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Publication numberUS1539972 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1925
Filing dateOct 31, 1924
Priority dateOct 31, 1924
Publication numberUS 1539972 A, US 1539972A, US-A-1539972, US1539972 A, US1539972A
InventorsFloyd C Todd
Original AssigneeFloyd C Todd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cone support for winding machines
US 1539972 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 2,

F. C. TODD CONE SUPPORT FOR WINDING MACHINES Filed Oct. 51, 1924 Patented June 2, 1925.

UNITED STA FLOYD C. TODD, OF GASTONIA, NORTH CAROLINA.

CONE SUPPORT FOR WINDING MACHINES.

Application filed October 31, 1924. Serial in. 747,019.

To all whom it may concern:

Be itknown that I, FLOYD C. TODD, a citizen or" the United States, residing at Gastonia, in the county of Gaston and State of North Carolina, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Cone Supports for Winding Machines, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to cone-winding ma chines, that is to say machines adapted to wind cotton or other yarn upon cones of paste-board or the like, said cones being the commercial form in which such yarns are prepared for use upon knitting machines or analogous devices. My invention relates particularly to that part of such machines the function of which is to support and to rotate the cone to wind the yarn thereupon, and has particular reference to a particular and widely used type of machinerin which the cone arbor, or part which supports the cone, is rotated upon a stationary spindle by means of a rotating cylinder which makes frictional contact with the cone or the yarn wound thereupon.

It is old to use in connection with such machines a stationary spindle lying in a disize to make an easy but not loose fit upon the spindle, said spindle having a collar at one end and a screw and washer at the other end by which the spindle is-retained in said bore, and said arbor having in addition a flange, perpendicular to said shank and upon the outer edge of said flange an apron or socalled cone surface upon which the lower end or" the paste-board cone rests. The arbor in addition has. certain cone securing devices which are familiar to those skilled in this art and which as they do not relate to my present invention need not be further discussed.

The arbor support mentioned is the one most widely used uponmachines of this type, many thousands being inuse at the present time especially for winding cotton yarn, and it has the advantages of simplicity and easy replacement and relative cheapness over more complicated devices used for the same purpose. It has certain defects, however, which greatly impair its usefulness, one of which being that it must be constantly lubricated by hand, oil holes being provided in type all at one time.

the shank of the cone arbor for that purpose, and when so oiled, especially by thev relatively low grade of skilled labor employed in the cotton mills, the lubrication. is often carelessly done with the result that oil is thrown out or spilled upon the yarn of adjacent cones, ruining the same, or the bear-- ing is not adequately lubricated and quickly wears out. At best. the spindles andarbors have a very-short life, the arborv soon wearing loose upon the spindle, the spindlebeing scored and worn whereupon the arbor ports and devices have been designed in which the cone arbor is supported in ball or other non-friction bearings, but these are relatively complicated and expensive and require stuctural changes in the winding machine itself and so far as I am aware have not come into any extensive use in the in' dustry.

An objector my invention :is to provide an antifriction cone-supporting device which I is readily interchangeable with the standard cone supporting device now in use upon such machines, the use of which does not involve any structural changes in the machine itself.

A further object of my inventionzis to provide such a device in which no lubricaww tion of the spindle or arbor shank is re-.-

quired, the only lubrication being upon a bearing of such nature that it will need lubrication onlyat infrequent intervals and so situated as to protect the yarn from splashed or spilled oil.

A further object of my invention isfto provide such a device as will be attached to the winding machine in precisely the same way as the cone supports nowiin use,'thus obviating the necessity of instructing the labor now employed in the method of using the new device. a

A further object of my invention is to placement purposes as the present supports now in use wear out without the necessity of replacing still usable devicesof the old of my invention is to A further object of my invention is to provide such a device as will permit of utilization in its construction of worn out spindles and cone arbors, which are otherwise useless, and by the saving thus eifected to more than offset the cost of the parts which must be added in order to produce a more eflicient anti-friction support.

A further object of my invention is to provide such a device as may be produced by simple machine shop operations, thus obviat ing the necessity of shipping the Worn out spindles and arbors back to the factory for remodeling.

My invention is capable of embodiment in a variety of forms within the spirit of the claims, forming part thereof, one of which for purposes of illustration is showm in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal section of the cone supporting device with a cone thereon.

Fig. 2 is a section on line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a section on line of Fig. 1.

1 is a spindle secured to the winding machine frame by its shank 2. Upon the spindle is a loose cup 3 having a cam surface 4. v

The spindle is provided with a screwthreaded socket 5 to receive a securing screw 6. Upon the securing screw 6 is a washer 7.

Surrounding the spindle is a cone arbor '8 comprising a cylindrical hollow shank 9, a flange 10 and a skirt or-cone surface 11.

Attached to the cone arbor are a pair of spring members 11 secured by screws 12 and provided with dogs 13 the latter adaptedto engage the inner surface of a cone 14 and secure the latter upon the arbor. The ends' of the members 11 are turned inward as at 15 to such position as adapts them to be engaged by the cam surface 4 of the cup 3 and by moving this cup (to the right in Fig. 1 of the drawing) the spring members 11 may be flexed inward to cause the dogs to release the cone, whereupon the cone may be removed from the support.

v By 16 is indicated a driven cylinder, forming part of the winding machine and adapted to make'frictional contact with the cone or the layers of yarn wound thereon and thus revolve the cone and arbor .upon

' the spindle as an axis.

The structure so far described is old and,

apart of winding machines of the type to which my invention relates.

I my. improved device, the spindle 1 is of r duced diameter to have a very loose fit within the bore of the shank 9 ofthe cone-arbor '8. The spindle is preferably of greatest diameter at the butt end 17 with an intermediate portion 19 smaller than the tween said intermediate portion and said end portion.

- The bore of the shank 9 is of considerably greater diameter than the greatest diameter of the spindle and is preferably not of uniform diameter but the internal diameter of its bore is greatest at the end 21 and reduced through the portion 22, thus forming a shoulder 23: \Vithin the portion 21 is a bushin 24, which I preferably make of wood, said hushin being of such a length as to extend from t e end of, the shank 9 to the shoulder 23 whereb it may be retained in position by said shoulder and the washer 7. The bushing has a snug fit within'the bore of the shank 9 and a snug but not binding fit upon the end portion 19 of the spindle 1. The flange 10 of the arbor 8 is provided with a circular recess 25 concentric with the bore of the shank 9 and opening into said bore.

Between the is a thrustbearing 26, preferably a ball thrust bearing and shown as having an inner ring 27 and an outer ring 28, said rings being separated by and forming a race for balls 29. A ball retaining frame 30 may be inserted between the rings.

The ring 27 of the bearing 26 has a driven or ,wedgin fit upon the intermediate portion 18 of t e spindle 1 and abutting against the shoulder 19.

The ring 28 of the bearing 26 has a wedging fit against the peripheral wall -31 of the recess 25.

To osition a yarn receiving cone upon the ar 1- and wind the yarn thereupon, the spindle 1 which is attached to the frame of the winding machine is swung upon a pivot (not shown) away from the drive cylinder 16. The cone is placed over the arbor and the open end positioned on the cone surface 11 at the same time the cup 3 is moved forward in' a directiontoward the pointed end of the cone and the cam surface 4 engages the spring members 11 and moves them inward, thus moving the dogs 13inward. When the cone is in position, the

9o arbor 8' and the spindle 1 its cup is released and the spring members 11 the arbor is forced against the thrust bear ing 26 which carries practicallythe whole weight and the bushing 24 is necessary only to preserve the alinement and thus receives I The retaining screw little wear and may be made of material such as wood which does not require lubrication and so lubrication of the bore of the shank of the arbor may be dispensed with and thus the danger of oil being thrown upon adjoining yarn cones avoided. The ball thrust bearing does require light oiling at infrequent intervals but as this is positioned within the skirt 11 of the arbor 8, the danger of oil being thrown outward upon the yarn of adjoining cones is avoided.

To make my improved device, I take a spindle and arbor of the type described preferably using for economy a worn out and discarded spindle and arbor.

The spindle is placed in a tool such as a,

lathe and the diameter reduced so as to nake it fit loosely within the bore of the arbor shank, thus removing any scored or worn surfaces of the spindle. The sections 17, 18 and 19 are turned to the required diameters thus producing shoulders 19 and The shank of the arbor is also bored out upon a lathe or other tool and at the same time the recess 25 may be produced in the flange 10. The bore of the end of the shank is enlarged forming the shoulder 23. The wooden or other bushing is then inserted in the bore of the shank abutting against the shoulder 23.

The thrust bearing in assembled form and having an internal diameter adapted to give it a binding fit upon the intermediate portion said spindle and forced along until it abuts against the shoulder 19. The spindle is then placed within the arbor and moved forward until the outer ring of the bearing is forced into the recess of the flange 10. 6 with the washer 7 thereon is screwed into the socket 5 thus securing the arbor and spindle in fixed relation.

It will be noted that the mode of attaching the cone to my improved supporting device is identical with that required with 'the old supporting device herein described,

thus obviating the necessity of instructing the winder-hand in the use of the new device.

What I claim to be new is:

1. In a cone supporting device for winding machines and the like, a stationary spindle, a cone arbor upon said s indle, said bearing comprising a pair 0 flanges with balls between, one of said flanges having a wedging fit upon said spindle and the other flange a wedging fit within said arbor. 1

2. In a cone supporting device for winding machines and the like, a stationary spindle. a cone arbor surrounding said spindle, said arbor provided with a recessed flange adjacent one end of said. arbor and a ball thrust "bearing 18 of the spindle 1 isplaced overconcentric seated in said recess and re volvably supporting said arbor from said spindle. I

3. In a cone supporting device for Winding machines and the like, a stationary spindle, a cone arbor surrounding said spindle, said cone arbor having a cylindrical hollow shank. a flange substantially perpendicular to said shank, and a cone surface at the periphery of said flange, a thrust bearing fitting within a recess of said flange and abushing fitting within the bore of said shank, said bearing and bushing supporting said arbor in spaced relation to said spindle.

4. In a cone supporting device for winding machines and the like, a stationary spindle, a cone arbor surrounding said spindle,

said cone arbor having a cylindrical hollow shank adapted to receive the spindle, a flange at one end of said shank substantially perpendicular thereto, said flange having a recess concentric with the bore of said shank and a ball thrustbearing having a wedging fit within said recess and a wedging fit upon said spindle whereby said arbor is supporte in revolvable relation to said spindle.

5. In a cone supporting device for winding machines and the like, a stationary spindle, said spindle comprising a butt section, a middle section of less diameter than the butt section and an end section of less diameter than said middle section, a cone arbor surrounding said spindle, said cone arbor having a hollow cylindrical shank, a flange at one end of said shank and substantially perpendicular thereto, a recess in said flange concentric with the bore of said shank, a

bushing adjacent the end of said shank and z a bearing fitted in saidrecess, said bushing and bearing supporting said arbor in revolvable relation to said spindle.

6. In a cone supporting device for windin g machines and the like, a stationary spindle, said spindle having three cylindrical sections of progressively decreasing diameter, a cone arbor surroundin said spindle, said cone arbor having a holl ow cylindrical shank, a flange at one end of said shank and substantially perpendicular thereto, a recess in said flange concentric with the bore of said shank, a ball thrust bearing positioned between the peripheral wall of said recess a recess in said flange'concentric having a wedging fit within said recess, and bushing adjacent the extremit of said :1 second channeled ring having a wedging shank and forming a bearing sur ace for the fit upon the intermediate cylindrical section ylmdrical Section of said spindle of least- 10 of said spindle and against the section of dlameter.

5 said spindle which is of the greatest diame- In testlmony whereof I affix my 8 ter, said rings forming together the race- Way of a ball thrust bearing, and a wooden FLOYD C. TODD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2437100 *Oct 16, 1944Mar 2, 1948Lambach FritzAuxiliary bobbin support for use on the shank of a bobbin holder
US2559461 *Apr 10, 1950Jul 3, 1951Pichette John JBobbin spindle construction
US2755027 *Apr 25, 1951Jul 17, 1956Du PontTextile bobbin drive
US2774549 *Jun 3, 1954Dec 18, 1956Dixon CorpBobbin holder
US3287069 *Feb 25, 1963Nov 22, 1966Doubrava K GRoller for supporting conveyor belts
US3977687 *May 7, 1975Aug 31, 1976American Can CompanyHolder for hollow articles
US7523946 *Jun 20, 2005Apr 28, 2009Xerox CorporationExpandable chuck
US7891076Mar 16, 2009Feb 22, 2011Xerox CorporationExpandable chuck
US20060284384 *Jun 20, 2005Dec 21, 2006Xerox CorporationExpandable chuck
US20090174156 *Mar 16, 2009Jul 9, 2009Xerox CorporationExpandable chuck
CN103738781A *Dec 19, 2013Apr 23, 2014张家港市攀峰科技有限公司Upper supporting device
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/130.1, 242/571.5
International ClassificationB65H75/24
Cooperative ClassificationB65H75/245, B65H2701/31
European ClassificationB65H75/24B4