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Publication numberUS1553721 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1925
Filing dateJun 25, 1923
Priority dateJun 25, 1923
Publication numberUS 1553721 A, US 1553721A, US-A-1553721, US1553721 A, US1553721A
InventorsScholz Maria
Original AssigneeScholz Maria
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Batik art
US 1553721 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Sept. 15, 15325.

UNITED STATES MARIA SCHOLZ, OF LEICHLINGEN, GERMANY.

- BATIK Ana.

Io Drawing.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, MARIA 'SoHoLz, acitizen of Germany, residing at Leichlingen, Rhenish Prussia, Germany, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in the Batik Art, for which I have filed an application for patent in Germany, June 29, 1922, and of which the following is a specification.

In the batik art, as well known, the textile fabric is first provided with a wax pattern and is then dyed, the waxed portions, which do not absorb the dyestufl', retaining their original color tone. The-wax is subsequently suitably removed. Further, in

cloth-printing it is known to print upon the dyed fabric a pattern by means of a discharge medium, the latter by bleaching the ground color at the places so imprinted then producing the pattern.

These decolored prints, which have become very popular in the cloth-printing industry, have so far not been found usable -to' any extent in the batik art for the main reason that the fabric imprinted with the discharge pattern must finally be treated in a I steam chamber or the Mather-Flatt apparatus to fix the colors. If goods pattern partly with discharge and partly with wax would be thus steamed the wax, obviously, would melt and spread over the discharged portions since the discharges, as usually compounded for the imprinting process, do not possess sufficient wax repelllng power to prevent this, with the result that the goods subsequently could not properly be dyed, or the wax would run off so quickly that the discharge would have no time to destroy the dyestulf.

The present invention is based principally on the discovery that the discharges employed in the cloth-printing art, especially the hydrosulphites, such as for instance the formaldehydsulfoxylat which is known as rongalit, which are employable for most all dischargeable dyes and for all fabrics, can be very well utilized in the batik art. It has been found that when the discharge-patterned material is passed through" a wax bath heated to about 80 degrees centigrade, the dyestufl' is "readily and effectively destroyed at the discharged places, the destruction of the dye being not only complete but also practically Application filed June 25, 1923. Serial No. 647,760.

' instantaneous, whereas in the old steaming process at least 5 minutes were required to bring this about.

I will now describe in detail the severalbest results and turn out high-grade work of the character set forth.

If, for instance, a red pattern is desired on a green ground, the entire piece of fabric is first dyed green in well known manner, whereupon the pattern is imprinted upon it with a suitable discharge, as well known 'in the art, on the printing machine, by hand, or by stenciling or otherwise. For reasons further below given it is necessary to add to the discharge a wax repellant, such as for instance tragacanth thickening, which has been found eminently suitable.

When employing the above specified rongalit as discharge medium the following combination will be found suitable: 100 grams rongalit, 350 grams gum,'100 grams water, 500 grams tragacanth thickening, comprising a solution of about parts tragacanth in 1000 parts water.

This formula is given merely by way of example, having been found eminently suitable for the purpose, and, obviously, variations in the composition may be made within limits; for instance I may omit the admixture of the gum in certain instances.

The discharge-patterned fabric is then passed through a hot wax bath in which the ground is waxed, whereupon the fabric is placed into a cold water bath, wherein the waxed portions will set'and the wax-free discharged portions are thoroughly rinsed and thus freed of the discharge. Next, the fabric is manipulated in the manner well known in the batik art, to produce fine cracks and fissures in the cold wax layer. The fabric is then passed into the second dye bath, which in our case would be red, 100

wherein the discharged and thus wax-free portions representing the pattern are dyed and then show the pattern in red, whilst at the same time the dye penetrates through the breaks and fissures and produces on the 105 waxed fabric portions the vein or marble effeet so highly valued in the batik art.

The discharged portions will show the pattern in the pure red tone, but the veining will show a compound coloring of the red of the pattern and the'green of the ground. The dyeing process being completed, the wax is removed from the fabric in suitable manner, for instance by hot-ironing or dissolving-out. The finished product shows a red pattern on a green base with the latter showing veins of the combination of the two colors. In order that the discharged portions are thoroughly permeated by the dye of the second bath, care must be taken to. keep these fabric portions devoid of wax. This can best be obtained by adding to the discharge a'tragacanth thickening or a similarwax repelling medium.

If it is desired to produce an additional pattern, and this also on the'wax-free discharged pattern, the fabric, after having left the second color (red) bath, can again be passed through a second wax bath wherein the entire fabric is impregnated and covered with the wax. If now this, second wax coating is hardened in cold water and the fabric then gathered to produce cracks and breaks and is then introduced into a third color bath, then an additional marble effect is obtained extending over the entire fabric including the previously discharged portions and showing a compound color effect depending upon the color tone of the ground at these portions.

A further patterning may be obtained by imprinting, beside the discharge pattern, a second pattern with a wax repellant, for instance a tragacanth thickening, but without discharge admixture. Thepattern' thus produced will show the combination coloring of the ground with the second dye bath color, that is to say, the same tint as the veins showing on the colored ground. The application of these two imprints canalso be effected simultaneously in the well known multi-color printing press. In producing discharge patterns by the imprinting machine the engraved portion of the roller should preferably to sunk at least 1 millimeter deeper than usual.

The above process 1s of special value in the'treatment of heavy fabrics, such as woolplush, velvet and the like, since in the dye bath the pattern is completely dyed through, a result unobtainable when the patterning is produced with printing dye.

What I claim is 1. In the batik art, the described step which comprises patterning the pre-dyed material, prior to treating it in a wax bath, with a discharge containing a wax repellant.

2. In the batik art, the described steps which comprise patterning the predyed ma terial with rongalit having an admixture of a wax repellant,. and then passing the thus patterned material into a wax bath.

In the batik art, the described steps which comprise patterning the predyed material with a discharge thickened with tragacanth, and then passing the thus patterned material into a wax bath.

4. In the batik art, the described steps which comprise patterning the predyed material with a discharge medium containing a wax repellant, passing the thus patterned material through a wax bath, suitably breaking the wax, passing the material through a dye bath, and finally dewaxing the material.

5. In the batik art, the described steps which comprise patterning the predyed material partly with a discharge thickened with a wax repellant, and partly with a plain wax repellant, and then passing the thus patterned material through a wax bath.

6. In the batik art, the described steps which comprise patterning the predyed materialpartly with a discharge containing a wax repellant, and partly with a tragacanth thickening, and then passing the thus patterned material through a wax bath.

7. In the batik art, the described steps which comprise patterning the predyed material with a discharge having incorporated therein a wax repellant, and then passing the thus patterned fabric into a wax bath heated to about 80 0.

8. In the batik art, the described steps which comprise patterning the predyed ma terial partly with a discharge containing a wax repellant, and partly with a plain wax repellant, and then passing the thus patterned material into a wax bath heated to about 80 C.

9. In the batik art, the described steps which comprise patterning the predyed ma-. terial with a discharge composed of 1 part by weight of rongalit and 5 parts of tragacanth thickening, and then passing the thus patterned material into a wax bath.

10. In the batik art, the described steps which comprise patterning the predyed material with adischarge composed of 1 partby weight of rongalit, 3 parts of gum, 1 part of water, and 5 parts tragacanth thickening, and then passing the thus patterned material into a wax bath.

11. In the batik art, the described steps which comprise patterning the predyed material with a discharge of 1 part by weight of rongalit, 3% parts of gum, 1 part of water, and 5 parts of tragacanth thickening, I

first dye' bath, patterning the dyed material I in part with a discharge containinga wax repellant, and in part with a plain repellant, passing the thus patternedf'material through the wax bath, breaking the wax,

treating the fabric in a" second dye bath,

and finally dewaxing the fabric.

13. In the batik art, the described.. st .ps

which comprise treating the material in a dewaxing the fabric, passing the fabric first dye bath, patterning the dyed material through a second wax bath, again breaking in part with a discharge containing a wax the wax, treating the fabric in a third dye 10 repellant, and in part with a plain wax rebath, and finally dewaxing the fabric.

5 pellant, passing the thus patterned material In testimony whereof I afiix my signature.

through a Wax bath, breaking the wax, I treating the fabric in a second dye bath, MARIA SCHOLZ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4254520 *Sep 29, 1978Mar 10, 1981Saurman Judith BBatik process and apparatus
US5201915 *Jul 11, 1991Apr 13, 1993Golden Trade S.R.L.Coating fabrics or clothing with melted wax, cooling, random breaking, immersion in aqueous bleach solutions
US6878171 *Feb 19, 2003Apr 12, 2005Scott BallMethod for forming a distinct pattern in an article of apparel
Classifications
U.S. Classification8/447, 8/929, 8/917, 8/457
International ClassificationD06P5/15
Cooperative ClassificationY10S8/917, Y10S8/929, D06P5/155
European ClassificationD06P5/15C