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Publication numberUS1555003 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 29, 1925
Filing dateSep 27, 1923
Priority dateSep 27, 1923
Publication numberUS 1555003 A, US 1555003A, US-A-1555003, US1555003 A, US1555003A
InventorsGreenberg Geza, Stoye Kurt
Original AssigneeKny Scheerer Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Urethroscope
US 1555003 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. GREENBERG ET AL unmnnoscors Filed Sept 27, 1923 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Sept. 29 1925.

v1,555,003 G. GREENBERG ET AL' 1 URETHROSCOPE Filed Sept. 27, 1923 2 Sheets-Sheet Patented Sept. 29, 1925.

UNITED STATES PATENT eEz'A GREENBERG, of NEW YORK, AN'D KURT sir oYe, crrntrsume, NEW YORK, As

SIGNORS TO THE KNY-SCHEERER CORPORATION N. Y., A CORPORATION or NEW YORK.

URETHRosooPE.

Application'fiiedSeptenilier27, 1553. S eria1No.65 ,d67-.

To ciZZivZzbm it mm 7 t Be it known that WGLGEZAQ GREENBEBG and K T SToYE, both citizens 071: theUnit-ed' Stat-es, residing, respectively, at NevvYprk city, county of Ne'W York, State of New York, and Flushing, Long Island, county of Queens, State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in" a Urethroscope, of which the following is a specification. I I

This'invent-ion relates to an improvement in a urethroscope and the novelty consists in theadaptation and arrangement of :arts as will be more fully hereinafter pointed out. This device is particularly an improve ment of the urethroscope of Greenberg & WVinter described and claimed in United States Letters Patent No. 1,453,)75, or May 1, 1923', and reference ma be made to that patent to cover the general operation of urethroscopes, p v I Great difiiculty has been found in' the use of urethroscopes in lookinginto the bladder ccvity or other cavity to be examined be 2 cause of the lack of an adjustable telescope which difiiculty our device has o veiceme y combining with a urethroscope a collapsible telescope Which can he swung into position for use when. desired or swung out of positionso as to be out of the ay as may be required, and also be detachabl'y reinoved Anotherhandicap in the use of urethroscopes hasheen in the failure to eliminate bubbles occi lrrilig in the Water which is used to inflate the! organ to be examined, and which obstruct the vision of the o erator. Our device has overcome this difficulty and furnishes-means lofre'ady eliliiination of such bubbles Without disturbing the" m-euuescope and other instruments therein during the operation; a

Our device also furnishes an eccentiiic coupling thereby permitting the use of va rious sizes of tubes Withoutlosing the aline- 4 ment necessary for sighting through the eye piece of the urethrosoope.

Or device also furnishes a more perfect connection for the lighting Ineans so" as to secure perfect contact under all conditions, and also embodies a: sliding depth" gauge which enables the operator to definitely deterinine the depth of the insertion of the urethros cope and a; aefinituy eer-min are exact amount it must emevea where a change'yis required. 6 e Referring to the drawings, Fig. 1 is a top plan view of our improved urethroscope which has been broken for convenience in illustration, and Whichshmvs the collapsible telescope svg' uiig out Of IP OSltlO'Il, as whee not in use, and showing itiii position for use in dotted outline; a

} Fig-2 1s a vertical section ottour completedevice; i f a Fig. 3is1a: vertical section or the eccentric couplinggand I 7 I Fig. 4 is an end vi'evv of Fig. 3 looking in at the right; e u t Fig. detail: or thelightcarrieri;

Fig, 6 is a oross s'ect'iori of the air outlet and eyepiece; and

7 is a detail ofanalteriiativelspring valve to he used as an Menage.

8 is a urethral, tube to vvhichli's secured an eccentriccoup-ling 9,:i11'd a'inain body 10 of our device isadapted.to 'be rigidly secured to said couplingf) in which there is a water inlet 11 having a valve ,12 controlling the same; Eye piece 13 is also rigidly mounted .in the body 10 and" has tlie usual lens 14. In eyepiece 13 there is alsohioimted in flange 156a set screw 16 of usual construction and which is adapted to serve as an one let for air bubbles forin-ing tiiivspace 617 on 1 the inside ofth'e lens 14. A collapsible telescope 118' of usual construction is r'nou'nted 0 11 the body 10 by means of a bracket 19 which is removahly' secured to a screw clamp 20, the has efo'fwhich is iiiteg-ral With the bpdy' 10. A sliding depurgaugeei ismou'iitd' on the tube sand has. a slot 22 permitting the operatorjito see divisional marks 23 on the tube '8 so, that the sliding 9x11516521 can he moved to'th'e exact position vv'hih is to locate it "so as to serve; as a depth] gauge for the insertion of the tube 8. Through the base or the body 10 a lightingvvire 24 of usual cons'truotion is adapted to be mounted so" as to pass through a lighting tube 25" which is adapted to lie along the haseof the inside of the tube lighting tubeiQZB termina't esin an internal threetdingfiti into which is adapted to he threaded a cbiitain merriper 27 having an opening 28 and in which or AMEmcA, or new YORK,

opening 32 in the opposite end of the con tainer member 27 from the opening 28. A lamp 33 of usual construction having a threaded socket 34 is adapted to be mounted in the internal threading 26 until a contact nipple 35 at the base of said socket34 is registered in contact with the sliding member 32. This construction assures the contact of the wire .24 with the plate 29 and through the spring and sliding member 31 always ensures contact with the contact nipple 35 in spite of variationswhich might otherwise break the contact were it not for the sliding member '32 which under spring pressure 30 will always ride up into contact with the co-ntactnipple 35, thus assuring a light during the entire operation and eliminating the possibility of the failure of the light through the breaking of the contact.

The eccentric nipple 9 has a boring 36 which is eccentric so as to assure the alinement of the lens 14' and telescope 18 so that the vision of the operator will always be clear through the tube 8 and so thatthe lighting tube 25 will always lie at the base out of the way of possibility of obstructing the vision of the operator. A larger tube is noted in dottedoutline as 37in Fig. 4 thus always assuring the largest possible amount of unobstructed space through the tube 8 .for'the vision of the operator. i

Figs. 6 and 7 show further modifications 'or alternativeforms for the air outlet in which, as is shown in Fig. 6, a nipple 38 has an internal threading 39 adapted to screw into an internally mounted boring 40 inthe eye piece 13, said nipple 38 having an internal threading 41 in which the screw 42 is adapted to be seated so as to control the outlet 43 in the nipple '38.. Fig. 7 shows a springv valve member having a base 44 adapted to be rigidly mounted in the eye piece 13' having a valve seat 45 in which a valve 46 is adapted normally to seat under pressure of spring 47 said base 44having an outlet 48 so that air or bubbles formed in chamber 1 7 may pass out through said valve 44 when it is open, orthrough Valve 42 when it is open, or throughvalve 16 when it is 'open, these three being alternative forms of valves. In using this device the tube 8 will be inserted into the'urethra in the usual way and the bladder will then be distended by turning on the water ininlet 11, which is controlled by valve 12, until the bladder is suificiently distended. The operator can then swing thetelescope 18 into position for 1 observationand the light 33 will illuminate 'the cavity being examined so that the operator can use the instrument desired upon removing eye piece 13 and if the telescope 18 is in the way it can be swung to one side temporarily or it can be readily removed. The light 33 will not flicker and vary because of imperfect contact but will burn steadily as the contact will always be maintained steadily'by the sliding member-31 which insures a positive perfect contact in spite of any variation which may be caused by jars or movement of parts. Also by opening air pressure valves 16, 42 or 44 which can be easily and quickly done by the operator without disturbing the operation, all bubbles gathering on the inside of lens 14 may be eliminated thereby assuring a clear vision at all times.

It "will be understood that although this device is called a urethroscope, it is also adapted to be used in the other natural body openings and the use of such na meis not intended to in any way limit the scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. In a urethroscope, the combination of ably attached to the body of said urethroscope and a sliding depth gauge mounted on said tube.

2. In a urethroscope, the combination of a urethral tube having an external scale thereon, an eccentric coupling, an eyepiece, 1 i

a water inlet means, an a1r outlet valve, a collapsible telescope removably and adjustably attached to the body of said urethrolOU scope, a sliding depth gauge mounted on said tube, and means for lighting the distal end of said tube.

3. In a urethroscope adapted ,for water inflation of the organ to be examined, a tube having an external scale thereon and a sliding depth gauge mounted on said tube, a collapsible telescope secured to the body'of said urethroscope so that it can be readily swung into or out of position for use and be readily removed therefrom and means for lighting the distal end of said tube.

4. In a urethroscope, the combination of a urethral tube] having an external scale thereon, an eccentric coupling, an eyepiece, a water inlet, an air outlet valve, a collapsible telescope removably and adjustably attached to the body of said urethroscope and a sliding depth gauge mounted on said tube, and means for lighting the distal end of said tube comprising a bulb connected to the power wire by a slidable member under inflation of the organ to be examined, a tube having an external scale thereon and a slidmg depth gauge mountedon sald tube, a

collapsible telescope secured to the body of said urethroscope so that it can be readily swung into or out of position for use and be readily removed therefrom, and means for lighting the distal end of said tube comprising a bulb connected to the power Wire by a slidable member under constant spring pressure against the contact point of said bulb, said spring resting on a plate in contact with said poWer Wire.

In testimony whereof We aflix our signatures.

GEZA GREENBERG. KURT STO'YE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5123402 *Aug 25, 1989Jun 23, 1992Ben VandenbosscheMedical instrument shield
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/117, 600/162
International ClassificationA61B1/12, A61B1/307
Cooperative ClassificationA61B1/12, A61B1/307, A61B1/06, A61B1/00135
European ClassificationA61B1/307, A61B1/00H4, A61B1/12