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Publication numberUS1528017 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 3, 1925
Filing dateOct 10, 1921
Priority dateOct 10, 1921
Publication numberUS 1528017 A, US 1528017A, US-A-1528017, US1528017 A, US1528017A
InventorsGammeter John R
Original AssigneeHarry W Smith, Gammeter John R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club
US 1528017 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Mar. 3; 192s.

J. R. GAMMETER.

vvGOLF CLUB Filed oct. 1o, 1921 Innen/Z0?" Ja/uLZam/nefr y 'fe/6.2K

` of"swing an "-fwhich will Patented Maas, 1925.

UNITED srflrlsy lPasr'lrr foFFlcE.

.Toma n. emma, or A31-zon', onto, assmnoaro nmsnnr AND maar w.

y smrn, or AxaoN', omo.

GoLr onus.

' .Application fled October 10, 1921.' Serial No. 506,730;

To all-'whom t may concern: y

Be it known that I. JOHN R. GAMMnTER,\a\

citizen of the United States, residing at Akron, in the county of Summitv and Statel ll of Ohio, have invented new and usefulv Iml round shafts and,'in wooden clubs, the club r head is provided with a sole surface, a top vsurface and a rear surface. cure length in driving the ball, the club must be swung very .%uickly through the air and is traveling wit great rapidity at.` the moment of impact. yDuring the playing stroke, air is carried forward in the path of travel and is packed in front of the rapidly moving parts of the club and a vacuum or partial vacuum is formed along the trailing edge thereof, retarding the progress of the club and causing it to deviate from the 'true line of travel. AkObjects. of this linvention are to provide a stream line golf club, or other playing implement, which may be swung through the air with great rapidity and which will overcome the above objections and provide means whereby a golf bal-1 may be driven more accurately and to a .greater length-than f has heretofore been attainable.

. Another important object, which may be considered entirely apart from the obiects above set forth, is to provide a club shaft v o of elongated cross section, having( its greatest diameter disposed at a right angle to avertical plane passing through the shaft and club head-and to thus providea shaft which is relatively stronger-and possesses .45 greater rigidityl along a. plane extending longitudinally therethroughy and. runningv with the Aplane of swing so`that* the shaftA will remainfrm and .present the head Solidly to the ball.

A further object which may \be' considered in connection with the above object is to provide a club shaft which will lbe relatively splingy" or whippy, in 'al vertical plane runnin at a right anglglto the plane drawings 'wherein I have illustrated an em- In order to sef The numeral -9 is employed to indicate the d upwardly when the club, head is brought into contact with the lturf and will permit the club y Vhead to slide forward to the ball with a minimum lossof force.

The above objections are overcome and the objects hereinbefore set forth are at` tained by the novel construction hereinafter described and shown lin the accompaying bodiment of myv invention, it being understood that the invention is capable ofv various adaptations and that changes and modifications may be made orsubstitutions resorted to whlch come within the scope of the claims hereunto appended.

In the drawings in which similar numerals of reference have been employed to designate like parts as the same may occur in the several views and 1n wh1ch:-

Figure l is a front elevation of a golf club constructedin accordance with this invention and showing the same as it is positioned at the moment of impact.

'Figure 2 is'a top plani view of a club I hlagl and alsor'showing a portion of the club 80 s a t.

Figure 3 is a vertical. sectional view taken yapproximately on the line 3 3 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is an elevational view o f a club head looking toward the toe thereof.

Figure 5 is a rear elevation of'same. Figure 6 illustrates a series of cross sectional views of a club shaft' as taken on" the lines a-a, b-b," o-c and d -d' of Figure 1. 90

For the purpose of clearly describing l, my invention, thefnumeral 7 has beenused inthe drawings 'to denote. the club/shaft and the numeral 8 to denote the club head. 96 forward or cleaving edge' of the shaft 7. v

vIn the adaptation of the invention illustrated, it .will be noted that the cleaving edge continues aldng 'the forward edgev of the club and extends downwardly along the club headterminating at the club face 8. The .numeral 10 denotes. the trailing edge of the shaft and in clubs of the character described in the drawings, the edge 10 continues downwardly along the rear edge of the club shank and curves into a. horizontal line running entirely around the trailing edge of the club and extending around the 'toe 8h of theclub, terminating at thev club face 8*. .The s'ole 8 of the lclub head'8 has 4110 a flat horizontally disposed central surface y which extendsstraight back from the lower edge of the club face 8 and merges into an'upn'ardly curved marginahsurfa'ce which meets the upper surface 8 of the clubalong the lines 9 and 10 and, at the heel of the club, the sole surface 8d continues upwardly and merges into the under surface of the shank., The upper ,face 8 is substantially convex and, except at the club face, intersects the sole surface' 8d at an angle along the lines 9 and l0. For practical purposes I prefer to slightly round the edge formed by the meeting upper and lower faces of the club as will be' noted by a careful examination of Figures 3 and 4.

Attention is now called to the several views included in Figure 6 and to the differing cross sectional contours disclosed therein. It will be noted that each of said views discloses an elongated cross section of, the other.

having its greatest diameter disposed transversely to a vertical plane passing through rthe shaft and club head. The greatest oliafineter at any instance extends between the edges 9 and v10 andsimilar portions ofthe shaft lie on opposite sides of the plane eX- tending with the lines 9 and 10. 'Ihe inner 'or under face 7b "of the club shaft 7 and the upper or outer faced?c thereof are of approximately equal area and each of said surfaces are formed with a stream line eurvature. The surfaces 7c and 7b intersect along the line 10 at a relatively sharper angle than the angle formed at the intersection of said surface along the line 9 and the shaft is thus formed so that a vertical plane passing through the center thereo dividesthe club into a relatively blunt forward portion and a tapering rear portion. The grip portion 7a of the shaft 1s preferably cylindrical and the shaft tapers downwardly therefrom, with a constantly changing cross sectional contour, to its juncture with the vhead 8. In the adaption of the invention disclosed 1n the drawing, the upper surface 8 of theclub head and the upper surface 7 of the shaft are alined at apoint of juncture. Each ofsaid surfaces Vconstituting a continuation The lower surface 7by of the shaft and. the lower surface 8d of the club ead are likewise alined, thus forming a `club having a smooth continuous upper and lower surface When properly used, both the forward edge 9y and the trailing edge 10 of my improved shaft will lie in the plane of'swing during the playing stroke. The edge 9 will cleave-the air and the surfaces 7h and 7 are of a contour which will permit the air, dlsplaced by the forward motion of the shaft) to flow smoothly around the shaft so that no 'air will be carried forward thereby to be packed along the forward edge thereof.

'constructed so that it will give or bend in During the forward stroke, thefair displaced by the movement of the shaft or club head will ow smoothly therearound. to the trailing edge 10 thereof, thus. preventing the formation of a vacuum or partial vacuum along the trailing edge of any part of the club.

While my improved shaft is intended to present the head solidly to the ball, it is a vertical plane at themoment of impact, the shaft 7 is relatively thin adjacent the bottom thereof and constantly increases in cross sectional area to the grip portion thereof. T f during the playing stroke, the club head is brought into`contact with the turf, the shaft 9 will bend upwardly adjacent the bottom thereof and the club may bc forced along the turf` to the point of impact without seriously retarding its" motion.

In carrying out my invention, I prefer to conform substantially to the contour disclosed by the' several instances illustrated in Figure 6. The shape of the shaft at any point depending upon its distance from the center` of swing, but it isto be understood that I am not confined to the exaet'contour therein shown.

In some forms of clubs, it may be found impraeticable to construct 'aj club head in accordance with this invention and in some instances individual preference'may require that the principles herein disclosed be applied to the club head only and it is therefore understood that the invention is applicable to any part of the club. As this invention is of commanding importance in, the art of constructing golf clubs or similar implements. protection thereon is claimed in its broadest possible scope.

Having thus illustrated my invention and4 described the same in detail, what I claim as new and desire to securev by Letters- Patent is v 1-. In a golf club, a head [having a striking facega sole surface and a top surface, sai surfaces converging from said striking'faoe and meeting at an angle along a horizontal line extending around the rear edgel of the 115 toe and head.

2. In a golf club, a. head having a striking face, a sole surface and atop surface, the said surfaces converging in a streami 'line curvature and intersecting along amo .ing face and upper and lower lsurfaces 125.

which intersect around the entire marginal edges thereof. U

4. In a golf. club, a head having a striking face and upper and lower surfaces, the

marginal portions of which intersect to 13- fori'n a knife-like edge extending .centrally of the club head from the toe end of the striking face, around the toe and trailing ing face and intersecting upper and lower ZIO the toe to the striking a' striking faceand` intersecti'n surfaces, the line of intersection being disposed along the rear edge of the neck, around the trailing edge of the head4 and extending around the toe of the clubto the striking face thereof. l

7. In a golf club, a club headhaving a striking face and intersecting upper and lower surfaces, the said surfaces .intersecting in a line disposed along the trailing edge of the neck and head and -extendin around face and a so intersecting in a line running along the forward edge of the neck and extending along the head to the striking face.

In a golf club, a club head having a upper and lower surfaces and havin a s aft of elongated cross section provi ed with intersecting-upper and lower surfaces, one of the lines of intersection extending from the striking face around the toe, the trailing edge of the head and neck and along the trailing edge of the shaft.; the other line of intersection extending from the opposite end of the striking face along the forward edge of the head, neck and shaft.

9. In a golf club, a club head having a striking face and intersecting upper and lower surfaces, with the line of intersection extending from thestriking face around th l toe and trailing edge of the head and alon the trailing edge of the neck and provide with a shaft having intersecting upper and lower surfaces with the line of intersection disposed along the trailing edge ofthe shaft :1nd constituting a continuation of the first named line of. intersection.

10. A club head. having 'a striking face and intersecting upper and lower surfaces, 4

one line of intersection running from the heel end of the striking face along the for- -ward edge of the club and shaft, the other line of intersection ruiming from the toe end of the striking face around the toe and y along the trailing 'edge-` of the head and shaft.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand.

' JOHN n. GAMMETER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2491383 *Nov 30, 1945Dec 13, 1949Liolich Samuel NPutter head
US4838555 *Feb 1, 1988Jun 13, 1989Maruman Golf Co., Ltd.Head of wood type golf club
US5120061 *Apr 19, 1990Jun 9, 1992Yamaha CorporationGolf club head
US5190289 *Mar 14, 1991Mar 2, 1993Mizuno CorporationGolf club
US5251896 *Oct 18, 1991Oct 12, 1993Sportex Gmbh & Co.Golf club shaft made from fibre-reinforced plastic
US5288079 *Nov 27, 1991Feb 22, 1994Maruman Golf Kabushiki KaishaGolf wood clubhead
US5335908 *Dec 31, 1992Aug 9, 1994Bamber Jeffrey VGolf club shaft
US5398935 *Sep 15, 1993Mar 21, 1995Maruman Golf Kabushiki KaishaGolf wood clubhead
US5451048 *Nov 23, 1993Sep 19, 1995Yamaha CorporationGolf club head
US5511780 *Jul 6, 1995Apr 30, 1996Vadersen; ErnieGolf club hosel
US5575725 *Jun 5, 1995Nov 19, 1996Acushnet CompanyGolf club hosel configuration
US5669830 *Apr 25, 1996Sep 23, 1997Bamber; Jeffrey VincentPerimeter weighted golf clubs
US5827132 *Mar 8, 1997Oct 27, 1998Pelican Golf, Inc.Perimeter weighted golf clubs
US5873793 *Dec 23, 1997Feb 23, 1999Swinford; Mark D.Golf club and associated manufacturing method
US5913733 *Oct 15, 1996Jun 22, 1999Bamber; Jeffrey VincentGolf club shaft
US5921870 *Dec 6, 1996Jul 13, 1999Chiasson; James P.Aerodynamic shaft
US5976032 *Nov 10, 1997Nov 2, 1999You; Chin-SanGolf club reinforced by ridges
US6251028 *Nov 23, 1998Jun 26, 2001Al JacksonGolf club having a head with enlarged hosel and curved sole plate
US6332848Jan 28, 2000Dec 25, 2001Cobra Golf IncorporatedMetal wood golf club head
US6561922Sep 20, 2001May 13, 2003Jeffrey Vincent BamberGolf club shaft
US6702693Nov 22, 2002Mar 9, 2004Pelican Golf, Inc.Perimeter weighted golf clubs
US6881157 *Dec 11, 2003Apr 19, 2005Chih-Ching HsienGolf club having stabilized air flow structure
US7022033Sep 2, 2003Apr 4, 2006Pelican Golf, Inc.Perimeter weighted golf clubs
US7128663Nov 22, 2002Oct 31, 2006Pelican Golf, Inc.Perimeter weighted golf clubs
US9072949 *May 31, 2012Jul 7, 2015Nike, Inc.Golf clubs and golf club heads having interchangeable rear body members
US20030073511 *Nov 22, 2002Apr 17, 2003Bamber Jeffrey VincentPerimeter weighted golf clubs
US20040097298 *Nov 15, 2002May 20, 2004Hsieh Chih ChingGolf club having stabilized air flow structure
US20040121851 *Dec 11, 2003Jun 24, 2004Chih-Ching HsienGolf club having stabilized air flow structure
US20090075752 *Sep 2, 2008Mar 19, 2009Sri Sports LimitedGolf club head
US20120015756 *Jul 19, 2010Jan 19, 2012Milton Thomas MellonAerodynamic balanced wood form and/or iron form golf club
US20130040755 *May 31, 2012Feb 14, 2013Nike, Inc.Golf Clubs and Golf Club Heads Having Interchangeable Rear Body Members
US20150182821 *Mar 10, 2015Jul 2, 2015Nike, Inc.Golf Clubs and Golf Club Heads Having Interchangeable Rear Body Members
US20170036085 *Jun 9, 2015Feb 9, 2017Takahito SuzukiSports practice tool
USD425158Jan 28, 1999May 16, 2000Cobra Golf IncorporatedGolf club head
WO1995029741A1 *Aug 2, 1994Nov 9, 1995Jeffrey Vincent BamberGolf club shaft
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/327, 144/24.22, 473/317, 144/24.24
International ClassificationA63B53/10, A63B53/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/10, A63B53/04, A63B59/0014
European ClassificationA63B53/04, A63B53/10