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Publication numberUS1522708 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 13, 1925
Filing dateJan 9, 1922
Priority dateJan 9, 1922
Publication numberUS 1522708 A, US 1522708A, US-A-1522708, US1522708 A, US1522708A
InventorsAndrews Bernard R
Original AssigneeAndrews Bernard R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat-insulating-wall construction
US 1522708 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. R. ANDREWS HEAT INSULATINQ WALL CONSTRUCTION Filed Jan. 9. 1922 Fig.1. \5

lnvenTor.

Bernard H. Andrews b SZM&M Anya.

1,522,708 PATENT OFFICE.

3mm B. ANDREWS, OI: 'BRAINTBEE, MASSACHUSETTS.

HIBAT-INBUIiATING-WALL CONSTRUCTION.

Application tiled January 8, 1822. Berta] No. 527,816.

To all whom it may comm:

Be it known that I, BERNARD 1t. AN- mmws, a citizen of the United States, and resident of Braintree, county of Norfolk, State of Massachusetts, have invented an Improvement in Heat-Insulatin -Wall Constructions, of which the following descrip tion, in connection with the accompanying drawin is a specification, like characters on the rawing representing like parts.

This invent on relates to walls for buildings and rooms of the type which are designed to resist the passage through them of heat.

Walls of this type are used in various buildings where it is necessary to maintain within the building or room a temperature either considerably higher or lower than that of the atmos here.

One use to whic walls of this nature may be put is in the building of dry houses or dry rooms wherein it is necessary to maintam a relatively high temperature to perform the drying operation. Such walls are also used in refrigerating rooms or buildings where it is desirable to maintain within the room or building a temperature considerably lower than the outside temperature.

It is the object of my present invention to provide a novel heat insulating wall which is simple in construction and inexpensive to manufacture, and which is extremely efiicient in preventing the passage of heat therethrough.

In carrying out my invention I make use of the fact that sheet metal having a bright reflecting surface will radiate or transmit or give off heat to the atmosphere very slowly, and in the preferred embodiment of the invention I build the wall with a supporting portion, which may conveniently be of wood, and employ one or more layers of sheet metal having a bright, surface which line the wall but are spaced therefrom thereby providing an air space between the sheet metal and the supporting portion. This air space constitutes. a good insulation against heat and the presence of the bri ht sheet metal surfaces make a wall which as extremely good heat insulating properties.

My invention also contemplates the provision of a panel construction suitable for use in a wall of this type, such panel being formed with two separated sides each hav ing a bright surface and enclosing an air space so that the panel involves an air space enclosed b bright reflecting surfaces. Panels of t is construction can be readily manufactured in a factory and then shipped to the place where the wall is to be erected and there assembled.

In order to give an understanding of the invention I have illustrated in the drawings a selected embodiment of the invention which will now be described after which the novel features will be pointed out in the appended claims.

Fig. l is a side view of a wall embodying my invention with a portion broken out.

Fig. 2 is a section on the line 22, Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged perspective view of one of the sheet metal panels.

In the wall herein shown 1 indicates the supporting portion which may conveniently made of wood, and one convenient way of building this part of the wall is to erect suitable studding 2 on which the boards 3 are sustained. If it is desirable to place the boards 3 vertically then I propose to use cross members 4 between the studding, thus producing a sort of panelled structure as best seen in Fig. 1. The boards 3 may then be nailed to the cross members 4.

The wall also embodies a lining made of sheet metal having a bright surface and this lining may conveniently be secured to the studding 2 and cross members 4. One convenient wa of making this lining is to build it in,the form of panels 15 which are of a size to fill the space enclosed by two ad- Lacent studs 2 and two adjacent cross memers 4.

I will preferably make each panel with two sides separated from each other, each of the sides being of sheet metal having bright surfaces.

One way of makin these panels would be to take a piece 0 sheet metal of that charabter, such for instance as sheet tin, which as it is manufactured presents a relatively bright and smooth reflectin surface. A lece of sheet metal of this 0 aracter can t en be operated on b a die or otherwise so that one portion tiereof will be u set as shown at 6 and then the sheet may be folded back on itself as for instance along the line 5. This will make a panel comprisin the two sections 7 and 8, the section 7 being plain and the section 8 being upset as shown at 6. Such a panel will also have the peripheral flange 10 and the two sections 7 and 8 will be separated from each other to the extent of the depth of the shoulder 6. Such a panel will have a or thin portion 6 entirely surrounding it and the space 13 between the walls 7 and 8 will form a dead air space, the sides of which are formed of bright reflecting surfaces.

Panels made in this way can conveniently be secured in place by nailing them to the studding and cross ieces 4 by means of suitable nails 11, it ing understood that the flange 10 of each panel will be provided with nail holes 12 through which the nails may be driven. Where the panels are made of a size to fit the spaces enclosed by the studding 2 and cross pieces 4 the separate panel sections can be quickly and rapidly put in place after the body portion of the wall has been erected.

Owing to the bright surfaces of the walls 7 and 8 each section will transmit heat to the air relatively slowly and as a result the amount of heat which is transmitted in a given time through a wall such as herein illustrated is extremely small.

If the wall is used in a dry house or dry room I will preferably place the portion of the wall having a sheet metal lining on the interior of the house or, room. In this case the temperature on the metal-lined side of the wall is higher than that on the opposite side. The bright surface of the inner face of the section 7 of the wall prevents to a large extent the transmission of heat from the wall 7 into the space 13 between the sections 7 and 8, and the bright surface of the outside face of the section 8 prevents to a large extent the transmission of any heat from the space 13 to the space 14 between the wall sectlons 8 and the wooden-supporting portion 1. This wooden supporting portlon also has a certain degree of heat insulation so that the total amount of heat which is finally transmitted through the wall in a given length of time is extremely small.

The same result would follow if the temperture on the metal lined side of the wall was considerably lower. than-the outside temperature. The wall is very simple and ineirpensive to manufacture and has extremely high heat insulating properties.

While I have illustrated herein one embodiment of my inventon I do not wish to be limited to the constructional details shown.

I claim.

1. A heat insulating wall comprising vertical studs, sheathing secured to the studs, panels also secured to the studs, each panel having a holow body portion and bein made of sheet metal having the natura bright reflecting surface with which it is manufactured.

2. As an article of manufacture, a panel for use in a heat insulating wall, said panel being composed of two metal sheets s seed from each other except at the perip eral portion where they are in contact, the se arated walls of the panel presenting brig t reflecting surfaces.

3. A heat insulating wall comprising vertical studs, cross pieces between the studs and sheathing supported by the studs, cross pieces, and sheet metal panel sections secured to the studs and cross pieces, each panel section presenting two sheet metal side spaced from each other and spaced from the sheathing, said sheet metal sides having bright surfaces.

4. As an article of manufacture, a panel for use in a heat insulating wall, said panel being formed of sheet metal havin its natural bri ht reflecting surface and eing formed wit a peripheral flange and a. body portion presenting two separated walls which enclose an air space, the bright reflecting surface co-operating with the air space to increase the heat insulation.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification.

BERNARD R. ANDREWS.

two sections 7 and 8 will be separated from each other to the extent of the depth of the shoulder 6. Such a panel will have a flange or thin portion 6 entirely surrounding it and the space 13 between the walls 7 and 8 will form a dead air 5 ace, the sides of which are formed of bright reflecting surfaces.

Panels made in this way can conveniently be secured in place by nailing them to the studding and cross ieces 4 by means of suitable nails 11, it eing understood that the flange 10 of each panel will be provided with nail holes 12 through which the nails may be driven. Where the panels are made of a size to fit the spaces enclosed by the studding 2 and cross pieces 4 the separate panel sections can be quickly and rapidly put in place after the body portion of the wall has been erected.

Owing to the bright surfaces of the walls 7 and 8 each section will transmit heat to the air relatively slowly and as a result the amount of heat which is transmitted in a given time through a wall such as herein illustrated is extremely small.

If the wall is used in a dry house or dry room I will preferably place the portion of the wall having a sheet metal lining on the interior of the house or room. In this case the temperature on the metal-lined side of the wall is higher than that on the opposite side. The bright surface of the inner face of the section 7 of the wall prevents to a large extent the transmission of heat from the wall 7 into the space 13 between the sections 7 and 8, and the bright surface of the outside face of the section 8 prevents to a large extent the transmission of any heat from the space 13 to the space It between the wall sections 8 and the wooden-supporting portion 1. This wooden supporting portion also has a certain degree of heat insulation so that the total amount of heat which is finally transmitted through the wall in a given length of time is extremely small.

The same result would follow if the temperture on the metal lined side of the wall was considerably lower than the outside temperature. The wall is very simple and inexpensive to manufacture and has extremely high heat insulating properties.

While I have illustrated herein one embodiment of my inventon I do not wish to be limited to the constructional details shown.

I claim.

1. A heat insulating wall comprising vertical studs, sheathing secured to the studs, panels also secured to the studs, each anel having a holow body portion and in made of sheet metal havin the natura bright reflecting surface wit which it is manufactured.

2. As an article of manufacture, a panel for use in a heat insulating wall, said panel being composed of two metal sheets s aced from each other except at the perip eral portion where they are in contact, the se arated walls of the panel presenting brig t reflecting surfaces.

3. A heat insulating wall comprising vertical studs, cross pieces between the studs and sheathing supported by the studs, cross pieces, and sheet metal panel sections secured to the studs and cross pieces, each panel section presenting two sheet metal side spaced from each other and spaced from the sheathing, said sheet metal sides having bright surfaces.

4. As an article of manufacture, a panel for use in a heat insulating wall, said panel being formed of sheet metal havin its natural bri ht reflecting surface and eing formed Wit a peripheral flange and a body portion presenting two separated walls which enclose an air space, the bright refleeting surface co-operating with the air space to increase the heat insulation.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification.

BERNARD R. ANDREWS.

Certificate of Correction.

It is hereby certified that in Letters Patent Nof 1 522 708 an 1925, upon the application of Bernard R. Andrews, of Brziifit ree i5 1iiis ib fii iZest: for an 1mprovement 1n Heat-Insulating-WVall Constructions, ei'rors appear the printed specification requiring correction as follows: Page 2, line 62 claim 1 for the IIIISPBllGd word holow read hollow; same page, line 75, claim 3 strikc gut the word and and insert the ,same in place of the comma after the Word studs in the same l ne, and line 78, for the word side read sides and that the said Letters Patent should be read with these corrections therein that the same ma conform to the record of the case in the Patent Oflice. I I

lgned and sealed this 17th day of February, A. D. 1925.

[sun] KARL FENNING, Actmg Gommiasiomr of Patents.

Certificate of Correction.

It is hereby certified that in Letters Patent No.'1,522,708, granted January 13, 1925, upon the application of Bernard R. Andrews, of Braintree, Massachusetts, for an improvement in Heat-Insulating-Wall Constructions, errors appear in the printed specification requiring correction as follows: Page 2, line 62, claim 1, for the mispelled word holow read hollow; same page, line 75, claim 3, strike out the word and and insert the ,same in place of the comma after the word studs in the same line, and line 78, for the word side read sides; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with these corrections therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Oifice.

Signed and sealed this 17th day of February, A. D. 1925.

[sun] KARL FENNING,

Acting Gommissiorwr of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2671441 *Sep 10, 1948Mar 9, 1954Clyde W HarrisVariable heat insulating apparatus and solar heating system comprising same
US2854565 *Feb 16, 1956Sep 30, 1958A L Smith Iron CompanyLuminous sound absorbing ceiling
US2944622 *Jan 28, 1957Jul 12, 1960Fenestra IncSound absorbing structure
US3174191 *Jun 2, 1961Mar 23, 1965Wood Conversion CoWall-forming structure
US3251168 *Dec 28, 1961May 17, 1966Reynolds Metals CoExterior wall covering and support therefor
US3326657 *Oct 2, 1963Jun 20, 1967Libbey Owens Ford Glass CoEnclosure means in a glass sheet drawing apparatus
US3393920 *Feb 21, 1966Jul 23, 1968Monon Trailer & Body Mfg CompaInsulated vehicle body construction
US4650180 *Nov 14, 1984Mar 17, 1987Hubert BlondelSports ground, in particular tennis court or mini court formed by using removable panels
US5845459 *Dec 24, 1997Dec 8, 1998Nathan; Roger B.Insulating tile
US7703254 *Apr 8, 2008Apr 27, 2010Alderman Robert JReflective insulation tiles
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/406.3, 105/409, 52/795.1
International ClassificationE04B1/76
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/7612
European ClassificationE04B1/76C1