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Publication numberUS1537248 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 12, 1925
Filing dateDec 13, 1923
Priority dateDec 13, 1923
Publication numberUS 1537248 A, US 1537248A, US-A-1537248, US1537248 A, US1537248A
InventorsMaloney Thomas J
Original AssigneeMaloney Thomas J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Internal-combustion engine
US 1537248 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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Patent ed May 12, 1925. I

UNITED STATES worms :1. MALONEY, or DENVER, cotoaano.

INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE.

'Application flled December 13, 1923. Serial No. 680,371.

To all whom it'may comem:

Be it known that I, THOMAS J. MALONEY,

' -a citizen of the United States, residing at Denver, in the city and county of Denver and State of Colorado, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Internal-Combustion Engines; and I do declare the follo vingto be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to 'make and use the same, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the .characters of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification.

This inventionrelates to improvements in the construction of internal combustion engines.

' The internal combustion engine, as ordinarily constructed, is rovided with intake and exhaust valves of t e poppet type, which are held in closed position by means of springs and opened by means of cams. This type of valve has many objectionable features, but is employed mainly because it is simple and inexpensive. Poppet valves are hard to keep clean and tight because carbon particles have an excellent opportunity to lodge between the seat and the valve. The most serious objection to the poppet valve is that it does not permit a sufliciently large opening to be formed to allow the explosive mixture to enter and the exhaust gases to leave with. suflicient freedom to permit the engine to rotate at as high a speed as it could otherwise attain. In order to overcome the defects pointed out, ithas been proposed to substitute for the poppet valves slide valves of various types and even rotary valves have been suggested.

It is the object of this invention to produce a valve mechanism that is sim le and can also be readily applied to engines of ordinary amount of alteration.

My invention, briefly described, consists in a cylinderhead adapted to be secured to the top of an engine block of ordinary construction. This cylinder head is hollow and has a horizontal partition which is double and between the two parts of which are located two cooperating slides'which serve to open and close the ports leading from the intake and the exhaust manifolds to the cylinders. These slides are reciprocated by means of eccentrics and open and close the various construction without a great parts in a predetermined sequence.- That portion of the cylinderhead above the slides is divided into an intake and an exhaust manifoldor chamber and the portion below the slides is provided with chambers through which the cooling liquid circulates.

My invention can be best described and most readily understood when reference is had to the accompanying drawings in which the present preferred embodiment is shown, and in which:

' Fig. 1 is aside elevation of an engine constructed in accordance with my present invention, parts thereof being broken away to better disclose the construction;

Fig. 2 is a section taken on lines Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is asection taken on line 3-3, Fig. 1;,and I Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic representation showing the slides in the positions which they occupy for each stroke of the engine.

The same reference characters will be employed to represent the same parts throughout the several views.

Numeral 1 designates an ordinary engine or cylinder block having four cylindrical chambers 1, 2, 3 and 4 surrounded by awater jacket 5. Within the cylinders are pistons 6 operatively connected by rods 7 to the crank shaft 8, all as is common and .well known. A vertical shaft 9 is driven from the crank" shaft by means of suitable timing gears and has secured thereto'eccentrics 10 and 11, the former of which leads the.

latter b an angleof 90 degrees. The cylinderhea is hollow and has a double wall extending horizontally thereof. Thiswall has an upper portion 12 and a lower portion 13. Above the wall 12 there is a longitudinal vertical wall 14 which divides this space into an intake chamber I and an exhaust chamber E.

The intake chamber I may, if desired, be

divided into several compartments by t'ra'nsverse walls 15 in the manner shown on the drawing. The c linderhead has a water jacket 16 surroan ing the same, in the manner shown,- but as this has nothing to do with my invention, I will not describe the same, but shall devote myself to a description of the valves and valve-operating mechanism.

From both the inta e and the exhaust chambers, port openings 17 extend through both of the walls 12 and 13 and side walls 18 extend from the wall 13 to the upper edge inder 4. Position 3 shows of the cylinder walls in the manner shown in Fig. 1.

Between the walls 12 and 13 are two slides, the upper of which I have designated by the numeral 19 and the lower by numeral 20. These slides are provided with perforations spaced in the manner shown in Fig. 4 where the circles marked 1, 2, 3 and 4 represent the cylindersof the engine and the dotted lines indicate the location of the-port openings 17. In Fig. 2 I have shown a' connecting rod 21, which operatively connects the slide 19 with eccentric 10. A similar rod connects slide 20 with the eccentric 11. The shaft 9 rotates in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 1 and this causes a counter-clockwise rotation of the cams or equivalent parts in Fig. 4. Cam 10 leads cam 11 by 90 degrees.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 4, it will be noticed that I have shown four different positions of the slides, position 1 showing the intake open to cylinder 1 and the exhaust port open from cylinder 3. The shaded rectangles indicate the open ports. Position 2 shows the intake port open to cylinder 3 and the exhaust port from cylthe intake open into cylinder 4 and the exhaust openfromi cylinder 2, while position 4: shows the intake open to cylinder 2 and the exhaust from cylinder 1. The four positionsshown complete the cycle. The wall 13 is in contact with the cooling water on its lower side and is thereby1 prevented from reaching an excessively igh temperature.

lVith the type of valve described by me and operated by eccentrics or equivalent cams, there are no intermittently movable parts as in an engine employing poppet valves, as the slides .19 and 20 are constantly moving, hein stationary only for an instant at .the time the direction of travel is being reversed, which overcomes the noise that invariably accompanies the use of poppet valves. The Iports 17 can be made wide so that there wil be sufiicient space to permit the gases to enter without wire-drawing and to leave freely so as to prevent excessive hack-pressure.

Havin now described my invention, what I c aim as new is:

1. An internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinders arranged in a row, intake and exhaust ports opening into said cylinders, means for periodically opening and closing said ports in a predetermined se uence, said means comprising two flat sli es, each provided with two parallel rows of four openings, each of the openings adapted to register with certain port openings and with corresponding openings in the other slide so as to permit gases to enter and leave said cylinders in a predetermined sequence, and means for reciprocating said ings and with corresponding openings in the other slide so as to permit gases to enter and leave said cylinders in a predetermined sequence, and means for reciprocating said slides in accordance with the speed of the engine, said means comprising an eccentric and a. connecting rod for each slide, said eccentrics being rotated at the same angular velocity and one having a lead of substantially degrees with respect to the other.

3. An internal combustion engine comprising a cylinder block having a plurality of cylinders arranged in a substantially straight line, a piston in each cylinder, a crank shaft, a rod connecting each piston to a crank arm, a removable cylinderhead, said cylinderhead having an intake and an exhaust port opening for each cylinder, two parallel flat slides cooperatively connected with said cylinderhead, each slide having two rows offour openings each adapted to register with certain of said port-openings at some particular position of the slide, the openings in the slides being also arranged to register with each other at certain predetermined relative positions of the slides, and means operatively connected to the crank shaft for reciprocating said slides in accordance with the speed of rotation of the engine.

4. An internal combustion engine com prising a cylinder block having a plurality of cylinders arranged straight line, a piston in each cylinder, a crank shaft, a rod connecting each piston to a crank arm, a removable cylinderhcad, said cylinderhead having an intake and an exhaust port opening for each cylinder, two parallel flat slides cooperatively connected with said cylinderhead, each slide having two rows of four openings each adapted to register with certain of said port openings at some particular position of the slide, the openings in the slides being alsoarranged to register with each other at certain pre determined relative positions of the slides, and means operatively connected to the crank shaft for reciprocating said slides in accordance with the speed of rotation of the engine, said means comprising an eccentric and a connecting rod for each slide, said eccentrics being rotated at the same angular velocity but one leading the other by substantially 90 degrees.

in a. substantially 5. An internal combustion engine comprising'a cylinder block having a plurality of cylinders arranged in a substantially straight line, a piston in each cylinder, a crank shaft, a rod connecting each piston to a crank arm, a removable c linderhead secured to said engine block, said cylinderhead having two spaced parallel horizontal walls extending the entire length thereof, said Walls having an intake and an exhaust port opening for each cylinder, a pair 'of flat slides located in the space between said walls, said slides each having two rows of four openings each adapted to register with the first-mentioned port openings. and with each other at predetermined. positions of the slides, and means operatively connected with the crank shaft of the engine for reciprocating said slides whereby the intake and exhaust ports will be opened and closed in a predetermined sequence.

(3. An internal combustion engine comprising a cylinder block having a plurality of cylinders arranged in a substantially straight line, crank shaft, a rod connecting each piston to a crank arm, a removable c linderhead secured to said engine block, said cylinderhead having two spaced parallel horizontal walls extending the entire length thereof, said walls having an intake and an exhaust port opening for each cylinder, apair of flat slides located in the space between said walls, said slides each having two rows of four openings each adapted to register with the first-mentioned port openings and with each other at predetermined positions of the slides, and means operatively connected with the crank shaft of the engine for reciprocating said slides whereby the intake and exhaust ports will be opened and closed in a predetermined sequence, said means comprising a shaft rotatably connected to the crank shaft, a pair of eccentrics non-rotatably connected to the shaft,

and a connecting rod joining each eccentric to one of said slides, one of said eccentrics leading the other by substantially 90 de grees.

7. An internal combustion engine comprising a cylinder block having a plurality I a piston in each cylinder, a

of cylinders arranged in a substantially straight line, a piston in each cylinder, a crank shaft, a rod connecting each piston to a crank arm, a removable c linderhead secured to said engine block, sa1d cylinderhead having two spaced parallel horizontal walls extending the entire length thereof, said walls having an intake and an exhaust port opening for each cylinder, a pair of flat slides located in the space between said walls, said slides each having two rows of four openings each adapted to register with the first-mentioned portopenings and with each other at predetermined positions of the slides, the adjacent faces of the parallel walls having longitudinal grooves, said slides having projections adapted to engage in said grooves, and means operatively connected with the crank shaft of the engine for reciprocating said slides whereby the intake and exhaust ports will be opened and closed in a predetermined sequence.

8. An internal combustion engine comof cylinders arranged in a substantially straight line, a piston in each cylinder, a

crank shaft, a rod connecting each piston to a crank arm, a removable cylinderhead secured to said engine block, said cylinderhead having two spaced parallel horizontal walls extending the entire length thereof, said walls having an intake and an exhaust port opening for each cylinder, a pair of flat slides located in the space between said walls, said slides each having two rows of four openings each adapted to register with the first-mentioned port openings andwith each other at predetermined positions of the slides, the adjacent faces of the parallel walls having longitudinal grooves, said slides having projections adapted to engage in said grooves, the adjacent sides of the.

THOMAS J. MALONEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4765287 *Nov 2, 1987Aug 23, 1988Taylor Bill ASlide valve apparatus for internal combustion engine
US5040498 *Dec 12, 1989Aug 20, 1991Peter SchererValve arrangement for cylinders of an internal combustion engine
US5261359 *Aug 2, 1991Nov 16, 1993Hull Francis RReciprocating 2-stroke cycle internal combustion engine
US6105542 *Mar 3, 1997Aug 22, 2000Efford; Clive WilliamModular engine
US7263963Sep 22, 2006Sep 4, 2007Jp Scope LlcValve apparatus for an internal combustion engine
US7373909Sep 22, 2006May 20, 2008Jp Scope LlcValve apparatus for an internal combustion engine
US7448354Jul 30, 2007Nov 11, 2008Jp Scope LlcValve apparatus for an internal combustion engine
US7461619Sep 22, 2006Dec 9, 2008Jp Scope LlcValve apparatus for an internal combustion engine
US7874271Dec 8, 2008Jan 25, 2011Jp Scope LlcMethod of operating a valve apparatus for an internal combustion engine
US8087393May 16, 2008Jan 3, 2012Arrow Leads, Inc.Zero float valve for internal combustion engine and method of operation thereof
US8108995Sep 22, 2006Feb 7, 2012Jp Scope LlcValve apparatus for an internal combustion engine
US8516988Feb 3, 2012Aug 27, 2013Jp Scope, Inc.Valve apparatus for an internal combustion engine
US8528511Feb 27, 2009Sep 10, 2013Jp Scope, Inc.Variable travel valve apparatus for an internal combustion engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/188.1, 123/188.4, 123/58.9
International ClassificationF01L5/02, F01L5/00
Cooperative ClassificationF01L5/02
European ClassificationF01L5/02