Atlantic and State of New Jersey, have invented certain new and useful improvements in Processes of Burning Liquid Fuels. of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to processes of burning liquid fuels, such as kerosene, gas oil, and the still heavier fractions of petroleum, which as commonly burned for heating boilers, melting metais, and the like, produce carbonaceous particles whose presence in the products of combustion render the use of such fuels unsatisfactory for some purposes. Aside from the loss in efficiency due to the fact that the combined carbon. in the liquid fuel is not wholly consumed, the presence of carbonaceous particles in the products of combustion is disadvantageous by reason of the smoke produced, and it is particularly disadvantageous in heating and melting furnaces of the type wherein the products of combustion come into direct contact with the material to be heated or melted as, for example, in melting glass or maintaining it in molten condition.

This application is a continuation, in part, of my co-pending application relating to process of burning liquid fuels, filed November 2, 1922 Serial No. 598,693.

So far as I am aware, prior to my invention, there was no method of or apparatus for so burning liquid fuels of the character above referred to for industrial purposes, as in furnaces or the like, that the products of combustion are substantially free from car bonaceous particles.

Now I have discovered a method of so burning liquid hydrocarbons and particu- .larly the less volatile petroleum fractions obtainable at a relatively low cost, that their fuel value is more eiiiciently utilized than in methods and apparatus heretofore used and the products of combustion are not only substantially free from the presence of carbonaceous particles, but so almost entirely free from unconsumed carbonaceous particles that, for the first time in the history of the art, such products of combustion may be used for melting glass or maintaining it in molten condition by contact therewith, without injury to the glass,

Serial No. 623,724.

In my process, the oil is first heated to a point somewhat, and preferably, just below its point of vaporization under the pressure to which it is exposed, and is then suddenly heated to a point above its point of vaporization, and in the preferred practice of my invention, to a point greatly above its point of vaporization under the conditions present, whereby it is partially or completely flashed or rapidly transformed into an aeri form condition, and then mixed with some aeriform fluid, such as superheated steam or highl heated air, adapted to complete the transformation of the fuel into an aeriform condition and to facilitate or support the combustion of the vaporized fuel. The mixture is then burned in free contact with the air, preferably in the form of a rapidly moving current or jet issuing from a suitable pipe or nozzle by means of which the flame produced may be directed to the point at which the heat of the burning fuel is to be utilized.

In the preferred practice of my invention, the fuel when first heated to a point somewhat below its point of vaporization is maintained under pressure so that its point of vaporization is above its point of vaporization at atmospheric pressure. This preheated liquid is then suddenly heated to a temperature above the point of the Vaporization of the fuel under the conditions present.

I prefer to effect the rise in temperature to suddenly and completely transform the fuel into aeriform condition by contacting it with a highly heated surface and mixing it with some aeriforn'i fluid as superheated steam or highly heated air. To facilitate rapid vaporization or flashing of the preheated liquid fuel into aeriform condition, I prefer to contact it with the highly heated surface and mix it with some aeriform fluid as superheated steam or highly heated air under conditions permitting of its rapid expansion, as in-an expansion chamber. The rapid expansion of the fuel at the instant of contacting it with the highly heated surface and of mixing it with some aeriform fluid as superheated steam or highly heated air will facilitate the fuel attaining a form in which it will burn without the production of unconsumed carbonaceous particles.

in the accc npanying drawings, I have Referring to the drawings, the reference numeral 1 designates a furnace wall. This wall is provided with an opening for the re ception of a burner casing and the burner casing is arranged therein in the usual manner. The burner casing consists of an inner cylindrical member 2, having a flange 3 formed on it forward end. A cylindrical member 4 is arranged at the front end of the casing and spaced therefrom, forming a chamber 5 for heating air, steam or other fluid to be employed in vaporizing and burning the fuel. The rear portion of the burner casing is surrounded by another cylindrical member 6 which is spaced therefrom, forming a preheating chamber 7. The adjacent ends of the cylindrical members 4, and 6 are provided with flanges 8 and 9, forming end walls which are secured to the casing in any suitable manner, as by welding. The rear of the cylindrical member 6 is provided with an inclined portion 10 and a portion 11 contacting with the burner casing. This rear portion may be secured to the burner casing in any suitable manner, to form a gastight chamber.

Air, steam or other fluid, is delivered to the heating chamber 5 through. a. pipe 12, and highly heated air. superheated steam or other fluid is fed therefrom through a pipe 13. Oil is delivered to the preheating chamber through a pipe 1A and the heated oil is conveyed therefrom through. a pipe 15. A burner pipe 16 is arranged within the burner casing. This burner pipe is of greater diameter than the feed pipes 13 and 15. and is connected to a pipe 17 of substantially the same diameter as the feed pipes, by means of a fitting 18. A valve casing 19 is arranged at the rear of the pipe 17. having a valve 20 therein, controlled by a handle 21. As shown, the fluid pipe 13 communicates with this valve casing. A fitting 22 is arranged in the adjacent end of the pipe 17 and this fitting is provided with an opening for the reception of a pipe 23 of smaller diameter through which air. steam or other fluid is adapted to pass. As shown, the forward end of this pipe is reduced. as at 24, and is provided with a relatively small outlet opening.

The oil pipe 15 is connected to a valve casing 25 having a valve therein (not shown) controlled by a valve handle 26. The opposite end of the valve casing is connected to a rearwardly inclined pipe 27 forming a part of the fitting 18. This pipe is provided with a relatively small opening 28, leading into the fitting to permit communication between the oil pipe and the burner'pipe. A nozzle 29 is arranged on the forward end of the burner pipe, being secured thereto by a fitting 30.

The flame from the nozzle 29 is projected into the fire box of the furnace and the heat therein is sufflcient to heat the forward end and inner surface of the tube 2 to a very high temperature.

In the preferred practice of my process, steam or air is delivered to the heating chamber 5 through pipe 12, and oil under pressure is delivered to the preheating chamber 7, through pipe 14. The steam delivered to the heating chamber, when steam is employed in the fuel mixture, is superheated to such a. temperature that it eXpandsmaterially in volume. Its temperature is ordinarily around 700 F. The air delivered to the heating chamber, when air is employed in the fuel mixture, may be heated to a much higher temperature than when steam is employed. The oil is heated to a relatively high temperature in the preheating chamber but is not vaporized. At the pressure employed in practicing the process, the

till

oil. is preferably heated to a point just below vaporization. The superheated steam or highly heated air is delivered through pipe 13 to the inner pipe 23 and thence to the burner pipe 16. Oil passing through pipe 15 is delivered through the opening 28 against the highly heated surface of the pipe 23. When the oil enters the burner pipe, which is of greater diameter than the pipe 15. it tends to vaporize. This tendency is materially increased by contact with the hot surface of the pipe 23 and by mixing with the superheated steam or highly heated air issuing from pipe 23, and complete vaporization or gasification takes place almost instantly.

While I have described in detail the preferred practice of my process, itis to be understood that the details of procedure may be widely varied without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the subjoined claims.

Having described my invention, claim is:

1. The herein described process which comprises preheating the fuel to a tempera-- ture below its point of vaporization. delivering it to a burner pipe. then suddenly heating it in said burner pipe to a temperature above its point of vaporization, mixing such fuel in said burner pipe with an aeriformfluid adapted to coact therewith in the vaporizing of such fuel, whereby the fuel is rapidly transformed into aeriform condir tion, and burning the fuel.

wh at I hill till

The herein described process which comprises preheating the fuel to a point slightly below its point of vaporization, then heating it to a temperature materially above its point of varmrization. mixing the fuel with an aeriform fluid adapted to coact therewith in the vaporizing of such fuel. whereby the fuel is rapidly transformed into aeriform condition. and burning the fuel.

3. The herein 'lescribed process which comprises preheating the fuel to a temperature slightly below its point of vaporization, delivering it to a burner pipe, then rapidly heating it in said burner pipe to a point above its point of vaporization, mixing the fuel in said burner pipe with a highly heated aeriform fluid adapted to coact therewith in the vaporizing of such fuel, whereby the fuel is transformed into aeriform condition. and burning the fuel.

-'L. The herein described process which comprises preheating the fuel to a temperature below its point of vaporization, then suddenly heating it to a temperature above its point of vaporization. mixing the fuel with a rapidly moving current of a heated aeriform fluid adapted to coact therewith in the vaporization of such fuel, whereby the fuel is rapidly transformed into aeriform condition, directing the resulting stream to a point where the heat of the fuel is to be utilized, and burning the fuel.

The herein described process which comprises preheating the fuel under pressure to a temperature below its point of vaporization, diminishing the pressure and immediately rapidly increasing the temperature of the fuel to a point above the point of vaporization, mixing the fuel with an aeriforn'i fluid adapted to coact. therewith in the vaporization of such fuel, whereby the fuel rapidly transformed into aeriform condition and burning the fuel.

6. The herein described process which comprises preheating the fuel under pressure to a point below its point of vaporization, then diminishing the pressure and immediately rapidly heating the preheated fuel to a temperature above its point of vaporization, mixing the fuel with a high- 1y heated aeriform fluid adapted to coact therewith in the vaporization of such fuel, whereby the fuel is rapidly transformed into aeriform condition, and burning the fuel.

7. The herein described process which comprises preheating the fuel to a temperature below its point of vaporization, delivering it to a burner pipe, then contacting said preheated fuel with a highly heated surface in said burner pi 3e, mixing the fuel in said burner pipe with a heated aeriforni fluid adapted to coact therewith in the vaporization of such fuel, whereby the fuel is transformed into an aeriform condition, and burning the fuel.

8. The herein described process which comprises preheating the fuel under pressure to a temperature below its vaporizing temperature, delivering said fuel to a chamber of such capacity whereby its pressure is reduced. contacting the preheat ed fuel with a highly heated surface in said chamber, mixing said fuel in said chamber with a highly heated aeriform fluid adapted to coact therewith in vaporizing, whereby the fuel is rapidly transformed into aeriform condition, and burning the fuel.

9. The herein described process which comprises preheating the fuel under pres sure to a temperature slightly below its vaporizing point delivering it to a burner pipe. then delivering said preheated fuel into contact with a highly heated surface in said burner pipe, mixing said fuel in said burner pipe with a rapidly moving stream of a highly heated aeriform fluid adapted to coact therewith in the vaporization of such fuel, whereby it is transformed into an aeriform condition, and burning the fuel.

10. The herein described process which comprises bringing a body of preheated liquid fuel under pressure into contact with a highly heated surface in a burner pipe to heat said fuel to a temperature above its point of vaporization, mixing said fuel in said burner pipe with a rapidly moving stream of highly heated aeriform fluid whereby it is transformed into aeriform condition, directing the mixture to a point where the heat of the fuel is to be utilized. and burning the fuel. I

11. The herein described process which comprises passing a body of preheated liquid fuel under pressure into an expansion chamber to effect a reduction of pressure and irmnediately causing said fuel to contact with a highly heated surface to heat it to a temperature above its point of vaporization, then mixing said fuel with a highly heated aeriform fluid adapted to coac t therewith in the vaporization and combustion of the fuel, and burning said fuel.

12. The herein described process which comprises bringing a body of preheated liquid fuel under pressure into contact with a highly heated surface to heat it above its point of vaporization, then mixing said fuel with a rapidly moving stream of superheated steam or highly heated air, and burning the fuel.

13. The herein described process which comprises passing fuel under pressure through a preheating chamber surrounding a burner pipe to heat said fuel to a temperature just below its point of vaporization, passing steam or air through a heating chamber surrounding said burner pipe to superheat it, delivering the superheated steam or highly heated air to said pipe arranged within a burner pipe, delivering said preheated fuel into said burner pipe around said superheated steam or highly heated air pipe, whereby said fuel will contact with said highly heated superheated steam or air pipe, then mixing the fuel and superheated steam or highly heated air in said burner pipe, whereby the fuel is transformed into aeriform condition, and burning the fuel.

141;. The herein described process which comprises delivering a body of preheated liquid fuel into a burner pipe, contacting said oil in said burner pipe with a highly heated surface to heat it above its point of vaporization, then mixing said fuel in said burner pipe with a rapidly moving stream of superheated steam or highly heated air, and burning said fuel.

In. testimony whereof I affix my sig nature.

ROBERT WV. WIEDERVVAX.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3597134 *Jan 23, 1969Aug 3, 1971Bailey Frank WLiquid fuel burning apparatus
US4067682 *Aug 1, 1975Jan 10, 1978Nichols Engineering & Research CorporationOil burner system
US4289475 *Jan 5, 1977Sep 15, 1981Selas Corporation Of AmericaSteam vaporization of oil
US4302177 *Jun 5, 1978Nov 24, 1981The M. W. Kellogg CompanyFuel conversion apparatus and method
US4544350 *Oct 27, 1982Oct 1, 1985Vista Chemical CompanyBurner apparatus for simultaneously incinerating liquid, dry gas and wet gas streams
US5022851 *Jun 23, 1988Jun 11, 1991J. EberspacherFuel pre-heater for liquid fueled engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/11, 431/217
International ClassificationF23C99/00
Cooperative ClassificationF23C99/00, F23C2700/026
European ClassificationF23C99/00