Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1558113 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1925
Filing dateJun 14, 1922
Priority dateJun 14, 1922
Publication numberUS 1558113 A, US 1558113A, US-A-1558113, US1558113 A, US1558113A
InventorsMills Bertie E
Original AssigneeMills Novelty Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Remote control of the playing of stringed instruments
US 1558113 A
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. E. MILLS RBIOTB CONTROL OF THE PLAYING OF STRINGED INSTRUIEN'I'S Filed June 14, 1922 6 Sheets-Shoot 1 but; Efiwma,

' Oct. 20,1925.

B. E. MILLS anion CONTROL OF THE PLAYING 0F STRINGED INSTRU IENTS rmd June 14. 1922 .6 Sheets-Shoat 2 B. E. MILLS RBIOTI CONTROL OF THE PLAYING 0F STRINGED 'INSTRUIENTS Filed June 14. 1922 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Oct 20,1925. 1,558,113

B. E. MILLS REIOTB CONTROL OF THE PLAYING OF STRINGED INSTRUMENTS 6 Sheets-Shoot 4 Filed June 14. 1922 Oct. 20,1925.

B. E. MILLS REIOT! CONTROL Ql THE PLAYING OF STRINGID IIS'I'RUIII'IS Filed Jam 14 1922 1 R Patented Oct. 20, 1925.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

BEBTIE E. MILLS, O1 DETROIT, MICHIGAN, ASSIGNOR TO MILLS NOVELTY COMPANY, 01' CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS.

mom CONTROL OF THE PLAYING OF STRINGED INSTRUMENTS.

Application filed June 14, 1922.

, To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Ben-rm E. MILLS, a citizen of the United States, residing at Detroit, in the county of Wayne and State of Michigan, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Remote Control of the Playing of Stringed Instruments, of which the following is a specification.

The present invention relates to improve ments in the remote control of the playing of stringed instruments of the viol class and more particularly of such instruments played by electrically operated devices, such as are described, for example, in the patent to Henry K. Sandell, No. 855021, granted May 28, 1907.

In accordance with the present invention, the playing of one or more such stringed instrument-s is controlled by a single operator from a central control device, which may suitably be provided with a keyboard, preferably of the organ or piano type, and with means for control of the character of playing of the instruments and for the individual control of the several instruments played, where more than one is employed. The invention will be fully understood from the following description, illustrated by the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a front elevation of a suitable console or cabinet from which the instruments are controlled, the coier for the keyboard being shown in open position ot display the latter;

2 is a side elevation of the console, showing parts of the interior construction in dotted lines;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view on the line 33 of Fig. 2, showing the key-board in plan:

Fig. 4 is a sectional view on the line l.4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view showing details of the key construction;

Fig. 6 is a horizontal sectional view on the line 6-6 of Fig. 5; and

Figs. 7 and 7 together present a dia grammatic showing of the inter-connection of the several parts of the console or control cabinet with the musical instruments.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, the numeral 10 indicates a cabinet or Serial No. 568,248.

console, in which is mounted the key-board 11, which is preferably of double-bank construction and will be described in detail hereinafter. Each of the keys controls the playlng of the corresponding note upon the. violin or violins which the player has in operation at the moment. Ina convenient location, preferably just above the key-board, are arranged a number of switches, of which two. designated as 12 and 13, control the mute operating devices and the bow or sounder rosining devices, respectively. The remaining switches, designated as 11, 15 and 16 control individual violins. In the cabinet shown, provision is made for the playing of three violins; it is readiy apparent that any number of violins may be controlled in similar manner from the same cabinet.

A plurality of pedal control devices, designated as 17, 1S and 19, are likewise provided in convenient position for operation as in musical instruments generally of the console type. As illustrated in the present drawings, pedal 17 may be designated as the soft pedal, pedal 18 as the loud pedal and pedal 19 as the crescendo pedal. The soft pedal 17, and the loud pedal 18 affect all of the instruments in operation. The pedal 19, in the embodiment illustrated, is employed to give crescendo and decrescendo effects by increasing and decreasing the numbers of instruments in operation. The operation of these control devices will be fully set forth hereinafter.

In Figures 5 and 6 the mechanical details of construction and operation of the individual keys are illustrated. Each of the keys 20 is mounted upon a head 21 at the forward end of a key lever 22. This lever is provided with a fulcrum notch 23 resting upon the upturned edge of an angle bar 2J1. extending across the console. This angle bar serves as a fulcrum bar for an entire bank of keys. Approximately above the notch 23 the lever is formed with an overhanging projection extending rearwardly of the notch. From this projection a coil spring 26 extends downwardly to and is secured at its end to the bar 2+1 and this spring aids in holding the keys 21) in normal inoperative position. The rear portion of the lever 22' extends obliquely downwardly and to its end 27 are secured, by suitable insulated mounting 28 and 29, the metallic contact members 30 and 31. An angle bar 32 is mounted to extend across the console and to it are secured a plurality of contact jacks 33, one of which corresponds to the contact member 30 of each of the keylevers 22. These contact jacks consist of spring contact members 31 and spaced apart by a suitable insulating material 36. The contact jacks 33 are so secured to the angle bar 32 that there is direct metallic contact between the spring contact member 31 and the angle bar, so that the angle bar 32 serves as a common electrical conductor for all of the contact jacks 33. A metallic bar 37, se arated from the jacks 33 by suitable insu ating material 38, likewise extends across the console and to it are secured the contact jacks 39, each of which corresponds to the contact member 31 of one of the key-levers. One of the contact members of each of the contact jacks 39 is in direct metallic contact with the bar 37, so that the latter serves as a common electrical connection for these contact jacks. In the form illustrated in Fig. 5, the contacts 30 and 31 and the contact jacks 33 and 39 are so disposed that the contact members close the circuits through the contact jacks. At the same time that these contacts are closed by depression of the key. a projecting head 40 on the key-lever engages a cushioning member of felt or the like indicated by numeral 41, secured to the angle bar 32. lVhen the key is depressed, its return movement is effected by the spring 26. as is readily apparent. Cushioned stops are provided to soften the return movement of the key-levers, these being conveniently formed as bars 42 extending across the console and above each bank of key-levers and provided on their under sides with cushions 43 of suitable material, such as felt. It is apparent that depression of akey results in the closure of two circuits, one through the jacks 33 and the other through the jacks 39. One of these circuits may, for exam le, control the mechanism upon the stringe instrument in operation for sounding the particular note corresponding to the key struck and the other contact may, for example, control a tremolo device. According to the length and position of the contact members 30 and 3 1, the note and the tremolo circuit may be simultaneously closed or the note circuit may be closed by a partial depression of the key and the tremolo circuit by its further depression.

The mechanical operation and construction of the pedals are shown in Fig. 4. These levers extend inwardly into the cabinet 10 and are mounted upon suitable pivot fulcrums 44, 45 and 46, respectively. At its innor end pedal 17 is provided with a contact point 47 in a suitable insulated mounting 48. On depression of the pedal 17 the contact point 47 engages successively two contact points 49 and 50 mounted upon a vertical standard 51 of insulating material;-

similar contact point 52 is provided on the inner end of the pedal lever 18 and this, in turn, makes contact with the contact ints 53 and 54 mounted on standard 51, in t e proper posit-ions of pedal 18. The crescendo pedal 19 is 75 provided at its inner end with a series of insulated contact points 55, 56 and 57 which 00- operate with the arcuate contact plates 58, 59 and 60 on a standard 61 of insulating material.

The contact plates 58, 59 and 60 are so disa? posed that, as the pedal 19 is moved downwardly, they are successively engaged by the corresponding contact points on the pedal 1ever at difi'erent points in the travel of the pedal. After the several contact points 55. 56 and 57 engage the corresponding contact plates, they remain in contact during the continued travel of the pedal lever.

The operation of t 1c 'iolins from the console, the mechanical construction of which has been described, will appear from the diagram presented in Figs. 7 and 7, the former showing the left half of the diagram 1 and the latter the right half. In Fig. 7 the i operating mechanism in the console is shown ent No. 1,407,434 of February 21, 1922. The detailed circuits are shtiwn in connection. o with a single violin and it will be readily apparent that any number of violins niay 3.: be used, as desire i In considering the circuits, it will be noted that one line, indicated as the nega' tive line in Figures 7 and 7', is common to all the circuits and this line has been designated by the numeral 62. A main switch 63, which may be placed at any suitable .Q point on the console, controls the circuits through the entire device. The positive main is indicated by the numeral 64. From;

a branch 65 of this line are taken of three! lines 66, 67 and 68, which control the op- I eration of the first, second, and third violins, respectively. These lines are con tinued in the diagram through Fig. 7. It

will be noted, on consideration of the latter figure that the line 66 leads'to the contact 5 closing solenoid 69 of the first violin, the

circuit being completed through the line 70 to the line 71 which in turn connects directly with the return of negative main 62.

The current through the solenoid 69 energizes the latter, which closes two sets of contacts, one of which closes the tremolo circuit and the other the bow-motor circuit, as will be more fully described hereinafter.

From the incoming or positive main 61 a line 72 leads to the control panel 73 for the bow-motor 7-t.- The arrangement of connections in the control panel for governing the speed of rotation of the bow-1notor may be substantially that dewribed in the patentof Henry K, Sandell, No. 1,085,913 of February 3, 1914. The point of connection of the line 72 to the control panel, corresponds to a? of that patent, and is so designated in Fig. 7. From a? the circuit passes to a through a suitable resistance r, as shown in the Sandell )atent just referred to, and from a through line 75 to line 7 (5 leading to the contact 77. The switch member 78 secured to solenoid core 70 closes the circuit between contact 77 and contact 80. From contact 80 a line 81 leads to one terminal of the motor 74. From the other terminal of the motor, line 82 leads to contact 83 on the panel 73. Contact 83 is connected through a resistance r to contact 81, from which av line 85 leads to the line 70 connecting with the negative line 71. As long as the switch 11 is closed, the abovedescribed bow-motor circuit, which is the circuit for normal speed of rotation, is closed. Switch 15 controls in a similar way the normal bow-motor circuit of a second violin and switch 16 of a third violin. All ditional switches may be provided if additional violins are to be played.

The ciescendo pedal 19 provides a set of switches controlling the bowmotor circuits of the different violins, these switches being in parallel with the switches 11, 15 and 10. The contact plates 58, 59 and 60 are connected by lines 86, 87 and 88, respectively, through the first, second and third violin control lines 66, 67 and 68. The contact points 55, 56 and 57 on the pedal 19 are directly connected by line 89 to the incoming or positive main 64. As the pedal 19 is pushed down, contact 55 engages plate thereby causing a. current to pass through line 66 and actuating the bow-motor of the first violin. As the pedal lever continues its movement, contact 57 engages plate 50, thereby bringing the second violin into action; further movement of the pedal lever causes the contact point 57 to engage the plate 60, thereby bringing the third violin into action. The arcnate shape of the several contact plates causes the respective violins may be brought in and cut out for ceeding one is closed by the movement of the pedal. As a result, for example, if the first violin is playing the melody, by movement of the pedal 10, the second and third violins may be brought in and out for crescendo and decrescendo el'l'ects, as desired, without operating the switches 15 and 16.

The notes played upon the violin in ac tion are controlled by means of the keys 20, of which four are illustrated in the diagrammatic Figure 7. These are designated in that figure as 20 20 20 and 20, and operate respectively notes on the G, D, it and E strings of the violin. As the circuits controlled by the several keys are in many respects similar, similar elements in connection therewith will be designated by the same reference numerals, and with suffixes indicating the strings afiected. The circuit controlled by the key 20 will be described in detail.

As has been described in connection with the mechanical construction of the key levers, the key 20 is mounted upon key lever 22, which bears two insulated contact members 30 and 31 The former controls the note circuitand the latter the tremolo circuit.

The contact member 30 closes the circuit through jack 83, which is connected on the one hand to the line 91 which is a branch from the positive or incoming main. On the other hand, the ack 33 is connected to the note control line 92 which is provided with a connection to each of the lines corresponding to the particular note. Referring to Figure 7, it will be seen that the line 92 is connected to line to the lingering magnet 01 from which a connection 95 leads to the bow-depressing magnet 96 and from this in turn a connection 97 leads to the negative or return line (32. Energization of the magnet 91 actuates the lingering lever 98 and simultaneously the energization of the magnet 96 causes the operation of the lever 99 to depress the constantly rotating sounder shaft 100 operated by the bow-motor. A similar circuit is provided for each of the notes capable of being sounded on each of the strings. It will likewise be apparent that each of the keys controls the same notes on all of the violins in operation at any time.

The contacts 31 control the tremolo circuit. Each of the acks 36, with which these contacts co-operate, is connected, on the one hand, through a line 101 to the positive or incoming line 05 and, on the other hand, to the tremolo control line 102. The tremolo control line 102 is provided with a branch 103 for each violin, and this branch connection terminates at a. contact 101. A switch member 105, operated by the solenoid G0 which effects the closing of the circuit through the bow-motor of the corresponding violin, closes the circuit between the contact 101 and the contact 106. From the latter contact a con cction 107 leads to the contact spring 108 which engages the ii brating electromagnet armature 109, the circuit being completed through the electromagnets and the line 111 leading to the line 70 which connects with the negative line 71. The vibrating armature 109 causes lateral movement of the string su port- 112, thereby producing the tremolo e ect. It is readily apparent that each key is provided with means for closing the tremolo circuit through the violins in operation.

The pedals 17 and 18 control the expression of the violins in operation by varying the speed of the bow-motor. The pedal lever 18, which is connected to the positive line 64, when partly depressed closes the circuit through the contacts 52 and 53 and line 113, from which a branch 113 leads to the terminal a on each bow-motor control panel 73. From the terminal a connection is made to the terminal a through a resistance 1" lower than the resistance r between the terminal a and the terminal a. The circuit passes on through the bow-motor control a and the bow-motor in the manner described above in connection with the bowmotor circuit. As the resistance in the bowmotor circuit is lowered by closing this circuit, a louder tone of the bows or sounders is reduced.

somplete depression of the pedal 18 closes the circuit through the contacts 52 and 54:, resulting in the passage of a current through the connector 114. From this connector 114 connects directly with the bow-motor circuit connection 76, thereby cutting out additional resistance, further increasing the speed of the motor and producing the loudest tone.

Partial depression of the soft pedal 17 closes the circuit from the positive line through the contacts 47 and 49 and the line 115, from which a connection 115 passes to each control panel 73. The connections in the control panel are so arranged (in a known manner) that the closure of this circuit introduces a resistance in shunt across the bow-motor circuit, thereby weakening the current passing through the bowmotor and softening the tones produced.

Full depression of the soft pedal 17 closes the "circuit from the positive line through the contact 47 and 50 and the connector 116, from which a branch connection 116 passes to a terminal a in each control panel 7 3. The control panel is so arranged that closure of this circuit throws in shunt across the bow-motor circuit (in a known manner) a resistance lower than that introduced by closure of the circuit through the line 115, with a result that a still softer tone is produced.

Additional circuits are provided for applying the mute to the violins and for applying rosin to the bows or sounders. The control switch 12. which actuates the mute. closes a circuit from the line 65 through line 117, from which a branch 117' passes to 9 the mute magnet 118 of each violin. From the mute magnet the circuit is closed throng: the line 119 and the line 71 leading to t negative main 62. The mute magnet 118 7. operates a bent armature 121 to app y lateral a pressure to the bridge 122 of each violin. Y 4

The rosin switch 13 closes the circuit from the positive line 65 through the line 123,. from which a branch line 123' makes connection with a suitable elect ct 124:, f the circuit being completed throgglh line 1191 p leading to the negative main.. emagnet 124, when energized, operates a bent armav ture 125 to depress a rosin-holding device I 126 and engage it with the sounders 127. v As is wel known, in playing theup apositions on the G, D and A strings o a violin, the notes formed are the same, or overlap those of the first position on the next higher strings. In order to indicate the upper positions on the strings. clearly to the operator at the console and to prevent any accidental attempt to operate the next mechanism for pla ing two notes on the same string, a key-board is provided in which two banks of keys are provided. The up, per bank is indicated on the drawing by t e numeral 126 and the lower by the numeral 127. The lower bank of keys controls the lower position notes for each of the four strings and these keys are followed on the lower bank by the upper position E string: notes, so that with respect to G, D and A. strings, the lower bank of keys can be 0 erated to lay the lower position notes on 7 while, wit respect to the E string, he s are provided in the lower bank for bot :the lower and upper position notes. The .up-

l per bank of keys may, as illustrated, carry 1; r a duplicate set of the lower position G string. 1 r t notes; aside from these, it carries only upper 1,5, 7 position notes. Keys of the upper bank are located above the keys corresponding toridentical notes on the lower bank. ZThus. note 128 in Fig. 3 is note Fin an upper poa sition on the G string and note "129 is the same F in the lower position on the'D string-T Either the upper or lowerbank-Iof keys? forms a complete key-board la'nd by using both key-boards, all four'strings oi the in struments may be played upon at once. a.

It may be stated further with referenoe to the manuals, or banks oi keys, that the: manuals have keys arranged in associated v groups, with a certain group of one'manu'al controlling the lower position notes" of one string and an associated group of the other manual controlling the corresponding upper position notes of a lower string. Thus for example, the keys D of the lower manna correspond with the lower position notes of! the D string, while the keys G of the asso ciated group which is just above in the up a per manual correspond with the same upper position notes of the G string. Besides this, the manuals are completed by employing duplicate groups of keys. Thus the group of G keys in the lower manual corresponds exactly with the group of G-keys immediately above in the upper manual. So, also, at the right hand ends of the manuals. the I) keys of the lower manual correspond with the E keys of the upper manual.

It should be kept in mind that in the embodiment illustrated, the actuation of any manual-key, causes the energization of the finger-actuating magnet and of the ho wdepressing or bow-applying magnet, of each instrument, regardless of whether or not the bows are being driven (revolved). Otherwise stated. when any key is depressed. the lingering is performed for the selected note with reference to all instruments and the bows are depressed for all instruments. but the sounding of the selected note on any instrument occurs only if the bow is being driven (revolved). Thus, the selecting of the instruments is effected by closing the bow-motor circuits by means of the switches 14, 15 and 16 on the console.

I claim:

1. In a device for the remote control of the playing of musical instruments, means for sounding the indiyidual notes for each of a plurality of stringed instruments of the viol class, a key-board provided with keys corresponding to the notes of said instru ments. means actuated by each of said keys for actuating the corresponding note-sounding means of said instruments, and means for selecting the individual instruments upon which the notes are to be sounded.

2. In a device for the remote control of the playing of musical instruments, means for sounding the individual notes of each of a plurality of stringed instruments of the viol class, a key-board provided with keys corresponding to the notes of said instruments, means actuated by each of said keys for actuating the corresponding notesounding means of said instruments, means for selecting the individual instruments upon which the notes are to be sounded. and independently operable means for controlling, the operation of others of said in.- strumen'ts.

3. In a device for the remote control of the playing of musical instruments, means for sounding the individual notes of each of a plurality of stringed instruments of the viol class, a key-board provided with keys corresponding to the notes of said instruments, means actuated by each of said keys for actuating the corresponding note-sounding means of said instruments, a tremolo device in combination with each of said instruments, and means actuated by each of the keys for actuating the tremolo devices of the instruments in operation.

l. in a device for the remote control of the playing oi? musical instruments, means i'or sounding the individual notes of each of a plurality of stringed instruments of the viol class, a tren'iolo device in combination with each of said instrul'nents, a key-board provided with keys corresponding to the notes of said instruments, means actuated by cach oi said keys tor actuating the corresponding note-sounding means of said instruments and for actuating said tremolo dc'vices.-. and means for selecting the individual instruments. the note-sounding means and tremolo devices of which are to be actuated.

In a device for the remote control of the playing oi musical instruments, means for sounding the individual notes of a stringed instrument of the viol class, a tremolo device operatively connected with said instrument, a keyboard provided with keys corresponding to the notes 01 the in strument, means actuated by each of said keys for actuating the corresponding notesounding means of the instrument, and means actuated by each of said keys tor actuating said tremolo device.

6. In a device for the remote control oi the playing of musical instruments, means for sounding the individual notes of a stringed instrument of the viol class, said means in cluding an open electrical circuit, a tremolo device operatively connected with said instrument, a normally open electrical circuit for the control of said tremolo device, a keyboard provided with keys corresponding to the notes of said instrument, contact members on each of said keys arranged to close the circuit of the corresponding note-sounding means when the key is depressed, and contact means on each of said keys for closing the circuit through the tremolo device when any of said keys depressed.

T. In a device For the remote control of the playing of musical instruments, means for sounding the individual notes of each of a plurality of stringed instruments of the viol class, said means including a single open electrical circuit for each note of all said in struments, a key-board provided with keys corres 'ionding to the notes of said instruments, and contact members on each side of said keys for closing the electrical circuit of the corresponding note-sounding means when the key is depressed.

S. In a device for the remote control of the playing of musical instruments, means for sounding the individual notes of each of a plurality of stringed instruments of the viol class. said means including a single open electrical circuit corresponding to the sounding means for each note of all said instruments, tremolo devices "for each of said instruments, an open electrical circuit for operating said tremolo devices, a keyboard llO . provided with keys corresponding to the notes of the instruments, contacts on each of said keys for closing the circuit of the corresponding note-sounding means of the instruments, and contact means on each of said keys for closing the electrical circuit for operating the tremolo devices.

9. In a device for the remote control of the playing of musical instruments, means for sounding the individual notes of a plurality of stringed instruments of the viol class, said means including an electrical circuit for the control of the operation of each instrument and a circuit for the control of each note of all the instruments, and a centrally located control device including independently controllable circuit closing devices for each of said electrical-circuits.

10. In a device for the remote control of the playing of musical instruments, means for sounding the individual notes of each of a plurality of stringed instruments of the viol class, said means including an electrical circuit for the control of the operation of each instrument and a circuit for the control of each note of all the instruments, a tremolo device co-operating with each instrument, a circuit for the control of the tremolo devices, and centrally located controls including circuit closing devices for the circuits controlling the operation of the instruments, independently controllable circuit closing devices for closing the circuits controlling the notes of the instruments, and circuit closing devices co-operating with the last-mentioned circuit closing devices for closing the circuits controlling the tremolo devices.

11. In a device for the remote control of the playing of musical instruments, means for sounding the individual notes of a plurality of stringed instruments of the viol class, said means including rotating sounders for sounding the strings of the instruments, an electrical circuit for the control of the operation of each instrument and a circuit for the control of each note of all the instruments, means for applying rosin to said sounders, an electrical circuit for controlling the rosin-applying devices of all said instruments, and a centrally lo- ,cated control device including independently controllable circuit closing devices for each of said electrical circuits.

12. In a device for the remote control of ,the playing of musical instruments, means for sounding the individual notes of a plurality of stringed instruments of the viol class, said means including an electrical circuit for the control of the operation of each instrument and a circuit for the control of each note of all theinstruments, means for fmuting each of the instruments, an electri cal circuit for controlling all said muting means, and a centrally located control device including independently controllable circuit closing devices for each of said elec- I trical circuits. w 13. In a device for the remote control of; I the playing of musical instruments, mom is, for sounding the individual notes of a pl'urality of stringed instruments of the vial, f class, said means including an electrical cit p cuit for the control of the operation of each instrument and a circuit for the control of is, each note of all the instruments. means for, j controlling the volume of sound produced f by said instruments, said means including an electrical circuit controlling each gradetion of volumevarying from normal, end-a, I centrally located control device including in dependently controllable circuit closing as vices for each of said electrical circuits. a

14. In a device of the character set forth, a ;;,v the combination of a console, mechanisms 8 for driving the Sounders of a lurality of stringed instruments of the viofclass, else trical circuits controlling said driving mechanisms each including a controlling switch mounted on the console, whereby any as selected driving mechanism may be thrown into use at the will of the operator, soundercontrolling magnets, and a key-board previded with keys corresponding with said magnets, each key controlling the eircuitevp 1 of the magnets of the several instruments F1 for the same string of each instrument. h 15. In a device of the character set forth, a the combination of a console, for driving the sounders of a plurality-leg! j stri ed instruments of the vio class, elee trica circuits controlling said drivin mechanisms each including a controlling 7 switch mounted on the console, wherebyany selected driving mechanism may be thrown-dips;- into use at the will of the operator, sounder-controlling magnets, finger-contr magnets, and a key-board provided wit keys, each .key controlling correspon sounder-eontro ling magnets of the sever instruments and each ey also controlling corresponding fingeracontrolling magnets} of the several instruments:

16. In a device for the remote control M the playing of musical instruments, means for sounding the individual notesofim stringed instrument of the viol 61938 -81 means, includinfimelectfical circuits, cornsponding with t notes, a key-board vided with keys corresponding with notes of the instrument, and a contaetidfle vice carried by each oi keys and trolling the circuit attire means corresponding with. said they, 1 T soundem-drivin'g meaneihlving an, electlt' contro circuit provided with a switch which is independent of said keysm 1 17. In a device for the remote on y the playing of musical instruments, combination with soundetrcontrolling mags" v. '7 h E F I h I l k a a i ms new mil-Jim! assi ns: Asa! nets and finger-controlling magnets and suitable circuits thereior, of a key-manual provided with keys corresponding; with the notes to be sounded, and circuit-controlling contacts for said circuits controlled by said keys.

18. In a device for the remote control of the playing of musical instruments, the combination with the sounder-controlling mag nets and finger-controlling magnets of a stringed instrument of the viol class, and suitable circuits for said magnets, ot' a plurality of key-manuals, each provided with an orderly arrangement of keys, and circuit-controlling contacts controlled by said keys, said manuals having keys arranged in associated groups, with a certain group of one manual controlling the lower position notes of one string and an associated group of another manual controlling the corresponding upper position notes of a lower string.

10. In a device for the remote control of the playing of musical instruments. the combination with the sountier-controlling magnets and finger-controlling magnets of a stringed instrument of the viol class. and suitable circuits for said magnets, of a plurality of key-manuals, each provided with an orderly arrangement of keys, circuit-controlling contacts cont-rolled by said keys, said manuals having keys arranged in associated groups, with a certain group of one manual controlling the lower position notes of one string and an associated group of another manual controlling the corresponding upper position notes of a lower string, and groups in each manual duplicating like groups in the other manual and thus making a complete register in each manual.

20. In a device for the remote control of the playing of stringed instruments of the viol class, a manual having its keys arranged in separate groups, each group controlling the sounding ot' a given string for the production of notes on said string, and lingering means for each of the several strings of said instrument controlled by said keys.

21. In a device for the remote control ot the playing of a stringed instrument oi the viol class. a manual having its keys arranged in separate groups, each group controlling the sounding of a given string for the production oi a plurality of notes on said string and the several groups being arranged in succession to correspond with the playing of the strings in G, D, A, E order, and tingering means for each of the several strings of said instrument controlled by said keys.

In a device for the remote control of the playing of a plurality of stringed instruments ot' the viol class, a key-board pro vided with an upper key-manual and a lower key-manual, said manuals having keys arranged in associated groups, the lower manual having groups of keys corresponding with all of the lower position notes of all the strings and the upper manual having groups of keys corresponding with all the upper position notes of all the strings, and note-sounding means for each of the several strings of said instrument controlled by said keys.

23. In means ot the character set forth, the combination of a plurality of sounderdriving mechanisms for a plurality of stringed instruments of the viol class, and electrical circuits controlling the operation of said mechanisms, a plurality of switches controlling said circuits, said switches being operable at the will 01' the operator as a means for selecting the instruments to be played, fretting devices and sounder-applying devices and controlling circuits therefor for each of the several instruments, and a key-board provided with keys equipped with means controlling said last-named circuits.

BERTIE E. MILLS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4156380 *Aug 3, 1976May 29, 1979Fulton Truxton KMusical instruments
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/326, 984/210
International ClassificationG10F1/18, G10F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationG10F1/18
European ClassificationG10F1/18