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Publication numberUS1554534 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 22, 1925
Filing dateJul 6, 1923
Priority dateJul 6, 1923
Publication numberUS 1554534 A, US 1554534A, US-A-1554534, US1554534 A, US1554534A
InventorsStraussler Nicholas
Original AssigneeInternat Silencer Company Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Silencer for gaseous currents
US 1554534 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 22, 1925.

N. STRAUSSLER SILENCER FOR GASEOUS CURRENTS.

F11od July 192s Patented Sept. 22, 1925.

, v 1,554,534 PATENT OFFICE.

NICHOLAS STRAUSSLER, OF LONDON, ENGLAND, ASSIGNOR TO INTERNATIONAL SILENGER COMPANY, LIMITED, OF LONDON, ENGLAND.

SILENCE-ZR. FOR GASEOUS CURRENTS.

Application filed. July 6, 1923. Serial No. 649,847.

ful Improvements in Silencers for Gaseous placed into or removed from the silencer Currents, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to silencers for gaseous currents such as are produced in the exhaust of internal combustion engines, where successive explosions set up violent sound waves, the periodicity of which it is required to eliminate by breaking up the intermittently delivered volumes of gas into a level uniform flow.

According to this invention the body of the silencer is made in parts connected together by means that permit of their being readily separated or displaced in such manner as to render the internal operative parts easily accessible. The said internal operative parts are in the naturev of a permeable metallic resilient structure which may be in the form of cartridges or rolls or bundles of loosely packed metal capable of being bodily body and serving when in place to permit the passage of the gases while equalizing their flow without oifering such obstruction as would create undue back pressure.

In order that the said invention may be clearly understood and readily carried into efi'ect the same will now be described more fully with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 represents in longitudinal section a silencer embodying this invention.

Figure 2 is an elevation of the said silencer viewed from the left-hand end of Figure 11.

Figure 3- illust-rates a detail hereinafter mentioned.

In the example illustrated the body of the silencer is composed of two separable parts or sections A and B of stamped metal, which may be. of equal length, but are preferably of difi'erent lengths as shown, in order that, in the mass production of standard parts, three sizes of silencers may be made by combining two long, two short, or one long and one short section. In the case 'ofa very long silencer, a central cylindrical section may be interposed between two end sections to obtain the required length, the body of the casing thus being constructed of three instead of two sections. Each section of the cylindrical body in the case of two sections or each end section when threesect-ions are employed, terminates in a cylindrical neck (0, D) of reduced. diameter; the neck G at the entrance end may be adapted for connection with the exhaust pipe of the engine by extruding radially a hollow wing E, through a hole F in which may pass freely a screw threaded bolt G, and by means of a wing nutH on the end of this bolt the neck O can be tightened on to the exhaust pipe. The necks at both ends of the silencer body may beprovided with such hollow wings, but may be of different sizes, to enable the silencer to be reversed for attachment to either of two exhaust pipes of different diameters, the inoperative wing at the outlet end not interfering with the action of the silencer. Inden'tations J (Figure 2) may be formed in the neck C adjacent to the larger or body part of the section A to act as stops preventing the exhaust pipe from entering the said body. On the opposing end of each of the sections A and B are rims or beads M, N, which in assembling are embraced by a clip K of channel section, this clip being then tightened by means of a bolt P and wing nut R. The connections between the end sections and central section in a three-part silencer may comp-rise similar rims and clips. The internal operative part of the silencer constituted by the aforesaid permeable metallic resilient structure is in this example in the form of a cartridge S, comprising a bundle of very narrow and thin strips of flexible metal enclosed in a foraminous, reticulated bag or cover ,made of sheet material such as netting or loosely knitted or woven fabric made of the same or other suitable material. Instead of one cartridge a number of them made in short lengths may be used, the number employed depending upon the length of the silencer. Instead of cartridges'composed of bundles of thin strips of flexible metal as aforesaid, cartridges composed of a roll of two or other suitable number of sheets of expanded metal may be used, each sheet of expanded metal being made as is well understood by scoring and slitting a blank sheet of metal which is then metal prior to being rolled up may he relatively displaced to the extent of half the pitch or spacing of the apertures therein, Alternatively the roll may be composed of metal netting, or the cartridge may be composed of strip metal as aforesaid with an outer casing oi expanded metal. However cartridges made up in the form of the narrow and thin strips of flexible metal as aforesaid are considered referable owing to their being resilient in all directions, whereas the roll form is only radially resilient. The metal used in either case should be out a high melting point and resistant to corrosion.

In order to increase the surface of the cartridge S exposed to theincoming gases, ribs or iiutings T (Figure 1) may be formed in the body section A of the silencer, under which ribs the cartridge fits, so that portions of the sides as well as the end of the can tridge will receive the said directly. 'lhese ribs or flutings may reachtio the neck C as shown in Figure 1 and periorgi also the function of the, indentations J pre iously mentioned. vWhen. the cartridge .is in the form of a roll of expanded metal it will present a ridged surface, so that the ribs or tlutings on the body section All. will not be necessary.

Carbon particles travelling with the gases, having a greater inertia than that of the gases themselves, tend to impinge on' the centre oi the cartridge or other filling, and in order to promote this tendency and to keep the periphery of the filling as clean as ssible, a recess or depression, indicated by chain dotted lines-at W in Figure 1, may be formed at the entrance end of the filling, so that the carbon particles which do not blow through are retained in and around this recess.

Although the said silencer has been shown in the accompanying drawings as divided transversely into two parts held together by a clip of channel section engaging with rims or beads on the parts or sections of the silencer, it is to be understood that the invention is not intended to be limited to this manner of dividing the silencer into parts and of connecting them together. It is to be understood that in the claims where the expression permeable metallic resilicnt structure is used, such expression is intended to cover any of the various forms of the internal operative parts of the silencer heretofore referred to. Y i

What I claim andv desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is 1. A silencer for gaseous currents, comprising a body portionbuilt of readily detachable sections, and a filling consisting of a permeable homogeneous tangled mass of very narrow and thin ribbons of flexible metallic material enclosed in a metal bag made of ioraminous reticulated sheet material adapted to fit bodily into the said body portion, said bag being composed of stiffer and stronger material than that of which the filling consists. L

2. A. silencer for gaseous currents, cornprising a body portion built of readily detachable sections, and a filling consisting of a permeable homogeneous tangled mass of.

very narrow and thin ribbons of flexible metallic material enclosed in a metal bag made of ioraminous reticulated sheet material adapted to fit bodily into the said body ortion.

3. silencer for gaseous currents, com

prising a, body portion built of readily dein diameter at the outer ends of said body,

a neck at the inlet end to receive the end of a pipe leading the gaseous currents to said silencer, internal projections on said neck to limit the extent to which said pipe can enter said neck, a filling consisting of a tangled mass of very narrow and thin strips of flexible metal enclosed in a reticulated metal bag adapted to fit bodily in the said body and ribs at the entrance end of said body for exposing portions of the sides as well as the end of said filling to the incoming gaseous currents.

5., A silencer for gaseous currents comprising a substantially cylindrical body made in readily detachable sections of unequal lengths and reduced in diameter at the outer ends of said body, a neck at the inlet end to receive the end of a ipe leading the gaseous currents to said si encer, 1n-

ternal projections on said neck to limit the extent to which said pipe can enter said neck, a filling consisting of a permeable homogeneous mass of metallic material of a resilient character such as a. tangled mass of very narrow and thin strips of flexible metal enclosed in a reticulated metal bag adapted to fit bodily in the said body, and ribs at the entrance end of said body for exposing ortions of the sides as well as the end of S816. filling to the incoming gaseous currents. A

NICHOLAS STRAUSSLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2524588 *May 4, 1949Oct 3, 1950Charles E BechtelSpark arrester
US2600219 *May 26, 1949Jun 10, 1952Paul E DiederichCrankcase ventilator filter
US3105570 *Apr 17, 1962Oct 1, 1963Bezemes NicholasInternal combustion engine exhaust muffler
US3129078 *Jun 16, 1961Apr 14, 1964Marian L HobbsExhaust muffler filter
US4319660 *Sep 2, 1980Mar 16, 1982The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyMechanical noise suppressor for small rocket motors
US4530418 *Sep 27, 1984Jul 23, 1985Currie Neil LAutomotive exhaust system
US4947957 *Jun 16, 1989Aug 14, 1990Multiform Desiccants, Inc.Regenerable desiccant cartridge for automotive muffler
US4993512 *Sep 9, 1988Feb 19, 1991Glaenzer SpicerExhaust duct part in particular for an internal combustion engine
US5036948 *Jan 5, 1990Aug 6, 1991Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AgSound absorption device or muffler for blow nozzles
US6053276 *Jun 9, 1998Apr 25, 2000D'amico, Jr.; JohnMuffler packing method with injection of cartrided continuous filament fiberglass
US6068082 *Nov 21, 1997May 30, 2000D'amico, Jr.; JohnMuffler packing method and apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification181/258, 55/515, 55/DIG.210, D12/194
International ClassificationF01N1/10, F01N1/08, F01N13/18
Cooperative ClassificationF01N1/082, F01N1/10, F01N13/1805, Y10S55/21
European ClassificationF01N1/10, F01N1/08C, F01N13/18B