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Publication numberUS1555960 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 6, 1925
Filing dateNov 10, 1924
Priority dateNov 10, 1924
Publication numberUS 1555960 A, US 1555960A, US-A-1555960, US1555960 A, US1555960A
InventorsClarence W Fuller
Original AssigneeClarence W Fuller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sanitary protector
US 1555960 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 6, 1925. 1,555,960

C. W. FULLER SANITARY PROTECTOR Filed Nov. 10, 1924 INVENTOR ATTORNEYS Patented 0d. 6, 1925.

CLARENCE W. FULLER, 0F YONKERS, NEW YORK.

SANITARY PROTECTOR.

Application filed November 10, 1924. Serial No. 748,848.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, CIARENCE IV. a citizen of the United Ashburton Avenue, Yonkers, in the county of Westchester, State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Sanitary Protectors; and I do hereby declare the followin to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

My invention relates ,to a sanitary protector intended to take the place of ordinary adhesive tape and bandages, as a means for protecting minor injuries and skin abrasions against infection or further injury. My invention consists essentially of a small strip of material of such shape, dimensions and composition that it can be applied to the hand or any other part of the body with the greatest case, a distinct advantage of my invention being that it in no way interferes with normal use of the member to which the protector is applied. This makes the invention of particular value to golfers, tennis players and others who find it essential to have the free use of their hands at all times. The ditliculties involved in adequately protectin a blister or other injury to the hand wit out interfering with the normal use of the injured member are well known. \Vhere it is necessar to continue using the injured member, it LS practically useless to try and protect the injured spot. with the sanitary appliances now in general use. If ordinary adhesive tape or bandages are employed, they seriously interfere with the freedom of movement if they are applied so as to protect the injured spot to the desired extent. \Vhere the injured member is used after the sanitary protector is applied, the protector pulls away from the injured spot and instead of protecting the injury, it serves as a pocket for collecting a large amount of dirt which is brought into direct contact with the wound.

The principal object of my invention is to provide a sanitary protector which will fit snugly over any injured spot and at the same time permit entire freedom of movement of the injured member. My improved protector is provided with a pad intended to Form, States, residing at 72 cover the injured spot completely and one or more retaining strips adapted to be fixed in position in a variety of ways so as to hold the pad firmly. in position. I prefer to construct my sanitary protector so that the center of the pad is located on one side of the center line on the retaining strip or strips, thus making the protector of considerable value as a means for protecting ablister or other injury on the palm of the hand at the base of a finger. I also prefer to provide an adhesive surface on the retaining strip or strips for the purpose of fixing the retaining means in place and I have found that the protector is most efiicient from the standpoint of applying it to the injured part with the greatest ease, when the protector is provided with anadhesive on a surface which comes in contact with the skin. It is often-times desirable to prevent the pro tector from adhering to the injured spot as it always does where ordinary adhesive tape is employed, and for this reason it is oftentimes desirable to have the adhesive applied to the protector only on certain restricted areas which do not come in contact With the wound.

A further object of my invention is to provide a protector of the character above described which will not become soiled, either while it is bein handled or carried in the pocket, or after 1t has been applied to an injured member. A further object of my invention is to provide a protector which can be readily carried about Without occup ing too much space and which is always rea y to be used without any preparation. Accordingly, I prefer to provide a series of protectors-connected together end to end in the form of a continuous strip which can be rolled into a compact coil or wound onto a suitable spool or card. When it is desired to use a protector, the outside protector is unwrapped and severed from the remaining protectors as will be readily understood. To make this operation as simple as possible, I prefer to provide scored or otherwise weakened transverse lines between the adjacent protectors so that the protectors can be readily torn apart.

An additional feature of my invention consists in providing a layer of antiseptic powder on the portion of the protector which comes in direct contact with the wound. The powder serves a double function in that it prevents the protector from adhering to the wound and at the same time it serves as a means for sterilizing the wound.

The etails of several embodiments of my invention are set forth in the accompanying drawings and in the following detailed description which is to be considered in conjunction with these drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a plan view of one form of my improved protector.

igure 2 is a perspective view of a hand having the protector applied to one finger thereof.

Figure 3 is a similar view of the back of the hand shown in Figure 2, illustrating the manner in which the protector is held in place.

Figure 4 is a perspective view of one form of the improved protector.

Figure 5 is a vertical section view taken on line 5-5 of Figure 4:.

Figure 6 is a perspective view of a number of protectors in the. form of a continuous strip wound into a coil.

igure 7 is an elevation of another coil of protectors, the adjacent protectors being separated by'scored lines.

Figure 8 is a plan view of a strip of protectors of aform slightly different from that shown in the preceding figures.

Figure 9 is a plan View of a strip of protectors, showin the construction of this particular form 0 protector.

Figure 10 is a plan view of a single protector having a portion thereof covered ,with an antiseptic powder.

Figure 11 is a perspective view of the protector shown in igure 10.

The rotector shown in Figure 1 consists of a pa 1 and retaining strips 2 and 3 and it will be noticed at once that the center of the pad 1 is located to one side of the center line of retaining stri s 2 and 3. This construction is pre erre because it makes the protector of articular value as a means for coveri a lister or other injury on the palm of the and at the base of a finger. When used for this particular pu ose. the protector is applied as shown in igures 2 and 3 where it will be noted that the pad 1 projects out over the injured portion of the palm of the hand and the retaining stri s 2 and 3 are wrapped around a finger. T ese strips are preferably long enough so that when the are wrapped around the finger, they over ap in the manner shown in Figure 3. One or both of the adjacent surfaces of the overla ped portions should be provided with an a hesive so that these parts will adhere to each other.

Upon referring again to Figure i, it will be noticed that the width of the retaining stri s 2 and 3 is substantially less than that of t 1e pad 1. for the reason that the narrow retaining This construction is preferred strips, while serving as a most efiicient means for holding the pad in place, do not in any way interfere with the freedom of movement of the member to which they are attached. The protector may of course be provided with only one retaining strip instead of two retaining strips as shown in Figure 1. Where a sin le retaining strip is employed it should be ong enough so that it will extend entirely around a linger and enga e the back of the pad 1 covering the injure spot. This is objectionable, however, because it necessarily increases the thickness of the portion of the protector covering the wound and this would naturally interfere to some extent with the freedom of movement of the injured part. For this reason it is preferred to provide two retaining strips which can be secured together in the manner shown in Figure 3, at a point remote from the injury.

While I have illustrated my improved protecting shield as applied to the finger, it must be remembered that this shield can be used as a means for rotecting an injury on any part of the b0 y. M improved pro; tector is superior to the or inary protective devices even where used for the purpose of covering an injured spot-located at a point remote from the fingers. The narrow retaining strips do not wrinkle and pull away from the skin as is the case with ordinar adhesive tape which is of uniform widt throughout. The ad 1 fits snugly over the injured spot and t e retaining strips 2 and 3 serve as a most efficient means for holding the pad 1 in place.

T e retaimng strip or strips may be integral with the pad 1 as shown in the accompany' drawings or the strips may be separate pieces of material connected to the pad in any desired manner. I refer the integral construction because it r uces the thickness of the material covering the injured spot and because it is easier to make the protector out of a single piece of material than out of a number of pieces.

My improved sanitary protector can be i made out of an one of a considerable variety of materia The protector shown in Fi res 1 to 5 inclusive is made out of partia ly cured rubber. This material is quite satisfactory because it is elastic, it retains its sha and it sses the peculiar propert 0 being tac enough to adhere to itsel but not to the skin. Thus when itis wrapped around the finger as shown in Figures 2 and 3, the rubber does not adhere to the finger at any point, but the two overlapping retaining strips do adhere to each 0t er quite firmly.

The grade of rubber which I prefer to employ is a sheet rubber generally known to the trade and used for a variety of purposes such as an insulating wrapping for electrical conductors. The tackiness of the rubber is due to the' fact that it is incompletely cured, an insufiicient amount of sulphur having been used or else the heat treatment has not been carried out so as to make all of the sulphur employed combine with the rubber. Where the latter condition exists, the uncombined sulphur gradually comes to the surface and would impair the adhesive qualities of the surface if precautions were not taken to prevent this result. I find. that the sulphur bloom does not interfere with the adhesive properties of the rubber if the rubber is lined on both sides with paper or some similar material. In Figure 4. I have shown a lining of paper 4 on each side of the rubber constituting the protector. In making the protector, a rubber sheet can be lined on both sides with paper and then the protector is cut out of the sheet or strip of rubber in any well known manner. This leaves a lining of paper on each side of the rubber protector and this serves as a means for preserving the surface of the rubber until the protector is to be used. When the aper liners are stripped from the rubber, the protector can be wrapped around a finger and the overlapping retaining strips will adhere to each other and hold the protector in place.

In Figure 6 I have shown a roll or coil consisting of a single strip of protectors arranged end to end. This strip can be cut or torn apart so as to form protectors having a single retaining strip 2, or the strip can be severed at points midway between adjacent pads 1 so as to form protectors each having two retaining strips as shown in Figure 1 for example. The stri shown in Figure 6 may be made of partial y cured rubber or it may be made of other material such as adhesive tape. The strip can be perforated at intervals as indicated at 5 in Figure 7 or otherwise weakened at certain points so as to make it easy to tear the strip apart. Where my improved protector is made out of adhesive tape or other material which adheres to the skin, it is much more satisfactory to use than ordinary adhesive tape because the area covered by the adhesive is reduced to a minimum. When adhesiv tape is pulled off from the skin, some of the adhesive necessarily remains; hence it is desirable to have the adhesive confined to as small an area as possible.

In Figure 8 I have shown a slightly modified form of rotector wherein the pad 1' is not exactly ush with one side of the retaining strips 2 and 3 as is the case in the embodiment illustrated in Figures 1 to 7 inclusive. The pads 1 are substantially flush wit-h one side of the retaining strips, however, and it will be noted that the pad projects out further on one side of the retaining strips than it does on the other. In Figure 9 I have shown a continuous strip shields,

consisting of a series of the protecting the strip being made of adhesive tape. A portion of the adhesive 7 is shown removed so as to reveal the underlying fabric 8.

In Figure 10 I have illustrated a shield having an antiseptic powder 9 covering a portion thereof. The free end 10 of the retaining strip 3 is provided with an adhesive surface on each side thereof and this is the only adhesive on this particular protector.

Figure 11 shows a back view of the protector shownin Figure 10, showing the adhesive surface on each side of the end 10 of the retaining strip 3'. I have found that a protector such as that above described, having an adhesive surface on each side of one end thereof only is of particular value because it is very easy to apply to a finger and after it is applied, there is no exposed adhesive surface to collect dirt. One adhesive surface is applied to the skin and the other end of the strip is wrapped around the finger and pressed against the other ad- :hesive surface. The adhesive next to the skin prevents the strip from slipping while it is being applied and the other adhesive surface serves as a means for fixing the two retaining strips together. There is no exposed adhesive surface and accordingly the protector does not become soiled readily.

The antiseptic powder 9 may be applied to the protector in any suitable manner. It may be applied to an adhesive surface; such a surface holds the powder in place and the powder prevents the surface to the skin.

It is to be understood that my invention is not limited to the particular embodiments illustrated and described but includes such modifications thereof as fall within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim 1. A sanitary protector of the type described, comprising a thin flexible shielding member, and a retaining strip connected to said member near one edge thereof, the said member projecting out on one side of said strip to a considerable extent and being substantially flush with the other side thereof, whereby the projecting portion of said member is adapted to fit snugly over and conform to the contour of the palm of the hand at the base of a finger, and the retaining strip is adapted to be wrapped about the base of the finger.

2. A sanitary protector of the type described, comprising a thin flexible shielding member, a retaining strip connected to said member near one edge thereof, the said member projecting out on one side of said strip to a considerable extent and being substantially flush with the other side thereof, whereby the projecting portion of said memfrom adhering her is adapted to fit snugly over and conform to the contour of the pa in of the hand at the base of a finger, and the retaining strip is adapted to be wrapped about the base of the finger, and means independent of said stri for holding the free edge of the projectm portion of said member in place.

3. g sanitary protector of the type described, com rising a thin flexible shielding member, and a retaining strip connected to said member near one edge thereof, the said member projecting out on one side of said strip to a considerable extent and being substantially flush with the other side thereof, whereby the projecting portion of said membar is adapted to fit snugly over and conform to the contour of the palm of the hand at the base of a fin r, and the retaining strip is adapted to e wrapped about the base of the finger; the entire shielding member and retaining strip consisting of a single piece of material.

4. A sanitary protector of the type described, comprising a thin flexible shielding member having an adhesive coated surface, and an adhesive coated retaining strip connected to said member near one edge thereof, the said member projectin out on one side of said strip to a considera le extent and being substantially flush with the other side thereof, whereby the projecting portion of said member is adapted to fit snugly over and conform to the contour of a portion of the palm of the hand at the base of the finr, and the retaining strip is adapted to wrapped about the base of the finger.

5. An article of manufacture comprising a continuous strip of material, having enlarged portions at intervals along the strip forming thin flexible shielding members, separated by retaining strips which form the main portion of the strip, the said members projecting out on one side of the main portion of the strip to a. considerable extent and being substantially flush with the other side thereof, whereb the pro'ecting portion of each of said shiel ing mem ers is adapted to fit snugly over and conform-to the contour of a portion of the palm of the hand at the base of a finger, and the adjacent retaining strip is adapted to be wrapped about the base of the finger.

6. An article of manufacture comprising a continuous strip of material, having enlarged portions at intervals along the strip forming thin flexible shielding members, separated by retaining strips which form the main portion of the strip, the said members projecting out on one side of the main portion of the strip to a considerable extent and being substantially flush with the other side thereof, whereby the pro'ecting portion of each of said shielding mem rs is adapted to fit snugly over and conform to the contour of a portion of the palm of the hand at the base of a finger, an the adjacent retaining strip is adapted to be wrapped about the base of the finger; the continuous stri of material having weakened transverse ines between the enlarged portions along this strip.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature.

CLARENCE W. FULLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2437886 *Aug 11, 1943Mar 16, 1948Beatty Elmer WProtecting device for industrial gloves
US2474535 *Apr 30, 1945Jun 28, 1949Krannak Steven JProtective cot
US2732065 *Aug 17, 1953Jan 24, 1956 Dispensing roll of non-skid tape for
US3232603 *May 23, 1962Feb 1, 1966Jack A ResnickIndexing means
US3402716 *Jan 30, 1964Sep 24, 1968Surgical DevicesAdhesive strip suture
US3769071 *Jun 4, 1971Oct 30, 1973Minnesota Mining & MfgPressure sensitive adhesive tape comprising 5-fluorouracil
US3946877 *Nov 12, 1974Mar 30, 1976Virgil Rene GaliciaClip-type holder for toothbrushes or the like
US5038778 *Aug 9, 1989Aug 13, 1991Lott Mark BEndotracheal tube tape
US5172424 *Jan 25, 1991Dec 22, 1992Adkins Jean SApparatus for protection of the under finger of a quilter
US5692236 *Nov 8, 1995Dec 2, 1997Prince; SandraWriting instrument finger pad
US20080109928 *Oct 16, 2006May 15, 2008Jongchan BaeDisposable Finger Glove with Zig-Zag Slots
US20150257836 *Sep 25, 2013Sep 17, 2015Conceptomed AS a corporationShielding devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/58, 128/846, 2/21, 24/DIG.110, 346/71, 206/820
International ClassificationA61F13/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S206/82, A61F13/02, Y10S24/11
European ClassificationA61F13/02