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Publication numberUS1527754 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 24, 1925
Filing dateJun 8, 1923
Priority dateJun 8, 1923
Publication numberUS 1527754 A, US 1527754A, US-A-1527754, US1527754 A, US1527754A
InventorsSylvester J Simon
Original AssigneeSylvester J Simon
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Relaxation chair
US 1527754 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 24. 1925. 1,527,754

5. J. SIMQ'N RELAXATION CHAIR Filed June 8, 1923 4 SheetS -Shee't 1 Fig.1.

114 IN VEN TOR Sylvester a]: Simon ayyfwdga ATTORNEY Feb. 24. 1925. 1,527,754

5. J. SIMON I RELAXAT I ON CBAIR Filed June 8, 1923 if I l E L INVENTOR gs fiFylvesterlfitman' WM KM' ATTORNEY RELAXATION CHAIR Filed June 8 1 23 4 Sheets-Sheet s mum v A TTOR NE Y Feb. 24. 19.25. 1527,7154

. S. J. SIMON RELAXATION CHAIR Filed Juno 8 1923 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 l llllll 30 IN VENTOR 292065201 -J .5? 11mm Wawwd A TTOR NE Y veins and sympathetics.

Patented Feb. 24, 1925.

UNITED STATES SYLVEST'ER J. SIMON, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

RELAXATION CHAIR.

Application filed June 8,

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, SYLVESTER J. SIMON, a citizen of the United States, and resident of New York city, in the county of New York and State of ed certain new and useful Improvements in Z Relaxation Chalrs,

of which the following is The invention relates primarily to a physico-therapeutic method for relaxation and secondarily to a relaxation chair constituting a preferred instrumentalit for practicing the method feature of the isclosure.

It is the usual practice in treating a person to produce relaxation for the skilled operator to flex the limbs in such a way as to place muscles which are usually under tension in a relaxed condition, or even to place them under compression, and on the contrary to place those muscles which are usually under compression either in a relaxed condition or under tension. In perfect relaxation, 110wever, all nerve tracts must be without any compression and this also applies to circulatory systems, comprising the arteries,

The average practitioner in mechanical therapeutics follows a certain course of movements generally to effect an elongation of the several voluntary muscles and in this way acts to place the muscular system to a relaxed condition under what may be called a kinetic relaxation. Such treatment necessarily requires the services of a skilled operator and ordinarily relaxation cannot be obtained by the patients themselves due not only to the fact that the average person is not familiar with the necessary disposition of the parts of the body to effect a relaxation, but also due to the fact that the exertion necessary to effect a relaxing movement involves the expenditure of effort which is not conducive to relaxation. It is further appreciated that a person can relax by lying down or by reclining in a comfortable position and this inactive mode of relaxing will be referred to hereinafter as passive relaxation. However, simply lying down or reclining produces only a partial relaxation for all of the muscular system is not affected when the patient sim ply sits in a chair or reclines on a couch.

More specifically defined therefore the present invention relates to a refinement in the practicing of passive relaxation and a more complete relaxation looking to the ata specification.

New York, have inventa 1923. Serial No. 644,123.

tainment of certain reflex action at present attained only by the practicing of the kinetic manipulation method.

Accordingly the primary object of the invention is to provide a simplified and easily practiced method for passively placing a person under relaxation-and which may be practiced by self-treatment.

Broadly, the invention is attained by disposing the person to be relaxed with the limbs flexed and supported in that position which provides the maximum degree of comfort and to distribute the weight of different parts of the body to supporting parts not usually employed for the purpose of supporting these body parts. For instance, the invention features the supporting or the partial supporting of the torso in such way as will allow for relaxation points at the articulations of the inter-costal, costal transverse and vertebral co-stal articulations, this in turn relieving pressure on the nerve gangli-o-ns at the inter-vertebral fora1nina, located between the individual vertebrae. In general the invention features the supporting of the body either through its skeleton frame structure or through rugged tissue capable of withstanding the pressure incidental to such distribution of weights on the located supports.

Another object of the invention is to mod ify weight distribution on the body gradually and thus minimize fatigue of the involuntary muscular effort to resist such change and to cause the weight to engage supports at those parts of the body where deleterious reaction is least likely to occur.

Accordingly, the invention features the disposition of the body so that the supports will be removed from arteries, connective tissue, nerve plexuses, and any organs which may be effected by pressure bearing on the same.

Referring to the physical aspect of the disclosure the primary object of the invention is to provide a simplified form of relaxation chair by means of which the method feature of the disclosure may be conveniently practiced.

Another objectof the vide a relaxation chair, of which are adjustable, not only to fit different persons but also designed so as to be modified from time to time and thus modify the present position of the several invention is to prothe different parts parts in order to respond to varying conditions after the chair parts have been set initially by the operator to fit a particular person. \Vhile adjustability in the several requisite directions for the several parts are thus featured, a feeling of rigidity in support of certain parts may lead to discomfort on the part of the patient, and accordingly, the invention features flexibility in certain of the supports.

Various other objects and advantages of the invention will be in part obvious from the statements of the method features and from an inspection of the accompanying drawings of a relaxation chair for practicing the method and in part will be more fully setforth in the following particular description of one form of mechanism embodying the physical aspects of the invention, and the invention also consists irf certain new and novel features of construction and combination of parts hereinafter set forth and claimed.

In the drawings:-

Figure 1 is a view of a chair with the lower part in vertical central section from front to rear and the upper part is a view in side elevation coacting to illustrate a method of practicing passive relaxation and also to illustrate a preferred embodiment of the physical aspects of the invention and with parts broken away to show details of construction Figure 2 is a View largely in front elevation of the chair shown in Figure 1 and with parts broken away to show the seat elevator in section;

Fi ure 8 is a View in rear showing in the preceding figures; and

Figure 4 is a plan view looking down upon the chair and with parts of the torso frame at the back broken away.

In the following description and in the claims, parts will be identified by specific names for convenience of expression but they are intended to be as generic in their application to similar parts as the art will permit.

The lower portion of the chair comprises a rectangular frame 10 including upstanding corner-posts 11, horizontal braces 12, and afour arm cast iron spider 13, all coacting to provide a rugged, well-braced foundation for the chair. Guided for vertical movement within the upper portion of the frame is a cushioned seat 14. Fixed to the underside of the seat is a spider 15 which includes a threaded hub 16 in which works an elevating screw 17 journalled for rotary movement. The elevating screw is rotated through a worm drive 18 contained within a casing 19 secured to the spider 13 at the center thereof. The worm is actuated from a control shaft 20 ext-ending rearwardly to the rear portion of the chair, mounted in elevation of the.

journal blocks 21 and actuated from a conveniently disposed hand wheel 22 at the back of the chair. From this construction it will be understood that the seat is held from rotary movement by its guide pro-- vided by the chair frame and that the rota-- tion of the hand wheel 22 in one direction will react through the worm drive and elevating screw to elevate the seat and the reverse movement will cause the seat to be gradually lowered. The worm drive has its inte-rmeshing teeth disposed at such an angle that the seat is locked in adjusted position withoutnecessity of using any separate locking means.

The chair is provided with a back 23, the lower edge of which is connected by means of hinge plates 24 to a hinge rod 25 mounted in bearings 26 formed on the inner faces of the two rear uprights 11, as more par ticularly shown in Figure 3. The back is tilted into rearwardly adjusted position by means of a hand wheel 27 on the shaft of which is mounted a worm-28 in mesh with a gear 29 secured to the rod 25 centrally thereof. The back is locked in its adjusted position by means of clamping screws 30 at opposite edges thereof engaging in segmental slots 31 formed in side plates 32 projecting upwardly from opposite sides of the-frame. The portion of the back adj acent the waist of the occupant is cut-away to provide space for the extension of torso engaging members hereinafter described. Each upper corner of the back is provided with a pair of shoulder pieces 33 spaced apart to form a recess 34 for receiving a head-rest 35. The head-rest is pivotally connected by means of a hinge 36 with the upper end of a rack 37 slidably mounted in a guide-way 38 secured to the back below the recess. The rack is raised and lowered by means of a feed screw 39 and is locked in position by means of a jam nut 40. The head piece is locked in its rearwardly tilted position by means of a jam screw 41 and the head-piece is slidably mounted for bodily adjustment relative to the back by a sliding block guideway connection 42, with one of the hinge leaves forming the block locked to the head-rest by means of a set screw 43. From this construction it will be understood. that the head rest may be adjusted both vertically and at an angle and may be locked in such adjusted position.

A pair of torso supporting frames 44 and 45 extend forwardly from the reduced portion of the back and are curved in opposite directions about the body of the occupant. As these frames are similar in construction a detailed description of either one will be sufficient for the other with obvious changes in construction to meet the requirements of a left and right body encircling engagement.

The frames each include a relatively deep curved plate 46 having its greatest dimensions vertically disposed so as to receive maximum pressure with the least possible use of material and in this way feature a light, readily movable structure. The back edge of each plate is provided with a rack 47 and is mounted for vertical movement in the back by means of a dove-tail projection 48 engaging in a slot 49 as more particularly shown in the broken away portion of Figure 4. The pair of racks 47 face each other and are geared soas to move in unison through the agency of a gear train including a pair of gears 50 and 51 meshing respectively with the racks 47. One of the gears is provided with a turn-wheel 52, so that the actuation of the single wheel will cause both gears to turn in unison to effect simultaneously either an elevation or a lowering of the torso supporting frames. VVhen' adjusted to their desired positions, considered vertically, the frames are locked to the back by means of jam-screws 53 and 54.

Each of the frames is provided with a plurality of torso engaging wedges of which two, 55 and 56, are shown in Figure 4. As these wedges are of similar construction and may be mounted wherever desired about the length of the frame, only one will be described. For the purpose of receiving the wedge the plate is provided with a pair of vertically spaced and longitudinally extending slots 57 and 58 (see Fig. 3). in the slots are sliding blocks 59 which are secured in locked position by jam bolts 60. txtending horizontally through the upper block 57 is a. feed screw 61 pivotally connected at its inner end to the back of the wedge adjacent its upper end. Similarly a feed screw 62 extends through the lower block 58 and engages the back of the wedge adjacent its lower portion. Each of the wedges is formed of a rigid metallic back plate 63 and a front, cushioned, body-engaging face 64. These wedges are of greater width horizontally at their bottom portion and. converges in width towards their u per edges. The cushioned face 64 is inclined downwardly and inwardly from the vertical and in general it will be understood that these wedges are designed to fit against and somewhat under the ribbed structure of the torso and are so disposed that, as the wedges are raised into engagement with the body, or when the seat is lowered, as hereinafter described, the wedges will bear gently construction it will be against the ribbed structure and thus tend to support the upper portion of the occupants torso at points spaced circumferentially'from the vertebral column. From this obvious that practically any variation in position may be provided for the wedging faces. It will be a usual practice for the operator in adjust Mounted ing the chair to any particular person to select on the person that place or places where pressure can be most conveniently received, and then by manipulation of the several adjustments bring the several wedges into bearing engagement with the selected place or places. In adjusting the parts to some persons of frail structure, or to those who are peculiarly sensitive to any novel treatment, the wedge surfaces will be disposed almost vertical so as to minimize wedging pressure on the torso and in later stages of the treatments the wedges may be inclined with greater and greater angle to the vertical and in this way increase the wedging engagement with the body and gradually increase the proportion of weight carried by the back of the chair compared to the weight carried by the seat of the chair. 7

In order to minimize the proportion of torso weight supported through the ribbed structure of the patient, means are provided for directly supporting the axillae. For this purpose there is provided a pair of ad justable shoulder joint supports 65 and 66 which engage under the axillae and for this reason will be referred to hereinafter as aXilla supports. As these supports are similar in construction, the description of either one will be sufficient for the other. It is intended that these supports be carried by the back so as to be movable therewith and this connection is most conveniently attained by utilizing one of the wedges on each side of the chair for the purpose of carrying the aXilla rib supports. Each support (see Fig. 1) includes apair of curved jaws 67 and 68 facing each other and designed to engage under the muscle structure I defining the front and rear sides of the muscular construction of theshoulder joint leaving the axilla rib space free of engagement and in this way eliminating any pressure on the arteries and veins in the axilla space. Each of the jaws is pivotally connected to a screw block 69 and the jaws are designed to be secured in relatively adjusted position by means of a screw nut 70. The screw blocks are connected by means of ri ht and left handed threads on a screw rod 71 extending through a supporting block 72. The screw blocks 69 are held from rotary movement by means of pins 73 extending into holes formed in the adjacent faces of the block 7 2. The block 72 constitutes" the upper end of an elevating screw 74 threaded through an elevating nut 75 and extending upwardly from a support provided by the frame 63 of one of the wedges. It is apparent from this construction that the axilla support on each side may be adjusted first to fit the axilla on the occupant of the chair and then the supports when so adjusted, may be elevated relative to the torso engaging parts so that the Weight of the shoulders will be transmitted directly to the back of the chair and through parts sufficiently massive to transmit the strains without distortion.

While not necessary to the operation of the chair it is herein suggested that supports be provided for engaging the upper arm between the elbow and shoulder joint to be associated with the chair. For this purpose there is provided on opposite sides upper arm rests 7 6 and 77, preferably supported from the adjacent torso frames 4-1 and 45. The rests each include an outer cushioned face 78 from the supporting back frame 79 of which extends a screw rod 80. This rod is threaded through a feed nut 81 rotatably mounted in the outer end of an arm 82 pivotally connected by means of a lug 83 with the side of the torso supporting frame and secured in adjusted position by means of the jam nut 8-1. The outer face of the support is curved to substantially fit under the arm of the occupant and to extend transversely of the arm.

There is provided on opposite sides of the chair a pair of forearm supporting rests 85 and 86. These rests each include outstanding and upwardly extending brackets 87 pivotally connected to the sides of the chair by swivels 88. The upper free end of each of the brackets 87 is bent to provide a horizontally extending supporting plate 89. The plate is perforated to provide a pair of spaced apart apertures and through these apertures extend a pair of upwardly disposed bolts 90 and 91. These bolts engage at their upper end with the broad base 92 of a rocking member 93. Coiled springs 94: and95 respectively encircle the bolts 90 and 91 and act to provide a resilient support for the rocking member 93. Extending through the rocking member is a threaded bolt 96 advanced vertically by means of a nut 97 to raise and lower the rest while maintaining the resiliency of the mounting for the same.

From this construction it is understood that the bracket may be swung bodily about its pivotal connection 88 to bring'the arm rest below the position of the forearm with which it is intended to engage. The rest may then be elevated by the manipulation of the nut 97 so as to bring the cushioned face of the rest into desired bearing engagement with the located forearm. By means of the resilient mounting of the rest it is possible to provide a flexible support to the forearm which will have suilicient rigidity to support the weight of the forearm and at the same time will permit slight movement of the forearm while maintaining contact with the same and thus avoid any feeling of rigidity between the persons arm and the support therefor.

The seat is designed primarily to provide.

only a partial support for the buttocks of the occupant. It is the intent of this disclosure to provide a separate means to support the legs independently of the buttock and in this way provide for any desired angularity between the torso and the legs and to provide for relative angularity of the legs relative to each other when considered with relation to parallel vertical planes. For this purpose there is provided a pair of leg supports 98 and 99. As shown in Fig. 1 the front edlge of the chair is broken away to provide a pair of transversely disposed recesses 100 for accommodating the leg supports. Here again the leg supports are similar in construction and the detailed description of either one will be sufiicient for the other. The supports are each positioned on a bracket 101 extending inwardly from the adjacent front uprights of the frame. The bracket is provided at its inner end with a boss 102 in which is mounted a feed screw 103 movable vertically by a hand wheel 104. Fixed to the boss 102 is an upwardly extending U-support 105 to the upper ends of each leg of which is pivotally connected a pair of leg engaging cushions 106 and 107. The members each'include a cushioned face 108 and a downwardly and outwardly extending arm 109 to the lower end of which is connected a link 110 pivotally connected to the upper end of the feed screw. From this construction it will be noted that the leg engaging members are spaced apart transversely in all positions of the same so as to engage the occupants legs and the legs are so supported in spaced relation that no pressure is brought to bear on the popliteal and femoral arteries or the saphenous and femoral veins passing through the poplil'cal space. Moving the feed screw vertically will change the angular relation of the leg engaging cushioned faces of the supports and in this way insure a selective arrangement for engaging the occupants legs.

It is further suggested in this disclosure that means he provided for engaging the feet of the occupant of thechair in the several adjusted positions of the legs, and preferably the engagement should be with suflicient intensity to provide a resilient support capable of supporting or partially supporting the weight of the foot and the lower part of the legs. For this purpose there is provided a foot rest 111 extending along the front and at the bottom of the chair. This rest includes a cushionedplate 112 sup ported by bracket 113 pivotally mounted upon a supporting rod 114r-and actuated by coiled springs 115 and 116 which tend to elevate the foot rest.

In operation and following one approved practice in relaxing a patient, the person to be treated is positioned in the chair and scribed. The occupant of the chair is then clamped within the torso supporting members which are adjusted as previously de scribed to provide for the desired intensity of engagement between the frame structure of the ribs and the several located wedgingsupports.

As a person is peculiarly sensitive to pressure on the diaphragm, particular care is exercised in locating the wedges so as to provide for a comfortable and equally distributed pressure of the body weight and the wedges are so arranged that when the seat is lowered, as hereinafter described, there will be a slight tendency to elevate the upper portion of the body relative to the buttocks. The axilla supports having been adjusted to engage under the arms and the other parts adjusted, as indicated, the lowering of the seat will cause a slight tendency to raise the shoulders and in this way tend to release pressure of the shoulder weight on the lower portion of the body. While the chair is utilized in the course of treating a patient therapeutically, it will be a usual practice to modify the intensity of engagement with parts usually not utilized as supporting parts to the body and to increase the intensity of engagement as the treatment progresses and the parts of the body become used to the engagement therewith by the supporting parts of the chair. The head-rest may then be positioned in order to provide a comfortable position for the occupant of'the chair. The occupants arms are then exposed in the position where greatest degree of relaxation is felt, and the several upper and lower arm supports are adjusted in position to provide a desired intensity of engagement with the supported and adjusted parts of the occupants arms. The leg supports, are then adjusted vertically so as to give such an angularity to the upper part of the leg so that when the body is slightly lowered as hereinafter described, the proper angularity, to attain maximum relaxation is provided. As the legs are elevated the spring controlling the foot rest follow the feet and maintains any degree of engagement therewith.

The final act of adjusting the chair consists in slightly lowering the seat. The effect of this movement will be to distribute the weight of the operator which would ordinarily be carried entirely by the back and seat. A portion of this weight is distributed to the other adjusted supports particularly to the torso supports.

The general effect of the occupant of the chair when so adjusted is to place the voluntary muscles of the limbs and arms under relaxation allowing perfect relaxation or rest, perfect circulation and a sedative nerve reaction, thus obtaining activity of the circulation. In general, it will be understood that the utilization of any of the parts or the omission of any of the discretion of the operator who sets the chair to the patient and that parts herein shown to be adjustable may be secured in place where the chair is designed for some particular person.

It is noted that all of the body supporting parts are exposed in such a way that the engaged parts may be readily removed without necessity of moving any of the chair parts. The advantage of this construction is that after a chair has been set for a particular person, that person may repeatedly position himself in the chair with its previously adjusted parts and without necessity of resetting the chair for each treatment, or each period of relaxation.

While I have shown and described, and have pointed out in the annexed claims, cer tain novel features of my invention, it will be understood that various omissions, substitutions and changes in the form and details of the device illustrated and in its operation may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a vertically disposed supporting frame adapted to extend partially about one side of the occupants torso, a torso engaging wedge supported by the frame, the face of the ,wedge which is designed to engage the torso being inclined downwardly and slightly inwardly from the vertical towards the occupant thereby to form a wedging engagement with the rib structure of the occup'ants torso.

2. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a vertically disposed supporting frame adapted to extend partially about one side of the occupants torso, a torso engaging wedge supported by the frame, the face of the wedge which is designed to engage the torso being inclined downwardly and slightly inwardly from the vertical towards the occupant thereby to form a wedging engagement with the rib structure of the occupants torso and means for bodily elevating the wedge vertically into wedging engagement with the rib structure.

3 In a relaxation chair, the combination of a vertically disposed supporting frame adapted to extend partially about one side of the occupants torso, a torso engaging wedge supported by the frame, the face of the wedge which is designed to engage the the parts is within Cir torso being inclined downwardly and slightly inwardlyfrom the vertical towards the occupant thereby to form a wedging engagement with the rib structure of the occupants torso and means providing independent supports for the limbs, buttocks and head of the occupant.

4. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a supporting back, a torso frame in the form of a curved plate extending from the back and designed to partially encircle the torso of the occupant, said plate having its greatest dimension extending vertically to provide for maximum strength vertically with the least possible amount of material, the rear edge of said plate constituting a rack, a pinion coacting with the rack to pro vide a rack and pinion means for elevating the frame and a cushioned torso engaging member carried on the inner side of the curved frame plate.

5. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a supporting back, a torso frame in the form of a curved plate extending from the back and designed to partially encircle the torso of the occupant, said plate having its greatest dimension extending vertically to provide for maximum strength vertically with the least possible amount of material, the rear edge of said plate constituting a rack, a. pinion coacting with the rack to provide a rack and pinion means for elevating the frame, said plate provided with a plurality of vertically spaced and horizontally extending slots, blocks slidably mounted in said slots, a cushioned torso engaging member and feed screws threaded through said blocks and engaging said member to adjust the same relative to the frame.

(3. In a device of the class described, the combination of a vertically disposed torso frame, a torso engaging member provided with a wedge face and adjusting means between the frame and vertically spaced apart points on the member for varying the angularity of the wedge face relative to the vertioal.

7. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a plurality of torso engaging wedges adapted to engage under the rib structure of the occupant and on opposite sides thereof, means for adjusting the wedge face of each of said wedges relative to each other, and a single control means for moving all of the wedges simultaneously into wedging engagement with opposite sides of the torso.

8. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a plurality of torso engaging wedges adapted to engage under the rib structure of the. occupant and on opposite sides thereof, means for adjusting the wedge face of each of said wedges relative to each other, means for bodily adjusting the wedges relative to each other, and a single control means for moving all of the wedges simultaneously into wedging engagement with opposite sides of the torso.

9. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a vertically adjustable seat, a back, a torso supporting member carried by the back and vertically adjustable relative thereto, an axilla support carried by said member, movable therewith whereby the elevation of the member into operative engagement with the torso will simultaneously elevate the axilla support into its operative position.

10. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a vertically adjustable seat, a back, a torso supporting member carried by the back and vertically adjustable relative thereto, an

axilla support carried by said member, ad

justable relative thereto and movable therewith whereby the elevation of the member into operative engagement with the torso will simultaneously elevate the axillasupport into its operative position.

11. In a device of the class described, the combination of a torso frame, a body ongaging unit carried thereby, movable therewith and readily demounted therefrom, said unit comprising a torso engaging wedge for engaging under the rib structure of the occupant of the device, and an arm support adjustable relative to the wedge.

12. In a device of the class described, the combination of a frame, an axilla support mounted for vertical adjustment on said frame, said support comprising a pair of curved clamping jaws, adapted to receive the axilla therebetween, means for adjusting the jaws horizontally to fit beneath the axilla.

13. In a device of the class described, the

combination of a frame, an axilla supportmounted on said frame, said support comprising a pair of curved clamping jaws, adapted to receive the axilla therebetween, means for adjusting the jaws horizontally to fit beneath the axilla, the underside of said jaws being spaced apart to prevent the support from contactingdirectly with the axillary, brachial and also thoracic arteries and cephatic, brachial and bascilic veins.

14:. In a device of the class described, the combination of a frame, an axilla support mounted on the frame, said support comprising a pair of curved jaws, means for adjusting the jaws relative to each' other to and from their engagement with the underside of the axilla and means for adjusting the jaws relative to each other and about an axis extending parallelto their clamping direction.

15. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a seat, axilla supports for engaging under the axilla of the occupant, said supports being concaved and designed to engage the axilla on opposite sides of the arteries and veins in axillary space, said supports being adjustable relative to each other to insure a fit under each axilla and means for locking the supports in adjusted position.

16. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a seat, means independent ofthe seat for supporting the torso of the occupant, and adjustable means for engaging each arm of the occupant at a plurality of points along the length of the arm.

17 In a relaxation chair, the combination of a back, a seat, a support for engaging the torso of the occupant, and an arm support carried by the torso support for positioning an arm of the occupant in fixed relation to the back, seat and torso support.

18. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a back, a seat, a support for engaging the torso of the occupant, an arm support carried by the torso support for locating and positioning an arm of the applicant in fixed relation to the back, seat and torso support and means engaging the torso support for simultaneously moving the same and the arm locating support.

19. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a back, a seat, a support for engaging the torso of the occupant, an arm support earried by the torso support for positioning an arm of the applicant in fixed relation to the back, seat and torso support and means for adjusting the position of the arm support relative to the torso support.

20. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a seat, a back, and a plurality of supports each adjustable relative to the other, said supports including an axilla. support for engaging under and tending to support the axilla, another support adapted to be adjusted to engage under and support the upper arm and a third support for engaging under and supporting the forearm.

21." In a relaxation chair, the combination of a seat, a back, and a plurality of supports each adjustable relative to the other, said supports including an axilla support for engaging under and tending to support the axilla, another support adapted to be adjusted to engage under and support the upper arm, a third support for engaging under and supporting the forearm, and means for elevating the axilla and the upper arm supports simultaneously and independent of the forearm support.

22. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a horizontally extending support, a pair of vertically extending bolts passed loosely through the support, a nut carried by the bolts, springs on each bolt between the support and the nut acting to resiliently support the nut, and a forearm rest including a screw bolt threaded through the nut for vertical adjustment.

23.- In a relaxation chair, the combination of a seat for supporting the buttocks of the occupants of the chair, a pair of supports for the occupants legs, each support including a pair of parallel leg engaging members transversely spaced apart to engage the supported leg on opposite sides of the popliteal and femoral arteries, saphenous and femoral veins.

24. In a relaxation chair, the combination of a support, a screw vertically adjustable in said support, a pair of upwardly diverging arms pivoted to the screw, a pair of leg engaging members with their leg engaging faces inclined towards each other, one arm pivoted to the upper end of one of the leg engaging members and the other arm correspondingly pivoted to the other leg engaging member and an upstanding V-shaped frame secured at its base to the support having the upper end of one of its parts pivoted to one of the leg engaging members and the up per end of the other part similarly pivoted to the other leg engaging member.

Signed at New York city in the county of New York and State of New York this 5th day of June A. D. 1923.

. SYLVES'IER J. SIMON.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification601/24, 297/284.1, 297/463.2, 297/423.26, 297/464, 297/284.11, 297/411.31, 5/630, 297/284.9
International ClassificationA61G5/10, A61G5/12
Cooperative ClassificationA61G5/1067, A61G2200/54, A61G5/12, A61G2005/121, A61G2005/125, A61G5/1059, A61G2005/1091, A61G2005/128
European ClassificationA61G5/12, A61G5/10S2, A61G5/10S8