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Publication numberUS1547562 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 28, 1925
Filing dateJul 21, 1924
Priority dateJul 21, 1924
Publication numberUS 1547562 A, US 1547562A, US-A-1547562, US1547562 A, US1547562A
InventorsByrd Thomas Luther
Original AssigneeByrd Thomas Luther
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pipette
US 1547562 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

T. L. BYRD PIPETTE July 28, 1925.

Filed July 21, 1924 Quoru Patented July 28, 1925.

- UNITED STATES,

, PATENT OFFIQE.

momsrmrnnn BYBD, or MILWAUKEE, wrsoolvsnv.

PI'PETTE.

Application filed July 21, 1824. Serial No. 727,248.

, kee and State of Wisconsin, have, invented certain new and useful Improvements in Pipettes, of which the following is a specification, reference beiiigvhad therein to the accompanying drawing.

- This invention relates to pipettes and the principal object of the invention is to provide a device of this character, which may be conveniently used for obtaining and diluting small quantities of blood to be subsequently patients. r

It has been found in actual. practice that the ordinary ipette, commonly used for obtaining blood fof' counting tests of the red and white corpuscles, is entirely unsuited to the .work of 0 taining blood for-su ar tests. In a pipette constructed for oitaining blood for counting the white cells, its usual used for sugar testsof diabetic capacity is about-.250 (30., whereas the red.

blood cell counting pipettes total capacity is approximately .425 cc. or a fraction over 1; cc. The adherence of blood to a capillary tube, which would'hold sufiicient for the process for which the resent device has beenconceived, would ma e a tube so long as to be totally impracticable, also the cleaning of a tube of this clfaracter, after each use, would be extremely tedious and costly.

It is, therefore, one of the objects of this invention to provide adevice which overcomes the difiiculties heretofore encountered and in which the blood can be conveniently retained and accurately diluted in an instrument whichmay be held at its ends between the thumb and forefinger.

In'the process of obtaining blood from a patient, the operator very often has to pause in the process toexpress more blood from the bleeding point, when only a small part of the required amount of blood necessary has been originally obtained and it is, therefore, another object of this invention to rovide a pipette having a substantially siform blood containing chamber, which will contain the required amount of blood and yet prevent the same from running out of the pipette and thus being lost.

Still another object of the invention is the provision of a pipette of relatively small dimensions longitudinally so that an elastic band may be stretched over the pi ette lengthwise and close both ends thereo effectively, thus permitting proper agitation of the diluted fluid without the possibility of losing an Further objectsof the invention will ap pear as the following specific description is read in connection with the accompanying drawing, which forms part of this application and in which:

Figure 1 is an elevation, showing the com plete pipette with the suction tube attached thereto; Fig. 2 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view-with the suction tube removed;

' Fig. 3 is an elevation of the pipette with the suction tube removed and the end-closin band sprung. thereover;

igs. 4, 5, 6 and 7 are sections taken at various points throughout the length of the pipette, their position being indicated by the dotted lines in Fi 2.

' The pipette, as sIiown'in Fig. 1, comprises an-elongated tube of glass,fused quartz, or

similar transparent material, generally indicated at 1. The upper end of the pipette is provided with a flange 2, over which one end of a flexible and resilient tube 3 is adapted to be removably secured.

The opposite end of the tube 3 is similarly secured over a mouthpiece 4, which is utilized by the operator to produce a suction in the tube and ipette, so as to draw the blood from the b eeding point into the pipette in a well-known manner.

As shown in Fig.2, the bore 5 of the pipette is variously diametered. The lower portion or inlet end of the pipette is provided with a filiform passage 6 leading mto a substantially fusiform chamber 7 of somewhat larger diameter than the bore 6. The upper end of this chamber merges gradually into a second filiform passage 8, which in turn merges into a diluting chamber 9 of relatively large capacity compared with the chamber 7 and also fusiform in shape. This upper chamber also merges at its upper end into an attenuated passage 10 and, as

shown, contains a glass 'or fused quartz cube 11, which is utilized to facilitate the agitation and proper cominingling of the blood with the diluting fluid. Intermediate the chambers 7 and 9, the outer surface of the pipette is provided --'with a graduation mark 12, and. above the chamber 9 there is provided a second graduation'13. The lower graduation indicates that the bore up to this point contains cc. of blood, wl'iile the up per graduation indicates that t obtained to fill the bore of the pipette to the graduation 12. After this is done, end 6 is inserted in a suitable diluted fluid, such as distilled water or the like, and a sufiiclent quantity drawn into the tube to fill the bore up to the graduation 13. The tube 3 is then removed and a band, similar to that indicated at 14, is placed over the ends of the tube and the same grasped between the middle finger and thumb and shaken thoroughly 4 so that the cube 11 will effectively agitate and cause a thorou h intermingling of the two fluids. This uid may then. be expelled from the pipette and placed in a test tube. for making the usual tests for diabetes. What I claim is: 1. A ipettehavin spaced chambers, one of whic 1s substantia y fusiform.

2. A ipette having spaced chambers, one

' of whic 1s fusiform and a filiform passage connecting said chambers.

3. A pipette having a variousl diametered bore, including spaced 'cham rs.

4; A pipette having a variously diametered bore, including spaced connected chambers, one of which is substantially fusiform.

5. A pipette having a variously diametered bore, including spaced connected chambers, one of which is substantially fusiform and an agitating element in the other of said chambers.

6. A pipette constructed of transparent material and having a variously diametered bore intersected by spaced chambers, one of which is fusiform and a filiform entrance passage into said chamber.

7. pipette, constructed of transparent material and having a variously diametered bore intersected by spaced chambers, one of which is fusiform and a filiform passage 8. A pipette comprising a transparent body having a .variously diametered bore intersected by enlarged spaced chambers, a filiform inlet into said bore and a filiform outlet from one of said chambers.

9. A pipette comprising a transparent body having a variously diametered bore intersected by enlarged spaced chambers, a

filiform inlet into said bore and a filiform outlet from both of said chambers.

e bore to nuance i 10. A pipette comprising atrans arent body having a variously diametere bore including spaced chambers and graduations on opposite sides of one of said chambers. Y

11. A. pipette comprising a transparent body having a various diametered bore including spaced chambers and filiform asssages on opposite sides of said cha n, rs and graduatlons on said tube arranged -ad= jacent said filiform passages.

12. A pipette oomprislng a transparent body having a longltudinal bore and relmovable means for. closing the ends of said ore.

13. A pipette comprising a transparent body having a longitudinal bore and a flexible band for closing the ends of said bore.

14.. A ipette comprising a transparent body havmg a central bore including spaced chambers, one of which is fusiform and a loosely mounted a itating element in the other of said cham ers.

15. A pipette comprising a transparent body having acentral bore including spaced chambers, one of which is fusiform and a loosely mounted cubical agitating element in the other of said chambers.

- 16. A pipette com rising a transparent body have a central ore including spaced fusiform chambers, and a loosely mounted agitating element in one of said chambers. 17. A pipette of transparent material, havingtwo spaced fusiform chambers connected by a scaled neck with filiform bore, the opposite ends of 'said chambers terminating in tubular extensions of filiform bore, the upper of which is scaled and expands into a tube of indefinite contents constructed to receive a rubber tube, the lower having a capillary tube and tapering to a dull point. V

18. A pipette of transparent material, having a variously diametered bore including two fusiform chambers connected by a scaled tubular neck of minute bore, one of which chambers is one-tenth cc. capacity and terminates'in a tapering tube of minute bore, and'the other chamber being seven-tenths cc. capacity, tapering into a scaled tube of minute bore which expands into a tube ofindefinite capacity.

19. A- pipette consisting material and having a variously diametered bore that expands into fusif orm chambers of specific capacity, the inlet to one of said chambers being of capillary bore, the connecting neck'of said chambers also being of minute bore and scaled, and the outlet of the other chamber being contracted into a taperof transparent I form distention of one-tenth cc. cato receive and retain a rubber tube which pacity, converging into a scaled neck of terminates with a mouth iece. tubular form' with minute bore, which con- In testimony whereof affix my signature nects with and expands into another fusiin the presence of two witnesses.

5 form chamber of seven-tenths cc. ca- THOMAS LUTHER BYRD.

pacity, terminating in a scaled tube of mi- Witnesses: nute bore which expands into a tube of in-- CHARLES M. SCANLAN,

definite capacity whose end is constructed CARL KEMPF.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2893710 *Nov 6, 1957Jul 7, 1959Henry GoodmanTube container for paint
US3215500 *Jun 12, 1961Nov 2, 1965Donald L BittnerLaboratory mixer-separator
US3580686 *Mar 17, 1969May 25, 1971Coulter ElectronicsVessel having intersample anticontamination construction
US3794035 *Mar 7, 1972Feb 26, 1974Brenner NSuction system for skin treatment
US4877585 *Dec 9, 1987Oct 31, 1989Brandeis UniversityDilution pipette device
US5174162 *Jul 10, 1990Dec 29, 1992Hitachi, Ltd.Pipetter, pipette tube, sample analyzing apparatus including them and method of mixing and pipetting liquids
US5544960 *Aug 11, 1995Aug 13, 1996Sommovigo; Christopher V.Faceted stirring object for solid and liquid food substances
US5773305 *May 2, 1996Jun 30, 1998Bayer Corp.Sample dilution module
US5823046 *Jul 18, 1997Oct 20, 1998Schagerstroem; TonieFor measuring finely ground packable, dry material
US6261847Jul 10, 1998Jul 17, 2001Bayer CorporationSample dilution module with offset mixing chamber
US6296452Apr 28, 2000Oct 2, 2001Agilent Technologies, Inc.Microfluidic pumping
US6533553Oct 1, 2001Mar 18, 2003Agilent Technologies, Inc.Microfluidic pumping
US7182915 *Nov 27, 2002Feb 27, 2007Bristol-Myers Squibb CompanyPipette configurations and arrays thereof for measuring cellular electrical properties
US7452508 *Nov 6, 2001Nov 18, 2008Jacobs Merrit NAgitating fluids with preferential apparatus; obtain liquids, draw into agitation apparatus, agitate, monitor fluid in apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/514, 366/143, 366/241, 422/922, 366/130, 73/426, 366/342, 73/864.1
International ClassificationB01L3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB01L3/021
European ClassificationB01L3/02C