Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1534353 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 21, 1925
Filing dateApr 19, 1923
Priority dateApr 19, 1923
Publication numberUS 1534353 A, US 1534353A, US-A-1534353, US1534353 A, US1534353A
InventorsBesser Herman
Original AssigneeBesser Herman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fractured block and method of making the same
US 1534353 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

-FRACTURED BLOCK AND METHOD OF MAKlNG THE SAME "Filed April 19, 1923 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 He rman B esser AT TOR/V5175 April 21, 1.925 1,534,353 I H. BESSER FRACTURED BLOCK AND METHOD OF MAKLNG THE SAME Filed April 19, 1925 I 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 vli f/VVENTOR Herman Besser A TTORNEYS Patented Apr. 21, 1925.

UNITED STATES HERMAN IBESSER, OF ALZPEN A, MICHIGAN.

rmc'ruann BLOCK AND METHOD or MAKING rim sma- Application filed April 19, 1923. Serial No. 633,106.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, HERMAN BESSER, a

' resident of the city of Alpena, county of Alpena, and State of Michigan, and a citi zen of the United States ofrAmerica, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Fractured Blocks and Methods of Making the Same, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to artificial building blocks of an especially ornamental character, and the method of making the same. It relates particularly to fractured blocks presenting a highly ornamental surface. My blocks are to be molded from concrete material or some composition containing concrete, by which I mean a cement mixture of earthy materials.

It is an object of my invention to make building blocks having a thick facing of highly ornamental material which has resulted from fracture of a thicker molded layer, and a main or rear portion or layer I of concrete of the usual composition for such blocks. In any case, the blocks are to be made up of layers or strata of quite different composition or mixture.

It is a further object of my invention to make artificial blocks of molded material in strata of different compositions, certain ofv which have a rlchness of cementlower than that of the others whereby the block unit may be fractured when hard and yet positively direct the plane of fracture in the weaker strata.

Another object of the invention is to effect the operation of fracturing the layer after the complete setting in the molded form. This is regarded as very'important since it gives to the fractured surface or face an ornamental appearance not heretofore attained to .my knowledge. Fracture of such molded blocks has generally been done while green, as this was thought necessary to direct the line of fracture where intended.

It is an especial object of my invention -to incorporate in one or more strata of a molded n'iass smallbodies by mixing together such bodies as pebbles or pieces of crushed granite or marble with the usual cement and water, the bodies used having a weaker cohesive force than the adhesive force between the same and the surrounding concrete, and fracturing the resulting layer after curing thereby splitting the said bodies of. the mixture lying in the plane of fracture, thus presenting a fractured surface on the block having split pebbles or other small bodies with clean unspotted faces.

With these and other objects of my invention described in the accompanying pages and illustrated in the drawings herein referred to and pointed out in the ap pended claims, more detailed description of the method disclosed, including the various steps used, and the resulting product will now be revealed. v 1 In the drawings illustrating my invent1on,--

Figure 1 is a perspective View of a com pleted block made by my method;

Figure'2 is a perspectiveof' a portion of a block mold filled withplastic material in the manner I propose using, a vertical, transverse section being shown through mold and contents; I

Figure 3 is a ,perspective of the molded block as removed from the position shown in Fig. 2, and as the operation offr'acturing is being performed;

Figure 4 shows a perspective View of part of the block after fracture, the fractured face being the upper surface in this view;

Figure 5 is a perspective View of two blocks of modified form, though desi ned to be made by my method herein descri ed;

Figure 6 is a view similar to Fig. 5, of a second modification;

Figure 7 is a plan View of a block after molding, but before fracture, this view showing a further modification;

Figure 8 is a perspective of a further modified application of my general method of manufacture, and

Figure 9 "is a perspective of a corner block made by my new method.

My method of manufacture is designed to form a block of different forms of material, and especially of more than one quality of material, one of which shall be of particularly ornamental character and shall, by making according to my method, expose to th external surface of a wall in which such blocks are laid, a fractured surface of the especially ornamental material, and one in which small stones of rare beauty shall have been split in the general plane of fracture thereby exposing a jeweled surface of great brilliance, and not to my knowledge attained by methods heretofore used. One great bluish or of a purple shade.

weakness in the fracturing step of block manufacture heretofore used was the practice of producing fracture while the block was still green, at least not fully hardened. The result could never therefore have the beauty and especially the brilliance of surfaces which could be attained by fracture of fully hardened material which had been cured before fracture.

To accomplish the desired result and produce the effect designed artificially, it is necessary to mold the material with care,

and it is my purpose to mold a block of larger depth than the final product, so that the plane of fracture shall be transverse of the depth of the mold as here shown in the molding view. In my first form of embodiment of my invention, a deep mold A is set up but one end of the mold being shown in the view in Fig.2) here shown as supported on the usual form of pallet B. Concrete material is then poured into and tamped down in the bottom of the mold to a height equal to about one third the depth of the mold. Then an entirely different character of material from that at the bottom is poured in upon the first layer. Marble or granite in suitable mixture with concrete has been found by me very suitable for the purpose of this intermediate layer, it being found in various colors and having therein many small pebbles of the approximate size of peas or even larger, some being brown, or even fiery red, while others are gray and In some casesit may be found advisable to crush marble or granite of the desired shade to the desired size of particles in a stone crusher, and such particles resulting from, said crushing are intended to be included in the terms pebbles and bodies hereafter used in this description of method. The composition of this intermediate layer in molding the original block, if three layers are used, is of a concrete rich in cement which holds embedded therein the solid bodies-the pebbles before referred to. In the drawings the numeral 10 represents the concrete layers both in the mold and in the finished product; 11 designates the intermediate layer of the mixed concrete and granite composition, the pebbles or solid bodies bound therein being designated by 12.

Care is taken in molding all these materials to make the concrete layers 10 of the most durable character, so that the cohesive force thereof will be the maximum possible. Further, the line of division 13 between layers 10 and 11 is purposely made irregular so that the demarcation line shall not present too abrupt a line of cleavage in material that might possibly be weaker in adhesive force than the cohesion in the layer 11. It is quite essential that these layers shall be gradually united, one fading into the other,

so that when fracture occurs, it will not follow line 13.

It is also important that the adhesive force of the layer 11 shall be made very strong, in fact, after curing these blocks prior to fracture, it is possible to attain a strength of adhesion between the pebbles and the concrete in which they are imbedded 1n this layer 11 that is even greater than the cohesive force of the particles in bodies 12 before referred to. Such strength of adhesion can only be attained by using a composition sufficiently rich in cement and by a longer period of remaining in molded form undisturbed. This step of hardening or curing prior to fracture I regard as very important and cannot be too strongly emphasized.

When, 'now, the block has fully set, it is then fractured along the line 25, resulting in two blocks, if the first form of molding is used, each having a deep concrete base and a shallower granite layer presenting a fractured face having split pebbles thereon for the wall surface. The cohesive force in the pebbles being weaker than the adhesion between the pebbles and the binding agent or concrete, a splitting or breaking force di rected transverse to the granite part of the block will cause fracture along the approximately shortest line, and any pebbles lying in this plane will themselves be split, for the reasons above given. Fracture cannot therefore result in cleavage between pebbles and concrete, and pebbles on said line will not protrude from the otherwise smooth face of the fracture. This feature is of great importance and adds greatly to the value of the finished product, andone which has not to my knowledge been attained heretofore. These split pebbles in the actual plane of fracture of the block present faces that .are entirely clean and free from any cement or other foreign material. Second, it is to be observed that many different designs can be produced by the opportunity afforded by this condition. By inserting different kinds and in natural colors of granite or marble, and other kinds of pebbles of different sizes, if desired, or in mixtures of various kinds of these materials, many different face designs and effects are possible and contemplated.

While for the reasons given above I have been able to quite positively direct the line of fracture where desired without especial provision of means for the purpose, I may direct this line still more certainly by further weakening the block at the point intended by molding it with a groove on either side, and this is shown in Fig. 2 by providing the inner faces of the side plates of the mold with strips of the shape in cross section which is the counterpart of the groove desired. The strips 14 in said view are wedge-shaped and triangular producing thereby a triangular-shaped groove in the molded block. This groove 15 serves further to receive and guide the tool for splitting, if it is used for the purpose.

A preferred manner of fracturing the composite block is to direct a sharp tool 16 somewhat wider than the usual chisel at right .angles to the side face of the block and against the granite layer thereof, inserting its edge in the groove, if such is provided, and striking its handle 17 a sharp blow when the block will be broken readily and on a plane quite level and smooth. In the view shown in Fig. 3, the block while being broken is supported on a block 18, but this particular form of support is not essential.

The result of this fracture is a block shown in Fig. 1 as a block of two materials, the rear portion 10 being of concrete'only and the face 19 designed to form the surface .of the finished wall having a granite face with split pebbles 12 appearing over its-surface and affording. a rock face that reflects the light rays atVarying angles and thus presenting a sparkling and jewelled appearance which is highlyprnamental. The groove 15 having been dividedby the block fracture, the final block will have a beveled edge as designated by'20.

By making the strips 14 of other shapes including ornamental curves, the edges 20- may be changed to corresponding curved edges as 21 and.23 in Figs. 5 and 6. These views also show some of the man designs possible by laying finished blocks a ove each other with two such curved edges together,

giving the ornamental effect shown at 22 and 24.

. Summarizing some of the conditions in related layers and parts of the block to be manufactured, it may be again stated that the pebble facing material 11.must be rich enough in cement so that when properly compacted into blocks and set, the voids between the pebble bodies which are filled with cement will be stronger andv tougher than the pebbles themselves, so that in the method of manufacturing, the plane of fracture, by following the line of least resistance, will go right through the pebbles and not around them, and'thus show up the beautiful clean fra'cturesdhrough the pebbles.

Further, the concrete material 10 other than that containing the facing pebbles, being the majorv portion of the block, will be of still richer cement contents than the facing material 11, so that when the block is fully cured, the former will be stronger and tougher than 11 and thereby prevent the line of fracture from going outside of the layer 11 containing the pebble bodies bound therein.

Observance of these conditions and acting in conformity with the same, will always avoid any difliculty in controlling the line of fracture where it is desired. The grooves 15 assist in this function, but are not wholly essential.

The frames A may be removed from the molded blocks soon after filling with the material, though this is more or less a matter of choice, but'the blocks are then allowed to set for some time-until fully ripened. No exact period is stated, though it hasbeen found quite suitable to let them mature for a month, or even longer, before fracturing.

Other slight changes may be made in the method of making the blocks here described. For example, but. two layers of different material may be used, as in Fig. 7 I have shown a layer of ordinary concrete 10 and an outer layef 11, the latter having protuberanc'es 27 which are chipped off after maturing, the fracture plane 26 splitting through the pebbles 12 as in the other forms. This outer layer 11 may be molded on the ends as well as the side, as this view shows.

In some cases it may be desirable to make corner blocks by molding four portions 10" of the concrete and a cross-like inner portion.of the granite layers 11", using if desired, the bevels 14 and 14 to produce the grooves 15 and 15 whereby cross fractures may be effected after maturing, splitting the intervening pebbles as in the other forms, but making four blocks in this case. Fig. 8 shows the molding step, and Fig. 9 the corner perspective of one block after fracture in which 19 designates the faces and 20 the bevels, as in the other forms.

Neither do I limit myself to the exact materials specified, but include within the terms named all other compositions that may well fall within the generic scope of the terms and phrases employed.

I claim,-

1. The method of making artificial building blocks, comprising molding in an integral mass rich concrete material having imbedded therein brittle bodies of material contrasting with their surrounding concrete. allowing the block to fully harden, then fracturing the same transversely of its face, said line of fracture splitting the bodies which it intersects.

2. The method of making artificial building blocks comprising, molding in an integral mass rich concrete material having block to fully curein its original molded condition, then fracturing the same on a transverse plane connecting the said external grooves, whereby two blocks are formed each having on oneface a broken surface with split pebbles thereon.

4. The method of making artificial hardened blocks for building purposes, comprising molding in a unitary mass rich con crete material having imbedded therein pebbles of granite material having weaker cohesive force than the adhesive force between the pebbles and the surrounding concrete material, allowing the entire material to thoroughly dry and harden, then fracturing the same on a plane transverse thereof and intersecting certain of said pebbles, thereby forming two blocks of which the fractured surfaces constitute the faces with=split pebbles thereon.

5. The method of making artificial hardened blocks for building purposes, comprising molding in a unitary mass rich concrete material having imbedded therein pebbles of granite material and having grooves in its outer faces, permitting the block-to fully cure in its original molded condition, then fracturing the same on a transverse plane connecting the said external grooves b y tapping the line of one of the said grooves with a. sharp tool, whereby two blocks are formed each having on one face a broken surface with split pebbles thereon.

6. The method of making artificial building blocks, comprising molding in an integral mass earthy cement therein bodies contrasting with their surrounding binder and having weaker cohesive force than the adhesive force between said bodies and the surrounding cement material, permitting the block to fully harden, then fracturing the same transversely through the block thereby splitting the bodies which the fracture plane intersects.

7. The method of making artificial hardened blocks for building purposes, comprising molding in a unitary mass concrete material having imbedded therein pebbles of granite, permitting the block to' fully harden, then fracturing the same on a trans verse plane through the block, whereby two blocks are formed each having on one face a broken surface with split pebbles thereon.

8. The method of making artificial hardened blocks for building purposes. com prising molding in a unitary mass rich concrete material having imbedded therein pebbles of granite material having weaker cohesive force than the adhesive force between the pebbles and the surrounding concrete material, allowing the entire material to material, bonding by thoroughly dry and harden, then fracturing the same on a plane transverse thereof and intersecting certain of said pebbles, thereby forming at least one block of which one or more fractured surfaces constitute faces with split pebbles thereon.

9. The method of making artificial hardened blocks for building purposes, comprising molding in a unitary mass a layer of rich concrete material and an adjacent layer of concrete material having imbedded therein pebbles of granite material, permitting the composite block to fully harden, then fracturing the same transversely through said adjacent layer thereby splitting the pebbles which the plane of fracture 1ntersects.

ened blocks for building purposes, comprising molding in a unitary mass outer layers of rich concrete material and an intermediate layer of concrete material having imbedded therein pebbles of granite material, permitting the composite block to fully harden, then fracturing the same transversely through said intermediate layer thereby splitting the pebbles which the plane of fracture intersects.

11. The method of making artificial building blocks, comprising molding in an integral. mass outer layers of rich concrete material and an intermediate layer of concrete material having imbedded therein bodies of material contrasting with their surrounding bonding concrete, permitting the composite block to fully harden, then fracturing the same transversely of said intermediate layer, said line of fracture splitting the bodies which it intersects.

12. The method of making artificial building blocks, comprising molding in an in tegral mass outer layers of rich concrete material and an intermediate layer of concrete material having imbedded therein bodies of material contrasting with their surrounding bonding concrete, permitting the composite block to fully harden, then fracturing the same transversely of said in termediate layer, by tapping the side face thereof by a sharp tool, said line of fracture splitting the bodies which it intersects.

13. The method of making artificial hardened blocks for building purposes, compris ing molding in a unitary mass outer layers of rich concrete material and an intermediate layer of concrete material having imbedded therein pebbles of granite material, permitting the composite block to fullymature or harden, then fracturing the same on a trans-- verse plane through-the intermediate layer and midway between said outer layers, whereby two blocks are formed each having on one face a broken surface with split pebbles thereon.

14. The method of making artificial build- 10. The method of making artificial harding blocks, comprising molding in an integral mass an intermediate layer of earthy material bonding by cement therein bodies contrasting with their surrounding binder and having weaker cohesive force than the adhesive force between said bodies and-the surrounding cement material, and outer layers of earthy material richer in cement than the intermediate layer, permitting the composite block to fully harden, then fracturing the same transversely through said intermediate layer thereby splitting the bodies which the line of fracture intersects.

15. The method of making artificial building blocks, comprising molding in a unitary mass outer layers of rich concrete material and an intermediate layer ofconcrete material having imbedded therein pebbles of granite material and having grooves in its outer faces midway between the said outer layers of concrete, permitting the composite block to fully cure in its original molded condition, then fracturing the same on a transverse plane connecting the said external grooves, whereby two blocks are formed each having on one face a broken surface with split pebbles thereon.

16. The method of making artificial building blocks, comprising molding in an integral mass an intermediate layer of concrete material onding therein bodies of material contrasting with their surrounding binder and having weaker cohesive force than the adhesiveforce between said bodies and the surrounding concrete, and outer layers of concrete material richer incement than the intermediate layer, ermitting the composite block to fully har en, then fracturing the same transversely through said intermediate layer thereby splitting the bodies which the plane of fracture intersects.

17. A concrete building block having on one face thereof a surface of concrete material having bonded therein pebbles split in the plane of said surface.

18. A concrete building block having for a wall face a surface in which appear spaced pebbles split in the plane of said surface.

surface in which appear spaced pebble bodies split in the plane of said surface fracture. j

In testimony whereof I hereunto afi ix my signature.

HERMAN Basset.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2445210 *Dec 4, 1945Jul 13, 1948Johns ManvilleManufacture of fibro-cementitious sheets
US2633013 *Jun 12, 1948Mar 31, 1953Callan Patrick JConcrete wall with a simulated face
US2648115 *Jun 14, 1952Aug 11, 1953Michael D MaramonteBlock molding machine
US2896299 *Aug 13, 1956Jul 28, 1959Hemb Harald BApparatus for molding tongue and groove concrete slabs
US3015192 *Apr 4, 1955Jan 2, 1962Vermiculite Mfg CoBrick package and method of making same
US3350757 *Mar 19, 1964Nov 7, 1967Bowles Arnold GApparatus for the manufacture of brick and tile
US3756216 *Apr 29, 1971Sep 4, 1973Flechter H CoMethod for cutting stone with pressure operated means
US3873402 *Feb 22, 1973Mar 25, 1975Buchtal GmbhCeramic tiles
US4335549 *Dec 1, 1980Jun 22, 1982Designer Blocks, Inc.Method, building structure and side-split block therefore
US4738059 *Jan 31, 1986Apr 19, 1988Designer Blocks, Inc.Split masonry block, block wall construction, and method therefor
US4981539 *Jan 19, 1989Jan 1, 1991Luca ToncelliProcess for the structural reinforcement of fragile articles made of stone or agglomerates
US5078940 *May 31, 1990Jan 7, 1992Sayles Jerome DMethod for forming an irregular surface block
US5217630 *Nov 27, 1991Jun 8, 1993Sayles Jerome DApparatus for forming an irregular surface block
US5879603 *Nov 8, 1996Mar 9, 1999Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Process for producing masonry block with roughened surface
US5887399 *Aug 4, 1997Mar 30, 1999Shaw; Lee A.Decorative wall and method of fabrication
US5950394 *Dec 30, 1997Sep 14, 1999Shaw; Lee A.Method of fabricating decorative wall
US6029943 *Feb 28, 1997Feb 29, 2000Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Splitting technique
US6050255 *Jan 30, 1998Apr 18, 2000Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Splitter blade assembly and station
US6082057 *Nov 8, 1996Jul 4, 2000Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Splitting technique
US6082074 *Jun 15, 1998Jul 4, 2000Shaw; Lee A.Method of fabricating layered decorative wall
US6112487 *Sep 18, 1998Sep 5, 2000Shaw; Lee A.Decorative wall and method of fabrication
US6113379 *Jul 2, 1998Sep 5, 2000Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Process for producing masonry block with roughened surface
US6138983 *Nov 23, 1998Oct 31, 2000Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Mold for producing masonry block with roughened surface
US6145266 *Nov 17, 1998Nov 14, 2000Best Block CompanyVertical and horizontal belt masonry system
US6178704Jul 1, 1999Jan 30, 2001Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Splitting technique
US6224815Jul 10, 2000May 1, 2001Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Process for producing masonry block with roughened surface
US6557818 *Sep 28, 2000May 6, 2003Redi-Rock International, LlcForm for manufacturing concrete retaining wall blocks
US6609695Feb 5, 2001Aug 26, 2003Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Mold for producing masonry block with roughened surface
US6854702Jan 7, 2003Feb 15, 2005Redi-Rock International, LlcForm for manufacturing concrete blocks for freestanding walls
US6874494Mar 20, 2002Apr 5, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US6877283Mar 28, 2001Apr 12, 2005Susumu YoshiwaraManufacture and use of earthquake resistant construction blocks
US6886551Apr 10, 2003May 3, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US6918715Jun 19, 2001Jul 19, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US6964272Apr 2, 2004Nov 15, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7004158Feb 14, 2005Feb 28, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7066167Jan 6, 2005Jun 27, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7146974Sep 13, 2004Dec 12, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7428900Jul 28, 2005Sep 30, 2008Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7670081Jan 17, 2008Mar 2, 2010Lithocrete, Inc.Method of forming surface seeded particulate
US7766002Oct 18, 2006Aug 3, 2010Pavestone Company, L.P.Concrete block splitting and pitching apparatus
US7849656 *Apr 18, 2008Dec 14, 2010Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Dry cast block arrangement and methods
US7870853Feb 13, 2008Jan 18, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7967001Nov 23, 2010Jun 28, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US8006683Oct 29, 2007Aug 30, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US8028688Oct 18, 2006Oct 4, 2011Pavestone Company, LlcConcrete block splitting and pitching apparatus and method
US8136325Oct 20, 2005Mar 20, 2012Van Lerberg David PLandscaping wall structure and form
US8136516Aug 2, 2010Mar 20, 2012Pavestone, LLCConcrete block splitting and pitching apparatus
US8251053Dec 14, 2010Aug 28, 2012Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US8291669Apr 8, 2008Oct 23, 2012Pavestone Company, LlcInterlocking structural block and method of manufacture
US8327833Mar 25, 2011Dec 11, 2012Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US8464481 *Apr 21, 2010Jun 18, 2013E. Dillon & CompanySegmental retaining wall corner block
US8763599Oct 18, 2006Jul 1, 2014Pavestone, LLCMasonry block multi-splitting apparatus and method
US8962088Mar 15, 2013Feb 24, 2015Lithocrete, Inc.Method and finish for concrete walls
US9038346Jun 17, 2013May 26, 2015E. Dillon & CompanySegmental retaining wall corner block and wall corner comprised of corner blocks
US9102079Aug 29, 2013Aug 11, 2015Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US9267284Feb 11, 2014Feb 23, 2016Lithocrete, Inc.Decorative concrete and method of installing the same
US9487951Oct 27, 2015Nov 8, 2016Shaw & Sons, Inc.Architectural concrete wall and method of forming the same
US9573293Sep 14, 2012Feb 21, 2017Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US9580915Jan 19, 2016Feb 28, 2017Lithocrete, Inc.Decorative concrete and method of installing the same
US9695602Oct 14, 2015Jul 4, 2017Shaw & Sons, Inc.Architectural concrete and method of forming the same
US9701046Jun 20, 2014Jul 11, 2017Pavestone, LLCMethod and apparatus for dry cast facing concrete deposition
US20030160147 *Mar 7, 2003Aug 28, 2003Manthei James A.Method for casting concrete retaining wall blocks
US20040004310 *Jun 20, 2003Jan 8, 2004Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Process for producing masonry block with roughened surface
US20040041295 *Sep 2, 2003Mar 4, 2004Shaw Lee A.Method of forming surface seeded particulate
US20040098928 *Nov 25, 2002May 27, 2004Scherer Ronald JamesBlock roughening assembly and method
US20040128933 *Jul 31, 2003Jul 8, 2004Skidmore David A.Masonry units with a mortar buffer
US20040200468 *Apr 10, 2003Oct 14, 2004Scherer Ronald J.Block splitting assembly and method
US20040221545 *Apr 2, 2004Nov 11, 2004Scherer Ronald J.Block splitting assembly and method
US20050115555 *Jan 6, 2005Jun 2, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20050145300 *Feb 14, 2005Jul 7, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20050268901 *Jul 28, 2005Dec 8, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20060054154 *Sep 13, 2004Mar 16, 2006Scherer Ronald JBlock splitting assembly and method
US20060062015 *Aug 12, 2005Mar 23, 2006Du-Hwan ChungRadiant pad for display device, backlight assembly and flat panel display device having the same
US20060083591 *Dec 6, 2005Apr 20, 2006Shaw Lee AMethod of forming surface seeded particulate
US20060169270 *Dec 7, 2005Aug 3, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20070104538 *Dec 20, 2006May 10, 2007Shaw Lee AMethod of forming surface seeded particulate
US20070277471 *Jun 6, 2006Dec 6, 2007Gibson Sidney TBrick/block/paver unit and method of production therefor
US20080092869 *Oct 18, 2006Apr 24, 2008Pavestone Company, L.P.Masonry block multi-splitting apparatus and method
US20080092870 *Oct 18, 2006Apr 24, 2008Pavestone Company, L.P.Concrete block splitting and pitching apparatus and method
US20080096471 *Oct 18, 2006Apr 24, 2008Pavestone Company, L.P.Concrete block splitting and pitching apparatus and method
US20080112757 *Jan 17, 2008May 15, 2008Shaw Lee AMethod of forming surface seeded particulate
US20080163575 *Nov 21, 2007Jul 10, 2008Pratt Daniel JMasonry block and associated methods
US20090249734 *Apr 8, 2008Oct 8, 2009Karau William HInterlocking Structural Block and Method of Manufacture
US20090260314 *Apr 18, 2008Oct 22, 2009Mugge Jimmie LDry cast block arrangement and methods
US20100111604 *Jan 13, 2010May 6, 2010Shaw Lee AMethod of forming surface seeded particulate
US20100180528 *Jan 21, 2009Jul 22, 2010Shaw Ronald DDecorative concrete and method of installing the same
US20100263310 *Apr 21, 2010Oct 21, 2010Wauhop Billy JSegmental retaining wall corner block, method of manufacturing corner block and wall corner comprised of corner blocks
US20100313868 *Aug 2, 2010Dec 16, 2010William Howard KarauConcrete block splitting and pitching apparatus and method
US20110005157 *Sep 20, 2010Jan 13, 2011Pratt Daniel JMasonry Block and Associated Methods
US20110061640 *Nov 23, 2010Mar 17, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20110168152 *Mar 25, 2011Jul 14, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20140272284 *Mar 15, 2013Sep 18, 2014David M. FrankeMulti zone cementitious product and method
USD445512Oct 27, 1997Jul 24, 2001Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Retaining wall block
USD458693Nov 8, 1996Jun 11, 2002Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Retaining wall block
USD773693Mar 23, 2015Dec 6, 2016Pavestone, LLCFront face of a retaining wall block
USD791346Oct 21, 2015Jul 4, 2017Pavestone, LLCInterlocking paver
EP0316653A2 *Nov 2, 1988May 24, 1989SF-Vollverbundstein-Kooperation GmbHConcrete palisade and process and apparatus for its manufacture
EP0316653A3 *Nov 2, 1988Jun 28, 1989SF-Vollverbundstein-Kooperation GmbHConcrete palisade and process and apparatus for its manufacture
WO2007140586A1 *Jun 4, 2007Dec 13, 2007Sidney Gibson LimitedBrick/block/paver unit and method of production therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/315, 264/157, 52/98, 264/DIG.570, 264/256, 125/1, 425/DIG.109, 52/97
International ClassificationB28B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationB28B17/0027, Y10S425/109, Y10S264/57
European ClassificationB28B17/00D