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Publication numberUS1544015 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1925
Filing dateMar 27, 1923
Priority dateMar 27, 1923
Publication numberUS 1544015 A, US 1544015A, US-A-1544015, US1544015 A, US1544015A
InventorsLamy Edward J
Original AssigneeLamy & Son Inc A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cooper stove
US 1544015 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 30, 1925 E. J. LAMY COOPER STOVE Filed March 27. 1923 2 Sheets-Shaet l June 30, 1925.

E. J. LAMY COOPER STOVE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented June 3Q, 1925.

STATEfi e'rssr OFWQE,

EDWARD J. LAMY, OE ELIZABETH, JEESEY, ASSIGNOR TO A. LAMY & SON, INQ, OF ELIZABETH, NEW" FER-3E1, A CORPORATION OF NEVV JERSEY.

COOPER STOVE.

Application fi1ed March 2 To aZZ whom it may concern:

lbe it known that .lf, EDWARD J. LAMY, a citizen of the United States, residing in Elizabeth, in the county of Union and State of New J rsey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Cooper Stoves, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to'the stage in the maiuifacture of barrels in which, after steaming, shaping andassembling the stares to form a barrel body, it must be heated in order to dry out the staves, particularly where the barrel is to be made tight. This heating is effected usually by means of an oil burner within the barrel; and sometin'ies it is desired that the interior of the barrel be singed or even charred.

Usually the barrel body, whose staves are held together by top and bottom hoops, is placed upon a covered pit, the latter containing oil and air supplypipes, and also containing a burner'or cresset which extends up through the cover of the pit; the barrel standing upon said cover and surrounding the cresset. From the burner there usually rises a cylinder which forms the body of the cooper stove, to confine the flames rising from t e burner, said body usually extending up to a point a little above the middle of the bilge of the barrel; and the barrel is dried by heat radiating from the stove body, and by hot gases which rise from the stove to vent freely out ofthe top of the barrel.

It is an object of the invention to reduce the fuel consumed and the time required for the drying, singeing or charring operation, thus enabling an increase in the output without increased expense for labor or overhead, or to enable a larger number of heating outfits to be arrangerL within given limits, or to enable a given output to be reached with a lower initial cost for plant and room.

In many cases the finished barrels eventually develop defects in the nature of warping, splitting, leaking, unevenness or irregularity of form, local weaknesses, etc., and an object of the invention is to reduce or eliminate these difficulties, and insure a more perfect product,

Usually the bilge of the barrel is the slow- 7 est part to dry, as the ordinary stove or cresset does not force the heat out,;but dries first the barrel portions of small diameter, viz, the top and bottom portions, these portions, however, being least important, as it '7, 1923. Serial No. 628,011.

is the portions which have the greater curvature that need drying'the most, viz, the bilge portions. It is an object of the invention to overcome this difficulty.

To attain these and other objects, one of the features of the invention is'the securing of more direct and ample action of the heated gases upon the bilge portion of the barrel, as compared with previous methods, whereby the top portion of the barrel, which is of relatively small diameter, was exposed to more heat than the bilge portion, which is of relatively great diameter; whereby the heating of the end and bilge portions was rendered very unequal, thus developing in course of time defects in the finished barrel, besides requiring the drying-out operation to be prolonged, in the effort to dry out the bilge portion adequately, this of course necessarily heating the end portion ex cessively.

According to this invention, there is suspended or placed above the stove body a bilge-heater, which is in the form of a broad inverted cone, constiti'iting a heat-spreader or battle, which conducts the rising heated gases outwardly to the bilge portion of the barrel. It also serves to reflect heat radiated from the stove body outwardly to the bilge. The body of the stove may be cut down sufficiently sothat the upper edge of the gassprcading cone may stand within the bilge portion of the barrel, preferably a trifle above the middle of the barrel, to cause the hot gases to diffuse themselves throughout the bilge, that is, upwardly from a'point about level with the top of the truncated stove body.

The lower end of the barrel receives heat radiated directly from the stove, and the heat from the gases is absorbed largely by the bilge portion of the barrel, thereby insuring the prompt drying out thereof, whereas heretofore the gases have risen right to the top of the barrel while fully heated, thus tending to overheat the end of the barrel and underheat the bilge.

Other features and advantages will hereinafter appear.

In the accompanying drawings,

Figure 1 is a sectional central elevation to illustrate the heating of a barrel body by means of the present improvements, which are shown in connection with the well known Parson type of cooper stove and quipment.

Figure 2 is a sectional perspective view of vheel 16 and an oil valve wheel 17; the

lmrner extending up through an opening- 18 in the cover 19 of the pit. In carrying out the present invention, the body 20, of the stove, which rises from the burner, may be considerably truncated or reduced in height from the usual practice, so that the top of it stands substantially below the middle of the el, or in the neighborhood of the point .3. the lower endsscction or thebarrel merges intothe bilgesection thereof. This stove is central with respect to the barrel, which consists oi? staves 21 held together by top and bottom hoops 22 and rests n 3011 the pit cover 19. V

Above the stove is a novel bilge-drier in the form of an inverted conical shield or spreader 23, the diameter of which may be considerably more than hall as great 'as'the greatest diameter of the barrel bilge, so as to conduct the hot gases outwardly from the stove to impinge upon the staves at the bilge, and also as to choke the passage for the rising'gas and hence check its speed of ascent, so that it lingers in the bilge and therefore surrenders more of its heat to the bilge sections of the staves. Thus the bilge is well heated, and although the rising to the upper end of the barrel is somewhat reduced in temperature, still it is suilicient for heating this end of the barrel, since said end is ot less diameter ascompared with the bilge portion and therefore requires less heat, and since the upilow of the heated gases is re stricted b the CliOlilIW action of the b1l6 .3 s e heater or gas-spreader 28, and hence the gases ascend slowly, as compared with the former custon'i to vent the unobstructed gases freely at the open top of the barrel.

The spreader or bilge-heater 23 may be separated from the stove as shown, to permit escape or gases from the latter; audit desired, in some cases, the stove 20 may also have a small individual cover or baille 24:

of the construction heretofore employed on cooper stoves; this stove-cover 24 being of about the same diameter asthe stove body 20, and resting upon the top thereof, but somewhat separated therefrom, the gases emerging from the stove body at its top side edges. This baiile 2 1, it used, may be of very small diameter as compared with the bilge-heater 23 above.

The bilge-heater23may be conveniently supported by means of a central pendent rod or support 25, fixed at itslower end in a cap 2-6, which is riveted at 2'? to the inner apex oi the spreader said rod having at its upper end an eye 28, into which is hooked a chain 29, the latter running over one or more pulleys 30, and carrying at its other end a weight 31, to counterbalance the heavy bilgeheater n3, so that the latter may be easily raised, and may also be retained in its elevated position.

, In some cases there may be provided the novel feature of an additional choke for the hot gases, in the form of a cover for the top of the barrel, this cover being undersized, however so asto leave a constricted vent 33 at the top oi the barrel for the spent gases, suiiicient to insure 'ood operation of the burner, while prolonging the confinement of the hot gases. The cover is also effective in minimizing radiation of heat out of the top of the barrel, thus still further reducing the time required and the fuel consumed in the operation. Both cover 32 and bilge-heater 23 may be made of iron, and the cover may have at intervals hooks 34; or the like to support it upon the top edge of the barrel; these hooks being bolted at 35 upon the cover. The spreader stem or rod 25 plays loosely in a hole 36 in the cover. The eyepiece 28, which is secured to the top of the rod 25, supports the bilgeheater 23 upon the cover 32 as'the latter rests upon the top edge oi' the barrel, as at Figures 1 and hen the weight 31 is pulled down, the bilge-heater is'carried up against the cover, and upon further ascent carries the cover up with it to the Figure 8 position, clear of the barrel, topermit its removal and replacement by a fresh barrel.

By this method the time required for dry ing out the barrel is substantially reduced, and the prod substantially in'iproved. In some casesfrom two to four minutes per barrel can be saved, with corresponding economy of fuel, as compared with from seven to ten minutes required in previous operations. It is also observed that no appreciable time is lost in withdrawing the disks 23 and 32 from the dried-out barrel and placing them in the succeeding barrel.

Variations may be resorted to within the scope of the invention, and portions of the improvements may be used without others.

'Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. In a barrel drier, the combination with a cresset, of aspreader removably supported above said cresset and mounted to conduct the heated gasesto the bilge portion of the barrel;said spreader in the form of: an inverted cone nearly closing the barrel, and means for lifting said spreader out of the barrel.

2. In a barrel drier, the combination with a cresset, of a gas spreader, and means for supporting said gas spreader above said cresset in position to divert the gas to the bilge of the barrel, said supporting means being movable to withdraw the spreader from the barrel, and comprising a counterpoiseto detain the spreader in either its operating or ineffective position.

- 3. A bilge drier, spreader in the form of an inverted cone, means for removably sus pending the cone within the barrel over said drier, and means supporting the barrel.

t. A bilge drier, a spreader in the form of an inverted cone, means rising upwardly from said spreader for supporting the same in working position, and movable to lift the same out of the barrel independently of the drier, and means supporting the barrel to be dried.

5. As a new article of manufacture, a bilge drier, an inverted cone over said drier, means for removably suspending the cone within the barrel to be dried, including a counterbalance for the cone, and means supporting the barrel.

6. As a new article of manufacture, a bilge drier, an inverted cone over said drier, means tor removably suspending the same within the barrel to be dried, said cone of a diameter to choke the upward passage for the heated gases, and means supporting the barrel.

7. The herein-described bilge drier, an inverted cone over said drier, a central pendent supporter for said cone, means upon which said supporter rests, and means supporting the barrel.

8. A bilge drier, a spreader in the form of an inverted cone, a central pendent supporter for said cone comprising a device which rests upon the top of the barrel to be dried, and means supporting the barrel.

9. I11 a barrel drier, the combination with a cresset, of a gas spreader arranged above the cresset and extending into the bilge of the barrel, said spreader flaring outwardly and upwardly from the cresset, and a cover nearly closing the top of said barrel to confine the heated gases.

10. In a barrel drier, the combination with a cresset, of a gas spreader arranged above the cresset and extending into the bilge of the barrel, said spreader flaring outwardly and upwardly from the cresset, and a cover nearly closing the top of said barrel to confine the heated gases, said spreader having means whereby it is supported upon said cover.

11. I11 a barrel drier, the combination with a cresset, of a gas spreader arranged above the cresset and extending into the bilge of the barrel, said spreader flaring outwardly and upwardly from the cresset, and a cover nearly closing the top of said barrel to confine the heated gases, said spreader having means whereby it is supported upon said cover, and said cover having means whereby it is supported uponthe top of said barrel.

12. In a barrel drier, the combination with a cresset, of a gas spreader arranged above the cresset and extending into the bilge of the barrel, said spreader flaring outwardly and upwardly from the cresset, a. cover nearly closing the top of said barrel to conline the heated gases, said spreader having means whereby it is supported upon said cover, and said cover having means whereby it is supported upon the top of said barrel, and means for lifting the spreader and cover together oil from the barrel.

13. In a barrel drier, the combination with a cresset, of a gas spreader arranged above the cresset and extending into the bilge of the barrel, said spreader flaring outwardly and upwardly from the cresset, a cover nearly closing the top of said barrel to confine the heated gases, said spreader having means whereby it is supported upon said cover, and a lifting cable connected to said spreader, the spreader being movable relatively to said cover, and said cable running over a pulley and having a counterweight.

1a. In a barrel drier, the combination with a cresset, ot' a gas spreader arranged above the cresset and extending into the bilge of the barrel, said spreader flaring outwardly and upwardly from the cresset, a cover nearly closing the top of said barrel to confine the heated gases, said spreader having means whereby it is supported upon said cover, said supporting means in the form of a rod or connection having an eye at its upper end, said eye resting upon said cover, and a cable connected to said eye and running over a pulley for lifting both the spreader and the cover from the barrel.

15. A drier for barrels comprising a cresset, a spreader for conducting the heated gases from the cresset outwardly to the bilge of the barrel and to afford a constricted passage to the top of the barrel, and a cover for the top of the barrel, said cover nearly filling the barrel so as to afford a constricted vent for gas from the top of the barrel.

16. A drier for barrels comprising a cresset, aspreader for conducting the heated gases from the cresset outwardly to the bilge of the bar *el and to afliord a constricted passage to the top 01": the barrel, a cover for the top of the barrel, said cover nearly filling the barrel so as to afford a constricted vent for gas from the top of the barrel, and means connected with said spreader for lifting it, together with said cover, from the top of the barrel.

17 A barrel-drying apparatus comprising a cresset, a cover nearly closing the top of the barrel, means being provided upon said cover for enabling it to rest upon the top edge of the barrel, and means for lifting said cover oil from the barrel.

18. A barrel-drying apparatus comprising a cresset, a cover nearly closing the top of the barrel, means being provided upon said cover for enabling it to rest upon the top edge of the barrel, means for lifting said cover off from the barrel, and a spreader pendent from said cover for diverting the heated gas from said cresset to the bilge of the barrel.

1%). A barrel-drying apparatus comprising a cresset, a cover nearly closing the top of the barrel, means being provided upon said cover for enabling it to rest upon the top edge of the barrel, and a spreader pendent from said cover. for diverting the heated gas from said cresset to the bilge of the barrel, said cover and spreader being connected to a cable, whereby they may both be lifted from said barrel, said cable having counter balancing means.

20. An apparatus for drying and singeing a headless wooden barrel, comprising a lloor or support locating the barrel on end, a cresset having the form of a stove comprising a burner and a flame-continin g body surrounding the burner, said stove'extending upward in the barrel and venting at its top, means directing the flow of heated gases from the top oi the stove outwardly against the sides of the wooden barrel, and means for sup porting said directing means over said stove and within the bilge portion of the barrel.

2.1. An apparatus for drying and singeing a headless wooden barrel, comprising a floor or support locating the barrel on end, a cresset having the form of a stove comprising a burner and a flame-confining body surrounding the burner, said stove extending upward in the barrel and venting at its top, means directing the flow of heated gases from the top of the stove outwardly against the sides of the wooden barrel, and means extending out of the top of the barrel for lowering said directing means to effective position 111st over said stove and within the bilge portion of the barrel and for l lting said directing means out of the top of the the sides oli the wooden barrel, and means for supporting said directing means over said stove and within the bilge portion 01 the barrel, said directing means in the form of a spreader flaring outwardly and up wardly from the cresset nearly to the sides of the barrel about midway of its height.

23. An apparatus for drying and singeing a headless wooden barrel, comprising a floor or support locating the barrel on end, a eresset having the form ot a stove comprising a burner and a flan'ie-conlining body surrounding the burner, said stove extending *upwa rd in the barrel and having a to), vent being left at the sides of the stove below said top, a spreader, and means removably supporting said spreader above said top, said spreader diverting the heated gases to the bilge portion of he barrel and nearly closing the barrel.

24;. An apparatus for drying and sin gein g a headless wooden barrel, comprising a floor or support locating the barrel on end, a cres set having the form of a stove comprising a burner and ailalne-contining body surrounding the burner, said stove extendingupward in the barrel and ventin at its top, iineans directing the flow of heated gttSCSl'lOll'l the top of the stoveoutwardly against the sides of the wooden barrel, and means for supporting said directing means over said stove and within the bilge portion oi the barrel, said supporting means movable to lift said spreader out of the barrel independently of the stove or cresset.

EDWARD J. LAMY.

Witnesses Marion MoCArrnnr, JENNIE P. Tnonun.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2705627 *Dec 27, 1950Apr 5, 1955Standard Oil CoPortable apparatus for stress-relieving of vessels
US2822160 *Aug 16, 1954Feb 4, 1958Nat Furnace CorpFurnace for cleaning containers
US4507082 *Apr 8, 1982Mar 26, 1985Wardlaw Iii Louis JPreheating insert for heavy wall pipe
US4585158 *Nov 23, 1984Apr 29, 1986Wardlaw Iii Louis JMethod of welding using preheating insert for heavy wall pipe
Classifications
U.S. Classification432/221
International ClassificationF26B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationF26B21/006
European ClassificationF26B21/00F