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Publication numberUS1531189 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 24, 1925
Filing dateJun 18, 1923
Priority dateJun 18, 1923
Publication numberUS 1531189 A, US 1531189A, US-A-1531189, US1531189 A, US1531189A
InventorsJames A Johnson
Original AssigneeDanville Conditioning Machine
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Yarn-moistening mechanism
US 1531189 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Mmh 24', 1925. 1,531,189

4 J. A. JOHNSON YARN -MOI STEN ING MECHANISM Z7 Z6 ln/vento@ -Mmh 221.1925; 1,531,139Y

J. A. JoHNsoN y YARN MOISTENING MEGHANISM Filed June` 18 1923 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 31a/vento@ 'March 24, 1925. 1,531,189

J. A. JOHNSON YARN MOISTENING MEcHANrsM Fi1ed June 1e, 1923- s sheets-sheet 5 y lo Patented Mar. 24, v1,925.

UNITED STATES 1,531,189 Pa'rENr' OFFICE.

:uns A. JOHNSON, or DANVILLE, VIRGINIA, AssIGNoa 'ro baNvILLE CONDITION- ING momma oonrm, INC., or DANVILLE, vmonrra, a yCORPORATION F VIRGINIA.

Application mea :une 1s, 1923. swarm. 646,094.

To all wlw-m it may cme-m.'

Be it known that I, JAMES A. JOHNSON, a. citizen of the United States, residing at Danville, in the county of Pittsylvania and State `of Vir inia, have invented Icertain o new and use ul Improvements in Yarn Moistening Mechanisms, lof which the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings.y

This invention relates to the conditioning o r treating of yarn prior to its being wound in a windingmachine, and particularly to means for supplying moisture to the yarn or conditioning it, as itis called. In the ordinary conditioning of yarn, the yarn is wound uponV cones and these are placed within the conditioning room where they are submitted to the action of moisture, the room being filled with a very fine spray or vapor from a suitable spraying pipe. This moisture sets the twist and prevents kinking, but is objectionable in that the outside layers of the yarn on a cone must be moistened beyond the proper percentage in order that the insidelayers ofvyarn shall have the proper percentage of moisture.

The general object of the present invention is to condition the yarn by the provision of means whereby the yarn is moistened as it is being wound upon the cone, and provide means whereby a uniform amount of moisture shall be supplied to all the yarn so that the inner layers of the yarn on the cone will have just as Amuch moisture 'and no more than the outerlayers, thus preventing the.milclewing of the outer layers.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a moistening device of this character which does not use rollers or like rotating moistening Vdevices and thus avoids any chance of the yarn,"'in case it breaks, getting wound up on the rollers.

A still further object is to provide a mechanism of this character which is very simple so constructed that it may be readily cleaned.

Another Object kis to provide a mechanism of this character in which the yarn is inoistenedby means oftwo or more moistening members which are alternately immersed in a tank containing water or water and oil or any other li uid and which is disposed between the bob ins of a winding machine and the cones on which' the yarn is wound,

and effective in its operation, and which is and provide mechanism whereby these moistenlng members are intermittently immersed and then raised into contact with the yarn, the mechanism being such 'that one of the moistening members is always 1n contact with the yarn and supplying moisture thereto.

Other objects have to do with the details of construction and arrangement of parts asewill. appear more fully hereinafter.

My invention is illustrated in the accompanylng drawings, wherein F 1gure 1 is a fragmentary elevation'of an ordinary winding machine showing my improvement applied thereto, parts of the framework of the `machine being in section;

F1gure 2 is a perspective view of a p0rtlon of a winding machine with my mechamsm applied thereto;

Figure 3 is a transverse section on an enlarged scale taken through the moistening members and showing in connection therewith one of the bobbins and one of the windlng rollers;

Figure 4 is a longitudinal section through one end of the trough, showing the actuating levers for the moistening members;

Flgure 5 is an elevation of the end of the trough and the Operating levers illustrating the means whereby the Operating levers are oscillated;

F iguro 6 is adiagrammatic view of the operating crank disk in a different position from that shown in Figure 5;

Figure 7 is an elevation of the operating crank disk and its parts;

Figure 8 is a diagrammatic view like Figure 6, but showingthe position taken by the links and the bell cranks whenthe operating pullev h'asmoved through the next succeeding quarter of a revolution;

Figure 9 is an elevation' partly broken away of two sections of one of themoistenlngrmemberg' igure 10 is a sectional view through the trough showing the manner in which a drip apron lor splash pan may berdetachably mounted thereon;

Figure 11 is a fragmentary 'perspective view of'one of the moistening members;

Figure 12 is a fragmentary. perspective `itrxiew of a modified form of moistening mem r; Figure 13 is a detail perspective view of a moistening member like that shown in Figure 12 but slightly` different therefrom; y Figure 14 is a diagrammatic top plan view showing the manner in which the thread or yarn traverses the moistening member and the beveled portions thereof.

Referring to these drawings, it will be seen that I have illustrated a portion of an ordinary winding machine, in which 10 designates generally the frame of the machine. This carries the usual cones 11 driven by means of rollers 12 contacting with the faces of the cones upon which the yarn is wound. Disposed in front of each cone is a guide 13 upon which a traveler 14 is mounted for osoillation. This traveler causes the yarn to traverse the cone 11 from end to end so as to cause the uniform Winding of the yarn upon the cone 1l.' The yarn a, comes from the bobbin 15 which is supported in .any suitable manner upon the machine. So far, I have described so much of an ordinary winding machine such as is commonly used in cotton mills. It will be understood; however, that my mechanism might be applied to any form of winding machine.

My moistening mechanism comprises a trough16 adapted to contain water, Water and oil, or any other desired liquid, this trough being shown as mounted upon brackets 17, which in turn are bolted to a rail 18 forming part of the winding machine and ordinarily found thereon. This trough 16 may be made of any Suitable material. One wall of the trough, isshown as being higher than `the other Wall-l and the front Wall of the trough is shown as rounded, as at 19. This trough may be madeY of metal or wood. The trough has a length equal to the total length of the winding machine and is supplied with Water from any suitable source as, for instance, from the tank 19, the source of supply being such that the water within the trough is always kept atna uniform level.v

Disposed'within this trough 16 are a pair of longitudinally extendlngmolsteuing members 20 and 21. These members may be made of brass, wood, glass, hard fiber, por

celain or any other suitable material. While I do not wish to be limited to the V`particul lar form of the members illustrated, I have or corrugations to preventthe Water from running olf of the moistening member too quickly. Each moistening member is preferably provided with a vent opening 24 at the middle of its horizontal wall. The moistening members have a depth less than the depth of the water in the tank so that each moistening member may be fully submerged. Preferably each moisteningl member is formed of a plurality of sections, as shown in Figure 9, that is, in an ordinary moistening device for the ordinary winding machine each moistening member will be 40 long and formed of, say ten sections each 4C long. The sections are designated b and c in Figure 9. The sections are in alignment with each other and connected for longitudinal move` ment by any suitable means.

I have illustrated for this purpose a latch 25 which at one end extends down through the top wall of the section b and then extends longitudinally in a groove Vin the seetion Z) and has a downwardly extending end 26 which extends through the top wall of the section c. This latch 25 then engages the sections Z) and c for longitudinal 'movel ment but the latch will permit the sections to be readily lifted and removed from the tank one by one. As before remarked, I do not wish to be limited to the specific form of means for holding the sections together for longitudinal movement, as other means might be substituted for the one shown Without departing from the spirit of my invention.

The lower edges of the side walls of each moistening member are formed with the inclined cam faces 27. There is a cam face 27 preferably at the opposite ends of each section b, c, etc., but it will be understood that there might be intermediate cam faces if desired. These cam faces operate against transversely extending ribs 28 formed upon the bottom of the trough, and thus it will be seen that when the moistening member is moved to the left in Figure 4 or to the left in Figure 9, that the caln faces 27 engaging the ribs 28 will cause the moistening membercolnposed of the sections?) and c and the connectedsections to rise loan extent dependent upon the height of the rib 28, and

ythat when the moistening member is moved in the reverse direction it will fall. This is shown in dotted lines in Figure 4. When the moistening member is submerged, the water in the tank will flow over the face of the moistening member and when it is raised some of this Water will be carried up with the moistening member and will be applied to the yarn passing over the upper face thereof.

As beforeremarked, there are a pair of.

is raised into contact with the yarn, the first .the

named moistening member being then depressed. I do not wish to be limited to the mechanism whichI have illustrated forths purpose, as it is obvious that other means mig t be used,rbut I have shown each moistening member as being operatively connected to the depending arm 29 cfa corresponding bell crank 30 mounted upon a transverse shaft 31 supported in brackets upon the trough at one end thereof. Each of these bell cranks has a horizontal arm 32. The depending arm of each bell crank is longitudinally slotted, and a pin 33 engages the walls of the corresponding moistening member and passes through this slot. i

By this means it will be seen oscillation communicated to the bell crank levers will cause areciprocation of the moistening members. The outer ends of the horizontal arms 32 of the bell cranks are connected to respective links 34 and 35. Mounted upon a bracket 36 or in anyother suitable manner is a driving pulley 37 illustratedas mounted` upon a shaft 38.v This driving pulley carries upon it a double crank comprising a crank pin 39 and an arm 40.wl1ich extends diametrically across they face of the pulley 37 this arm at its end carrying` a wrist pin 41. The 'link 34 is formed to provide a head 42 formed with a longitudinally extending slot 43, and the link 35 is formed with a like head 42*l having a longitudinally extending slot 43. The pin 39 passes through the slot in the head 4 2 and the pin 41 passes'through the slot in the head 42. The pulley or disk 37 in rotated in the directionof the arrow by means of a band 44 or by anyrother suitable mechanism and as it rotates it will be obvious from Figuresy5 and 6 that one link will be drawn downward while the other link will be raised by means of a spring 45.

When the pulley 'or disk 3 7 is in the position shown in Figure 6, the pins 39 and 41 are horizontally disposed and both of the moistening members are raised and held raised under theaction of the springs 45,

these springs being shown as being-connected to the depending arm of the respective bell crank levers. As the pin 39 moves downward -it pulls down on 42, thus loweringthecorrespondingmolsteningmembler, but pin 41 rides through the slot of .the

link 42 without effecting the moistener connected thereto, which is o thus kept in its raised sition. On 4thenex't quarter turn Y 42. will simply swing laterally without any effect upon the moistener,ybut the link42 will rise as the pin 41 rises, thus lowering the other moistening 1 member. Thus it will be seen that during one portion of the travel of the disk 37 both the moistening members will be raised. This is the position shwn in Figure 6. yUpon the further movement of the pulley disk 37, one of the moistening members will be lowered, the other remainin4 raised, then the lowered moistening mem r will be raised, and then' theA first named moistening Vmember again lowered. ,Thus there is always `a raised moistening member with which the yarn comes in contact.

lWhile I have illustrated the springs45 as belng applied to the depending arms 29 of the bell crank levers 30, I do not wish to be limited to this,.as they might be' applied to any other part ofthe mechanism and a'ct to urge vthe moistening members in one di,- rection or the other. v

The general operation of this mechanism will be understood from what has one before. The moistening members wi be alternatel raised from the water and immersed 1n the water. When raised they will apply moisture to the yarn to a slight amount. The yarn traveling over the moistenin members receives watertherefrom and -is umformly and ad .uatel moistened. I

have illustrated the p ey3 lasbeing driven by a belt 44 extending over idle pulleys 46 (see Figure l1) and then extending around a horizontal pulley 47 mounted upon a shaft 48, which in turn carries a worm gear 49 driven by a worm shaft 50, this worm shaft constitutm an extension/of the shaft 51 ordinarily pound in machines of this character which carries the main pulley 52 from which` the cone driving means is operated -by a belt'53. The shaft 51, the cone pulleys illustrated, my 'invention consisting not so much in the mechanism employed for securing the raising and lowering ofthe moistening members as in the use of moistening memberswhich are' alternately immersed in the tank and raised therefrom into Contact with the yarn. Moistening members of this 'o character do not collect lint as rollers do,

and furthermore they may be readily cleaned` by the operator wiping them longitudinall? with a rag when the machine is being oiled. Furthermore, there is obviously no danger of the yarn wrapping around the moistening members in case the yarn should break, which the yarn would be liable to do if rollers were used as mointening members.

I have not attempted to illustrate all of the detailed construction of a winding machine,`

thetraverse mechanism. `and yarn mechanism, but it will lbe understoodl that any ofthefordinary means is used for this Pm`lm$-A f It will be noted thatv themoistening members are formed on their side walls with iso outwardly projecting ribs 2()a which engage with the lateral walls of the trough so as to space the moistening members from the walls of the trough. and that the moistening members are provided upon their confronting faces with the spacing ribs so that the moistening members are spaced from each other, thus permitting the ready movement of the moistening members into and out of the water and permitting the water to have free access to the tops of said moistening members.

IVhile I have especially designed this moistening means for use in the conditioning or treating of yarn as it is beingwound in a winding machine. I do not wish to be limited to the use ofithis device with a` winding machine as it might be used with any machine through which yarn is passing and during any period in the treatmentl of the yarn. Thus the yarn may be moistened as it is being wound in hanks or it might be moistened by this means as itis passing to a drum or after it-has passed over the drum of a Slasher or while it is being twisted.

Obviously the device might be used for d veing yarii while the yarn is passing over the trough, the trough, the trough containing dyestutf, this dyes-tuff being applied to the yarn by means of the moistening members.

Preferably a splash pan or drip pan is used with the trough 16 and, as illustrated in Figure 3, this drip pan, which is designated 54, may be made in one piece with the trough. It'will be understood that there is a. drip pan or splash pan between each spindle and corresponding cone. There might, however, be a drip pan extending entirely along beneath all of the ends or yarn threads on the winding machines This drip pan 54 extends te a point just beneath thel small rod on the winder and designated 13 andover which the yarn passes. The yarn passing over the moistening members first comes in conta-ct with this small rod 13 before passing onto the cones. The vi- 'bration of the wet yarn throws oli` some little water just before reaching this rod and this water would ordinarily fall upon the Winder mechanism just below. Furthermore, as the yarn comes from the trough and the yarn comes in contact with the rod 13, water is depositedon this rod and drops from this rod onto the winder. It is to avoid this that I provide the splash pan 54 which catches the water dripping from the rod and also the water dripping from the yarn and carries it back to the trough.

' I do not wish to be limited to this, as the splash plate illustrated in Figure 3 and designated 54 might be a separate piece from the trough. In this case, the spash plate is shown as formed with two flanges or jaws 55 which grip the wall of the trough so as to support the splash plate. This permits the splash plate to be readily removed when the machine is to be cleaned. I do not wish to be limited to any particular design for this splash plate or pan nor to the material of which it is formed, no1' to the manner in which it is mounted, and it is to be understood that the splash plate might be attached to any suitable portion of the winder instead of to the trough and yet be within the purview of this invention.

In Figure 12, I have illustrated a moistening member designated 20", the equivalent of the members 20 or 21, which is U-shaped in cross section, as are the members 20 and 21, but which has certain portions. designated 55 in Figure 12, over which the yarn or thread tra-verses, which portions are rounded at their ends by downwardly and c laterally extending beveled faces 56. The yarn is caused to traverse these faces 55l by the transverse motion of the Winder and the length of this portion 55 is such that the yarn in its traverse will move down onto the beveled face 56 alternately at one end or the other so that any lint which may have collected upon the face 55 over which the yarn moves will be swept off this face 55 at each traverse of the4 yarn in one direction 4or the other and will be carried down upon the inclined face l56. Then as .the moistening member is lowered into the water the inrush of water past or across this beveled face 56 and the notches which form them will wash away this lint.

It will be understood that the angle between the face 55 and the face 56 is not sharp and cutting but that the two faces 55 and 56 mer e into each other and the junction is roun ed and smooth so that the yarn as it travels from right to left or left to right will pass downward and over these rounded edges and onto the beveled face 56, thus discharging lint from the face. 55 over which the yarn traverses. It will be understood that there are as many faces 55 upon thc moistening member'QO or 2l as there are spindles. Openings 5T corresponding to the openings 24 will be iliade in the reversely beveled faces 58 of the notch or groove or at any other point to permit the easy depression of the members into the liquid in the trough. f In Figures 13 and 14, I show a. modified form of the moistening member designated 20 which is substantially like the construction illustrated in Figure 12, but in which these beveled faces 56 are not only beveled downward but the corners or edges are rounded, as at 56, so as to permit the traverse of the yarn with the least possible obstruction. It will be noted also that while the upper face of the moistener conforms, generally speaking, to the plane of travel of the yarn, yet the upper face is also slightly rounded, as shown most clearly in the relatively large views, Figures 11 to 13, so that lll() trough adapted to contain liquid and 'dis-v posed beneath the traveling yarn, a moistening member disposed in the trough, and power operated means for vertically reciproeating the moistening member to cause it to be alternately raised into contact with the yarnfand lowered bodily downward into the liquid in the trough.

2. Yarn moistening means including a trough adapted to contain liquid and be disposed beneath the travelling yarn, applurality of moistening members disposed in the trough and mounted for movement in a plane approximately at` right angles to the yarn, and means for bodily reciprocating each moistening member toward vand fromV the yarn to cause the moistening member to be alternately immersed in the liquid and raised into contact with the yarn, said means including means for holding each moistening member stationary' in contact with the yarn until the. othermoistening member has been brought into contact therewith.

3. Yarn moistening means including a trough adapted to contain liquid and to be disposed beneath the traveling yarn, a plurality of moistening members `disposed in the trough, means for operating each moistening member to cause it-to be alternately immersed inthe liquid and raised into contact with the yarn, said means including means for holding a moistening member in contact with the yarn during the time that the other moistening member is traveling downward into the li uid and raising therefrom into contact wit `the yarn.

4. Yarn moistening means including a trough adapted to contain liquid and to be disposed beneath the traveling yarn, aplurality of longitudinally extending moisten# means for intermittently bodily raising and lowering said moistening members to alter;- nately bring them into contact with the yarn and immerse the moistening members and including means for holding one of said moistening members in contact with vthe yarn until the other moistening member after its immersion has been brought into contact with the yarn.

' 5. Yarn moistening means kincluding a trough adapted to contain liquid and to be ing members mounted `in the trough, and

disposed beneath the traveling yarn, a longitudinally extending moistening member disposed in the trough and having an upper surface'adapted to hold water and at all times disposed in a horizontal plane, and means for alternately raising the moistening member into contact with the yarn and lowering the moistening member to immerse it in the liquid in the trough.

6. Yarn moistening meansv including a trough adapted to contain liquid and to be disposed beneath a traveling yarn, a plural# ity of moistening members disposed in the trough, each of said members consisting of a plurality of longitudinally aligned sections operatively connected to each other for coincident longitudinal movement, cams formed upon the lower edges of said sections, and

means for reciprocating the sections, and

ribs on the bottom of the rvtrough with which the cam faces of the sections are adapted to enga e whereby the moistening members may e raised or lowered.

7. Yarn moistening means including a trough adapted to contain liquid and to be disposed beneath a plurality of traveling yarns, a lurality of moistening members disposed in the trough and extending beneath all ofsaid yarns, each moistening member being formed upon its upper face to retain a small amount of liquid, and means for reciprocating each moisteningmember, the moistening members being formed upon their u nder edges with inclined cam faces and the trough being formed `with ribs upon which said cam faces ride whereby to cause the upward vertical movement of each of said moistening members as it is reciprocated in one direction and the downward movement of each moistening member as it is reciprocated in the other direction.

8. Yarn moistening means including a trough adapted t0 containliquid and to be disposed beneath a plurality of traveling yarns, a. plurality of moistening members disposed in the trough and extending beneath all of said yarns, each moistening member being formed upon its upper face to retain a small amountV of liquid, and means for 'reciprocating each moistening member being formed upon theirl under edges with inclined cam faces and the 'trough being formed with ribs upon which said cam faces ride whereby to cause the upward vertical movement of each of said moistening= membersv as it is reciprocated inI one direction and thevdownward movement of each moistening memberas it is reciprocated in the-other direction, the operating means for the moistening members including means for holding one' of said members raised into contact withtheyarn until the other member has been raised into contact with the yarn and then lowering the first 130 named member.-

9. Yarn moistening means including a trough adapted to contain liquid and to be disposed beneath a plurality of traveling yarns, a pair of moistening members disposed in the trough, each moistening member having an upper corrugated face adapted to retain a small amount of liquid, and constantly operated means for bodily alternately raising and lowering each moistening member into contact with the yarn and including means 'for holding each one of said members in contact with the yarn until the other moistening member has been raised into contact with the yarn.

10. Yarn moistening means including a trough adapted to contain liquid and to extend longitudinally beneath a series of traveling yarns, a pair of moistening members disposed in the trough and held spaced from the sides thereof and from each other, each of said moistening members having the foi-in in cross section of an inverted U to provide depending side walls, each of said side walls having a series of cam faces formed thereon, a series of ribs carried by the trough with which said cam faces are adapted to engage, and power operated means for reciprocating said moistening members to canse them to rise from the liquid in the trough into contact with the yarn or to move away from the yarn and be immersed in liquid in the trough, said means including means for holding each one of said moistening members in contact with the yarn until the other moistening member has risen into contact. with the yarn.

11. Yarn moistening means including a trough adapted to contain liquid and to be disposed beneath the traveling yarn, a longitudinally extending moistening member disposed in the trough, and means for. alternately raising the moistening member into contact with the yarn and lowering the moisteninY member to immerse it in the li uid in the trough, the moistening member being formed with a portion over which the yarn passes, this portion having a face equal in length to the traverse of the yarn, the ends of this portion being downwardly and laterally beveled.

12. The combinatitoin with a yarn winding machine, a. member on which the yarn is wound and a traveler reciprocating in front of said member and acting as a guide for the yarn, of a trough extending longitudinally beneath the yarn, a moistening member mounted in the trough and adapted to be alternately raised into contact with the yarn and lowered out of contact therewith and immersed in the liquid in the trough, and means for alternately raising and lowering the moistening member, the moistening I member being formed with a face over which the yarn in its traverse passes, this face having a length substantially equal to the transverse traverse of the'yarn, this face being rounded at its ends by downwardly and laterally extending faces merging into -the first named face and upon which the yarn in its traverse passes.

13. The combination with a yarn winding machine, a member on which the yarn is wound and a traveler reciprocating in front of said member and acting as a guide for the yarn, of a trough extending longitudinally beneath the yarn, a moistening member mounted in the trough and adapted to be alternately raised into contact with the-yarn and lowered out of Vcontact', therewith and immersed in the liquid in the trough, and means for alternately raising and lowering the moistening member, the moistening meniber being foi-ined with a face over which the yarn iii its traverse passes, this face having a. length substantially equal to the transverse traverse of the yarn, this face being rounded at its endsv by downwardly and laterally extending faces merging into -the first named face and, upon which the yarn in its traverse passes, these inclined faces being rounded at their junction with the forward and rear faces of the moistening member. a

14. The combination in, a winding machine, of a member upon which the yarn is to be wound, means disposed immediately beneath said member forA O'iving a traverse to the yarn, of a trough disposed immediately beneath the traveling yarn, a plurality of independently movable moistening members disposed in the trough, means for operating each moistening member to cause it to be alternately -immersed into the liquid and raised into contact with the yarn, and a splash pan extending from one wall of the trough to a point beneath the means upon which the yarn is wound to receive the drippings therefrom. n

15. The combination in a winding machine, of a member upon which the yarn is to be wound, means disposed immediately beneath said member for giving a traverse to the yarn, of a trough disposed immediately beneath the traveling yarn, a plurality of independently movable moistening menibers disposed in the trough, means for operating each moistening member to cause it to be alternately immersed into the liquid and raised into contact with the yarn, and a splash pan extending from one wall of the trough to a point beneath the means upon which the yarn is wound to receive the drippings therefrom, said splash pan being carried by the trough.

In testimony whereof I hereunto affix my signature.

JAMES A. JOHNSON

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2750780 *Jun 18, 1952Jun 19, 1956Ind Rayon CorpThread advancing reel having liquid applicator and wiper
US4912948 *Mar 22, 1985Apr 3, 1990Union Carbide Chemicals And Plastics Company Inc.Vacuum guide used in flexible sheet material treatment
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/200, 118/DIG.190
International ClassificationB65H71/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65H71/007, Y10S118/19, B65H2701/31
European ClassificationB65H71/00D