Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1539907 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1925
Filing dateApr 8, 1924
Priority dateApr 8, 1924
Publication numberUS 1539907 A, US 1539907A, US-A-1539907, US1539907 A, US1539907A
InventorsMcgill John F
Original AssigneeMcgill John F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Attachment for tents
US 1539907 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June' 2. 1

J. F. M GILL ATTACHMENT FOR TENTS Filed April 8, 1924 Patented June 2, 1925.

mirrsees.

JOHQN r 140mm,, or; Q AN'rIeo, VIRGINIA.

AmTA- NT FOR TEN/BS.

Application fi led Aqaril 8,

To all whom it may concern Be it known that 11, J HN. MoGuLL, a citizen; of the United States, residing at Quentico, in the county at Prince William; and State at Vim inie, have invent d s new and useful Attachment 05 Tents, 0t which the. following is a specification.

This invention is an attechment 0! protecting the sides and aprons of tents from the rotting action of rain Wete g, draining from the tcnt' fly or the tent 1109i, and spilling, or blowing on these 1,)erts,

lit is common experience in militory encampments, that even. Where tents are carefully surrounded by ditches, the ground frequently becomes water soaked, end wateli will; splash. from the; contiguous. ditches to, the aprons of a tent, and also will seep in under the tent floor. In course. ofi time the fabric, subjected to. such exposure rots, becomes. mildewed' or otherwise. so. affected. that it becomes useless, and: the tent must then be put out of service until proper repairs may be made. It requires. time and considerable labor to properly ditch a camp.

The nmin ditches are usually dug on the outboard sides ends are parallel with the company streets; the feeders o1: ditches. to drain the. Water from each tent are dug under the edges osi the fly and lead to the main ditch or drain, (Dare has to be exercised in the construction of these drains, because if they are too deep they form puddles, and it not deep enough, water will drain into the tent on the. floor thereot, or into the company stizeets.

In. thev Tropics, ehdi especially in camps. Where the Water supply is limited, it is. common practice. tov rig. every conceivable sort. 0t device on the lower edges oi thetent roof or fly, as the case. may be, in Quder to catch the rain water for, Washing, etc. Bun-cine lezwes, bamboo and even. gutters made. 015 lumber are some. of the common cxpedicnts resented to for catching rain, water and diverting it into buckets.

@ne. of the objects of the invention is to protect the canvas sides and puons of a 1924. Serial No. 704,923,

tcnt against rotting action of the elements, by providing simple means for catching- Water, as, it flows down the inclination of the tent fly or tent roof, and todivert it to convenient point of discharge. A, further object is to produce a, device oi the charuc-teu mentioned, Wl iich when in operation, will greatly simplify the. question oit ditching military camp. A further object is to p ovide e device which ill serve to divert rein water for washing, etc., to; a point Where it may be conyeniently discharged into bucket or like receptacle.

The invention will be hereinafter fully set forth and par icular y pointed ut in e claims,

In the accompanying .(h- 'anvingfz-r.

Figure 1 is e perspectirve View il l sti-gating a portion of e -tent, fly With; the, invention applied thereto, Figure, 2 is. a detail see. tional View on, the. line 2:72, Figure Figure 3, is. an enlarged deteil front View, illustrating the discharge spout. Figure 4; is a cross-sectional ViGW' on the line 4 7%,, Figure 3.

efienring to the. duztwing, 10 designetes {l tent fly at the type. conunonlyused by the military and nsrval, forces of the United b'tetes, the same being supported by the e- L pr g t p e L n dg 'pele L2, and, guy copes L3, the latter engaging tent pegs 14 The tify, may be supported h de-pend} era-(1 y i the lush-her iih struted, or it new he placed over the. roof ogii a term, a d supported by the tent poles in a, manner e ussleee d in the art.

1 esign t s e gu e Wh c c nsists O at $5 con-yes; strip 15, doubled oyeu upon itself; to proyide a pocket which encloses a strand; of nope 1 6 The rope is spaced from the fold and secured in place by stitches; 11 and 18, extending. through. the layers. of; cane 51S, ascleerly shown in If igupe 2. The. poction of; canvas between the fold and the rope forms a, rib or extension. 19. The portion 20 of the canvas forms. a. flange Which is sewed directly to, the tent fly by suitable stitching,

It will be noted that the gutter G is illustrated as inclined along the fly to obtain direct flow of water to the front. Any desired inclination may be adopted, but experience has demonstrated that on the fly of a standard tent (9 feet by 9 feet), a total inclination of lS'inches is very effective. r

The delivery end of the gutter G is turned back upon itself as indicated at 21, to form a spout which is so disposed so as to depend in a position over the forward corner of the tent fly, the terminal of the canvas being extended, as indicated at 22, to form a supporting ear secured to the fly.

In operation, water flowing down over the surface of the tent fly (or the tent roof) is arrested by the gutter G, the rope 16 and the rib 19 serving to provide a ridge of substantial capacity. By reason of the inclination of the gutter the water is caused to flow forwardly to the spout 21, which is so disposed that a bucket placed beneath it will receive all of the water discharged by the gutter. It is apparent that any ditch placed around the tent may be so placed as to directly receive the water discharged from the spout.

The advantages of the invention will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art. It will be particularly noted that by catching the water on the roof of a tent or tent fly, and diverting its flow so as to discharge it at a fixed point, the usual splashing and soaking of the sides and aprons will be greatly reduced, and therefore the life of the tent will be considerably increased. It

' will also'be clearly understood that by means of the invention, the ditching of a military camp may be greatly simplified ever present day practice. By securing a gutter of the type described to a tent or tent fly, and providing it with a discharge spout, temporary gutters are rendered unnecessary and simple means are provided by which the rain water may be readily collected. and stored if desired. An important advantage is that while the device is capable of diverting the normal flow of rain water, it will not interfere with the folding of the tent or tent fly when not in use. I

It will be understood that although the invention has been specifically illustrated and described as applied to a tent fly, it is not limited to this particular, but is equally applicable to the roof of a tent and the like.

Having thus explained the nature of the invention and described an operative man ner of constructing and using the same, although without attempting to set forth all of the forms in which it may be made, or all of the forms of its use, what is claimed is 1. The combination with a tent fly or the like, of a strip of material secured thereto near one edge, said n'iaterial having a longitudinally disposed raised portion to intercept any water which may flow down said Q. The combination with a tent fly or the like, of a strip of material secured thereto near one edge, said material having a longitudinally disposed raised portion to intercept any water which may flow down said fly, said strip of material having a spout at its delivery end.

3. The combination with a tent fly or the like, of a strip of material secured thereto near one edge, said material having a longitudinally disposed raised portion to intercept any water which may flow down said fly, said strip of material being inclined from front to back.

4. The combination with a tent fly or the like, of a strip of material secured thereto near one edge, said material having a longitudinally disposed raised portion to intercept any water which may flow down said fly, said strip of material being inclined from front-to back, the lower end of the strip having a depending spout overhanging the frontedge of the fly.

5. The combination with a tent fly or the like, of a gutter of flexible material se cured contiguous to one edge thereof and foldable with the fly.

6. A tent attachment of the character described comprising a longitudinal rib-like portion, and a lateral extension adapted to be secured to a tent or a tent fly.

7. A tent attachment of the character described comprising a strip of flexible material having a longitudinally disposed length of rope enclosed therein, said strip having a laterally disposed portion by means of which it may be secured to a tent or tent fly.

8. A tent attachment of the character described comprising a strip of flexible material, a length of longitudinally disposed rope enclosed therein, said strip having a lateral extension by which it may be secured to a tent or lent fly, said strip also having a rib extending parallel with said rope.

9. A tent attachment of the character described comprising a longitudinal rib-like portion and a lateral extension adapted to be secured to a tent or tent fly, the forward end of the attachment having a depending Spout.

10. A tent attachment of the character described comprising a strip of flexible material having an enlarged rib, and a lateral extension adapted to be secured to a tent or tent fly, the forward end of said canvas strip and rib being folded back upon itself and the parts united to form a spout.

11. A tent attachment of the character described comprising a strip of flexible material having an enlarged rib and a lateral extension adapted to be secured to a tent or tent fly, the forward end of said canms strip and rib being folded back upon itself and the parts united to form a spout, the eontiguous teln'iinal ot the canvas strip being extended to provide an attaching ear.

12. A tent attachment of the character de scribed comprising a strip of flexible material having a longitudinally disposed length of rope enclosed therein, said strip having a laterally disposed portion by means of which it may be secured to a tent or tent fly said rope being bent back at one end to form a loop, the eontinguous portions of the laterally disposed portions of the strip being united, whereby a spout is formed.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand[ JOHN F. MoGILL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3354892 *Jul 15, 1965Nov 28, 1967Gentex CorpBoat canopy
US3698409 *Nov 12, 1969Oct 17, 1972Koontz Raymond AProtective cover structure
US7721746 *Aug 14, 2006May 25, 2010North Pole LimitedMoisture diversion system for a collapsible structure
US8113224Apr 22, 2010Feb 14, 2012North Pole LimitedMoisture diversion system for a collapsible structure
EP1723296A2 *Feb 9, 2005Nov 22, 2006The Coleman Company, Inc.Gutter and downspout system for a tent or shelter
WO2005080709A2 *Feb 9, 2005Sep 1, 2005Coleman CoGutter and downspout system for a tent or shelter
Classifications
U.S. Classification135/120.4
International ClassificationE04H15/32
Cooperative ClassificationE04H15/32
European ClassificationE04H15/32