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Publication numberUS1552617 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1925
Filing dateMar 2, 1922
Priority dateMar 2, 1922
Publication numberUS 1552617 A, US 1552617A, US-A-1552617, US1552617 A, US1552617A
InventorsKisor Theodore
Original AssigneeRoll O Mfg Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baseball-game apparatus
US 1552617 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sephs, 1925.

T. KISOR BASEBALL GAME APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet l M mmll www Filed March 2, 1922` m N m T T A Sept. 8, T925.

T. KlsoR BASEBALL GAME APPAma'lusA Filed Maron 2, 1922 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ,N653 r. zam

' INVENTOR. van mmnities for winning the Patented Sept. 8, 1925'. l p UNITED STATES PATENTA oFFIcE.

THEODOBE KISOR, 0l' GENEVA, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR' T0 ROFL-0 ANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC., 0F GENEVA, NEW YORK, A CORPORATION 0F NEW YORK.

:BASEBALL-GAME APPARATUS.

Application led Iroh 2, 1922. Serial No. 540,530.

To aZZ whom 'it may cof/wem.'

Be it known that I, THnoDoRn KIsoR, a citizen of the United States, and resident of Geneva, in the county of Ontario and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in a Baseball- Game Apparatus, of which the following is a speclcation.

The present invention relates to a baseball game apparatus and has for its object to provide means by which a game may be played closely resembling and simulatino an actual game of rofessional baseball, and not depending sole y upon chance, but permitting a player with a knowledge of the professiona game to use such knowledge for the purpose of increasing his opportugame.

To this and other ends, the invention consists of certain parts and combinationsof "parts, all of which will be hereinafter described, the novel features being pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a game board constructed in accordance with this invention with charts thereon;

Fig. 2 is a side view of one of the bodies or men used in the game;

Figs. 3 'to 5, inclusive, are perspective views of three cubes forming one embodiment of the chance devices used in the game; and

Fig. 6 is a plan View of a portion of another embodiment of the invention in which the chance devices and the charts are combined. f l

. Referring more particularly to the drawings, 1 indicates a board having printed or otherwise delineated thereon a ield or diamond-similar to an ordinary baseball field or diamond with a home base 2, first base 3, second base 4, and a thirdbase 5 and with -or without any other matter or marking which will tend to simulate an ordinary baseball field.

It is preferred to employ in connection with the field or diamond, a plurality of movable bodies 6 of which there may be any desired number, eighteen in this instance, for representing the men or two teams of nine each, as in an ordinary base-y ball gaine, these men, when not being used, being fitted, if desired, in pockets 7 ar ranged in two rows of nlne each on opposite sides of the names of the men which may correspond to name's of men in the big baselatter may be provided with suitably designated spaces 11 for keeping the score by lnmngs, and adjacent these spaces may be arranged a suitably numbered pocket 12 for receivlng a marker held, when not in use, in-

a pocket 13 and adapted to indicate the number of players out in any innin The board may also have suitably deslgnated pockets 14 in which a marker, normally held in the pocket 15, may be fitted to indicate the number of balls against a man. There may also be provided suitably designated pockets 16 for receiving a marker, normally held in the pocket 17, for indicating the number of strikes against a man. The board may also be provided with suitably designated pockets 18 for receiving a marker, normally held in a pocket 19, for indicating the number of runs made by any team during one inning.

In order that the batter body may be held in position at the home plate and the men on bases may be suitably positioned on such bases, the home plate as well as the first, second and third bases are provided with pockets, indicated at 20, 2 1, 22 and 23 respectively into which the reduced ends 8 of the men or bodies 6 ma be fitted. Adjacent the first, second an third bases, pockets'24, 25 and 26 maybe provided, respectively,for giving advanced positions of the men or bodies at such bases to be used in a manner to .be described more particularly hereinafter.l l

In order `to determine the result of a pitched ball with respect to the body or 'man representing Ithe batter, as well as to determine whether any men on the basesare to advance, there is providedv a main chart which, in the embodiment shown in Fig. 1, comprises a plurality of main divisions, 6 in this instance,r 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 and 32, each main division having sub-divisions, 11 in this instance, indicatedl at 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42 and 43, this chart, in the embodiment shown in Fig. 1, being provided on the board' l beyond the playing field. The main (lvisions are distinguished by one type of c aracters as letters A,'B,

determining the result of a pitched ball to` the batter with respect to a body or man.

representing the batter and also in every instance with respect to a body or bodiesv representing a man or men on the bases. This chart is also preferably divided 'into six main divisions indicated at 44, 45', 46,

47, 48 and 49 and distinguished by letters A.

to F inclusive, each of these main-divisions is sub-divided to provide a plurality of subdivisions indicated at 50, 51, 52 and 53. This chart is u sed only on selection by the player before the use of chance devices as,

for instance, like those to be described, the selection being made preferably by moving the man or men onthe bases 3, 4` and 5 to the advanced positions 24, 25 and 26 before the use of such chance devices.

The chance devices illustrated in Figs. 3, 4 and 5 embody three cubes indicated at 54, 56 and 56. The cube 54 has its six sides provided with the letters A. to F, inclusive, the same as the characters distinguishing the divisions of the main chart, while the cubes 56 are duplicates of each other`and havev their six' faces provided with the numbers 1 to 6, inclusive. Vhen the main chart containing the divisions 27 to 32 is to be used, the uppermost faces of the cube 54 will indicate the main division of the chart on which the result is to be read, while'the sum of the uppermost faces of the two cubes 56` will indicate the sub-division of the main di-v vision to be used for determining the result. This result is then noted on the board by repositioning the men on the board and indicating the results on the score board if necessary. Should it be desired to use the chart having the main divisions 44 to 49 inclusive, then the cube 54 alone is used and, at the same time, the men on the bases'are moved tothe advanced positions 24, 25 or 26 or any one of all said positions. Of course,

this selection throw is only madewhen men are on the bases and that sub-division of the main division 44 to 49 is used which is most appropriate to the position of such men on the bases, the matter in the subdivisions in the main divisions 44 to 49 being such that only one ofsuch sub-divisions will I be -applicable to the positions of the men on the bases.

In Fig. 6 the chance devices and the charts are combined and, when .this structure is Vused', the board win ma be provided with the chart, buty may otherwise be the same as that shown in Fig. 1. In the embodimelt shown in Fig.l 6, a disk or plate 57 is employed and this disk or plate has a main chart formed by main divisions 27a to 32a, inclusive, which are the same as the main divisions on the chart illustrated in Fig. 1. There is 'also employed a selective chart having subdivisions 44? to 49"* which also has sub-divisions the same as the selective chart formed by main divisions/44 to 49 of Fig.f1. f

The chance devices of the embodiment shown in Fig. 6 may employ a rotary member 58 pivoted'at 59 to the center of the disk and having two pointers or indicators 60 and l61. The indicator 60 is adapted to operate over an annular series of numbers 62 spondingto the numbers of the sub-divisions of the main divisions 27ziL to 32a and each vmain division of theI chance devices being distinguished by characters, such as the letters 65, which also serve for distinguishing the main divisions 27il to 32a` of the chart. The indicator 60 is used to determine the result of a pitched ball with respect to the body or man representing the batter as well as the positiony of any men on bases. The indicator 61 operates over the subldivisions 44a to 49a of the elective chart, the letters 66 designating said chart also acting to point out through said indicator the main division of the elective chart to be used.

In the use of the embodiment shown iii- Fig. 6, 'a player spins the indicating member 58 and unless a selection is made previous to said spinning by the advancement of the men on the bases to the advanced positions 24, 25 and 26, then the player takes the result. of the indicator 60, which, cooperatin with the annular series of numbers 62, wil point 'out one number on one of the main divisions of the main chart and this number will in turn point out on the sub-division of the main divisions 27u to 32a, the result of the play. Should the player advance a man or men on bases to any-one or more of the advanced posit-ions 24 to 26, then he must follow the result pointed out by the indicator 61 on themost appropriate sub-division of the main divisions 44a to 49a of the elective chart.

there has been provided an improved game apparatus designed for playing a game closely resembling and simulating an actual.

From the 'foregoing it will be seen that game of professional baseball. This apparatus provides for any contingency that might occur in an actual game. It permits the player to put himself in the position of a captain or manager of a team and through the selective chart to exercise individual judgment based upon the position of the men on bases or the status of the game and of the score, so as to overcome the results of the chance devices upon the batter alone. It has been found that a player With a good knowledge of the professional baseball game can, 4through the selective chart, defeat a player `vvho is not so Well informed. The game apparatus can be used by the manager of a professional team to illustrate and instruct his players in judgment in individual and team play. The sub-divisions of the chart are so arranged that games are rarely found With more than the lovs7 score of a good game and in many instances games of more than the usual number of innings with low scores are frequent, thus increasing interest as the game proceeds and creating much excitement.

What I claim as my invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A game apparatus comprising a member provided with means representing a baseball field, a plurality of bodies adapted to be moved around the ield in simulation of the plays in baseball, a chart having a plurality of main divisions, each main division having a plurality of sub-divisions embracing a plurality of designations of plays, and a selective chart having a plurality of main divisions each embracing a plurality of designations of plays under different situations of the player, chance controlled means having indicia associated with the main divisions of both of said charts and indicia associated with the subdivision of the main divisions of the lirst mentioned chart.

2. A game apparatus comprising a game board provided with means representing a baseball eld including the bases, diamond and out eld and having adjacent to each of its three bases advance positions, a plurality of bodies adapted to be moved around the diamond in simulation of plays in baseball, a chart having a plurality of main divisions, each main division having a plurality of sub-divisions for ascertaining the result of a pitched ball on the batter and on the positions of men on the bases, indicia associated with the main divisions and also With the sub-divisions, a selective chart having a plurality of main divisions for ascertaining the result of a pitched ball on the batter also as Well as the bodies shifted to advance positions, indicia associated with' each of the main divisions of the selective chart, and chance devices having 1nd1c1a corresponding to the indicia associated with both charts. p

3. A game apparatus comprising a member having means representing a baseball field including the bases, diamond and outfield, a plurality of bodies adapted to be moved around the diamond in simulation of the plays in baseball, a chart having main divisions and sub-divisions under the main divisions, the main divisions being distinguished by a diferent type of characters than the sub-divisions, the characters distino'uishing the main divisions being all dierent and the characters distinguishing the subdivisions being the same in all main divisions, and chance devices having characters corresponding to the characters associated with said chart and permitting the selection of plays from said chart.

4. A game apparatus comprising a member provided with means representing a baseball ield, including the bases, diamond and outfield, a plurality of bodies adapted to be moved around the diamond in simulation of the plays in baseball, a main chart having main divisionsand subdivisions under theJ main divisions, the main divisions being distinguished by a different type of characters than the subdivisions, the characters distinguishing the main divisions being all different and the characters distinguishing the subdivisions being the same 1n all main divisions, a selective chart having main divisions with distinguishing characters and subdivisions under each main division provided with such matter that only one such lsubdivision will be applicable to the position of the men or bodies, and chance devices having characters corresponding to the characters associated With the charts, said chance devices employed in connection with the chart having selective means for pointing out the main divisions of thezselective chart. y

5. A game apparatus comprising a. game board having means thereon vfor indicating different positions, a body adapted to be moved to such different positions on the board, means for indicating the movement of the bodies to the positions, said means comprising a chart having main divisions and subdivisions under the main divisions, the main divisions being distinguished by a different type of characters than the subdivisions, the characters distinguishing the main divisions being all different and the characters distinguishing the subdivisions being the same in all main divisions, and chance devices having characters corresponding to the characters associated with the chart to permit a selection ofplays from the chart.

THEODORE KISOR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2528029 *Nov 18, 1946Oct 31, 1950Educational Toy CompanyBall game employing a cube containing a pair of dice
US2606029 *Dec 18, 1948Aug 5, 1952Oscar W EschParlor baseball game
US2825564 *Aug 2, 1956Mar 4, 1958Jack C KieferBaseball game apparatus
US2933316 *Jul 14, 1958Apr 19, 1960Serafino J ManciniGame
US3224773 *Apr 15, 1963Dec 21, 1965Kenneth J RoedTable baseball game board
US3235261 *Nov 1, 1962Feb 15, 1966Doherty Edmond JBaseball game having resiliently actuated spinner
US4060246 *Apr 25, 1977Nov 29, 1977Ward Leslie JHorse-race-simulating parlor or casino game of pure chance
US4708344 *Feb 17, 1987Nov 24, 1987Wyatt Hugh JBaseball game apparatus
US4822043 *Mar 25, 1987Apr 18, 1989Carter Lewis SBaseball card game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/244.1, 273/141.00R
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00031
European ClassificationA63F3/00A4B