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Publication numberUS1559277 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 27, 1925
Filing dateApr 20, 1923
Priority dateApr 20, 1923
Publication numberUS 1559277 A, US 1559277A, US-A-1559277, US1559277 A, US1559277A
InventorsNelson John H
Original AssigneeNelson John H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wheel-supporting fork for bicycles and the like
US 1559277 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 27, 1925.

J. H. NELSON WHEEL SUPPORTING FORK FOR BICYCLES AND THE LIKE Filed April 20 1923 John jimzsak. 3% W fad Patented Oct. 27, 1925.

' UNITED STATES 1,559,277 PATENT OFFICE.

JOHN H. NELSON, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

' WHEEL-SUPPORTING FORK FOR BICYCLES AND THE LIKE. I l f To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, JOHN 'I-I. NELsoN a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in th county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented a certain new and useful Wheel-Supporting Fork for Bicycles and the like, of which the following is a specification.

The invention pertains to bicycles and like vehicles, and has especial reference to an improved construction for the steering wheel fork. r

The object of the invention is to provide a fork of a thoroughly practical character, which possesses great strength and rigidity; which may be manufactured at a low cost; and which presents a neat and ornamental appearance.

In the accompanying drawings Ihave illustrated a fork construction embodying my invention in its preferred form. I wish to point out, however, that it is contemplated that various changes in the construction and arrangement of the parts may be made by those skilled in the art, without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

Figure 1 of the drawings is a side elevational view of my improved fork. Fig. 2 is a front view of the same. Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken in the plane of line 3-3 of Fig. 1 but on an enlarged scale. Figs. 4, 5 and 6 are elevational views of several of the parts in detached relation. Fig. 7 is a fragmentary front elevational view partly in section illustrating details of construction. Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially in the plane of line 8-8 of Fig. 7'.

The fork comprises generally a bifurcated lower portion 10 adapted to straddle the wheel ,to be mounted thereon, such as the steering wheel of'the bicycle, and a shank 11 which is adapted to be supported in the bicycle frame and to which the handle bars are secured in the usual way.

I preferably construct the bifurcated por tion 10 from solid rod stock, bent to form front, rear and intermediate members 12, 13 and 14. The front and rear members 12 and 13 are of U-shape and preferably are made from a single piece of stock by bending it first substantially midway between its ends (see Fig. 5) to form one of the members 12, 13, and then doubling the arms of the U-shape structure thus formed back the upper inwardly extending Application filed April 20, 1923. Serial No. 633,417. 3 I

upon themselves substantially, midway between their ends and bringing them together at. their free ends to form the other one of said members 12, 13., In the construction herein shown the rear member 13 is first formed, and the forward member 12 is completed by connecting the free ends. of the rod as shown in broken lines'at 16, Fig. 2.

In the present instance I employ two intermediate members 14 made from separate piecesof rod stock but secured at their up- I per ends to the head 19iso asv to .be in effect integrally connected therebyto form a-single U-member when the parts are welded together as hereinafter set forth. These'separate pieces are shapedv at their lower ends as shown at 17 6) so as to enter snugly between the arms of the front and rear members 12 and 13. At their upperends they are curved inwardly as at 18 (Fig'. 7) for a purpose which will presently appear.

In fastening the parts of the bifurcated portion 10 to the lower end of the shank 11 I employ at the lowerend of the shank a tubular head 19 adapted to receive snugly the lower end of the shank. In the front and rear sides of this head near the lower end thereof I provide recesses in the form of transverse grooves 20 adapted to receive the upper ends of the front and rear members 12 and 13: and upon oppos te sides of the head I provide recesses or apertures 21 to receive ends of the intermediate members 14.

The parts of the lower bifurcated portion 10 are secured together at their lower ends by welding. and the upper ends of such parts are secured to the head and the latter secured to the shank also by welding. In thev first welding operation. the .lower ends of the oppositeside arms of the members 12 and 13, with'the member's Mentered therebetween, areplaced in. .a suitable die of a press which is equipped so as to perform the welding operation while-simultaneously exerting pressure upon the parts. Thus the lower ends of the fork are shaped and welded in. a single operation to form in effect integral toe portions as shown in'Figs. 1 and 3, which is finally drilled near the lower free ends of the opposite side portions to pro vide apertures 22 for the wheel journal. Y

This shaping operation may include the curving of the lower ends of the fork as shown in Fig. 1, where this is desired.

In the next operation, the members 12 and 13am entered in their grooves 20 :in the head l9, and the upper ends of the inter mediate members 14 are entered in the apertures 21 provided therefor. Then with the shank 11 entered into the head, the parts are placed in a suitable die :in the press and in one operation rigidly welded together. In this operation also the free ends of the rod from Which the front and rear members of the lower bifurcated portion 10 are formed are secured together.

It will be observed from Figs. 2 and 7 that the intermediate members 14 of the fork are so proportioned as to extend outwardly and upwardly beyond the sides of the front and rear members '12 and 13, so as to produce an effect of symmetry.

It will be seen that in making my improved fork I employ materials of relatively low cost, and form and assemble the parts with a minimum labor expenditure. It will also be observed 'that I have produced a fork of a very rugged character, capable of withstanding extreme-strains and not subject to 'breal'ra ge when the strain is too great, as is the case with the common tubular con struction employed. At the same time the fork presents an appearance pleasing to the eye, lending itself readily to preferred ornamentat-ion.

I claim as my invention:

1. A wheel carrying fork comprising a shank, and a bifurcated lower portion having U-shaped members disposed one in front of the-other with their corresponding lower ends integral and their upper ends bowed and rigidly secured upon opposite sides of said shank.

2. A wheel supporting fork comprising a shank, a head rigidly secured to the lower end of the shank and a lower bifurcated portion having integral front and rear U -shaped members, the upper ends of said members being bowed and rigidly secured to the head in spaced relation.

3. A wheel supporting fork comprising a head meinber and a bifurcated portion comprising integral U-shaped members disposed one in front'of the other, and having bowed upper ends said head having recesses in which the bowed ends of the front and rear members are entered and rigidly secured.

t. A wheel-supporting fork comprising a head, and a bifurcated portion comprising front, rear and intermediate members rigidly secured together at their lower ends and having their upper portions rigidly secured to said head, the front and rear members being U-ShZlJPGCl with bowed upper end portions.

'5. A wheel-s11pporting fork comprising a head, and a bifurcated portion comprising front, rear and intermediate members rigidly secured together at their lower ends and having their upper portions 'rigidly secured to said head, certain of said members being so proportioned as to extend upwardly and outwardly beyond the adjacent members.

6. A wheel-supporting fork comprising, in combination, a head and a bifurcated portion comprising front and rear side members at each side of said head integrally connected at their lower ends and rigidly secured at their upper ends "upon the front and rear'sides of said head, and a reinforcing means comprising intermediate 'members secured at their lower ends between the front and rear members and at their upper ends to said head substantially midway between the front and rear members, said head having apertures to receive the upper ends of said intermediate members.

7. A Wheel supporting fork consisting of a single piece of solid rod stock bent to form two U-shaped members disposed one in front of the other with the lower ends of the two members integrally connected at corresponding sides, the upper end portions of the "two members being bowed, and ahead on the opposite sides of which said bowed ends of the members are rigidly secured.

8. A wheel supporting fork consisting of a single piece of solid rod stock bent to form two U-shaped members disposed one in front of the other with the lower ends of the two members integrally connected at corresponding sides, the upper end portions of the two members being bowed, and a head on the opposite sides of which said bowed ends of the members are rigidly secured, said head having recesses adapted to receive the bowed upper ends of the two members.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto affixed my signature.

' JOHN H. NELSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5183281 *Mar 15, 1991Feb 2, 1993Stephens David MBicycle frame element protector
US7017930May 5, 2004Mar 28, 2006Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Bicycle fork with tensioned damping member
US7125030May 5, 2004Oct 24, 2006Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Seatpost with vibration isolation member
US7144028Oct 23, 2003Dec 5, 2006Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Bicycle front fork assembly
US7147237 *Feb 14, 2003Dec 12, 2006Morgan NicolBicycle fork
US7380808Dec 3, 2004Jun 3, 2008Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Bicycle wheel support with vibration isolation
US7398986Feb 13, 2007Jul 15, 2008Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Bicycle front fork assembly
US8454044Jan 31, 2011Jun 4, 2013Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Bicycle damping system
US8540267Mar 23, 2012Sep 24, 2013Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Bicycle damping system
US8678416May 31, 2013Mar 25, 2014Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Bicycle damping system
CN100554076CFeb 14, 2003Oct 28, 2009雷斯解决方案有限公司Bicycle fork for guiding vehicle wheel
EP1840021A2 *Jun 17, 2003Oct 3, 2007Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Bicycle front fork assembly
WO2004007271A1 *Jun 17, 2003Jan 22, 2004Specialized Bicycle ComponentsBicycle front fork assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/279
International ClassificationB62K21/02, B62K21/00
Cooperative ClassificationB62K21/02
European ClassificationB62K21/02