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Publication numberUS1559461 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 27, 1925
Filing dateMay 28, 1921
Priority dateMay 28, 1921
Publication numberUS 1559461 A, US 1559461A, US-A-1559461, US1559461 A, US1559461A
InventorsSamuel Ruben
Original AssigneeSamuel Ruben
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas and vapor indicating device
US 1559461 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 27, 1925.

S. RUBI-2N` GAS AND VAPOR INDICATING DEVICE Filed May 28, 1921 @www l@ gnou/1 lo@ c 7 ,Wwe/L gwbw.

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Patented Oct. 27, 1925.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

SAMUEL RUBEN, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

GAS AND VAPOR INDICATING DEVICE.

Application led Hay 2B,

T o all whom 'it may concern.'

Be it known that I, SAMUEL RUBEN, a citizen of the United States, residing at New York, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Gas and Vapor Indicatin Devices, of which the following is a speci cation.

This invention relates to means for detectin the present and indicating the density o gases and vapors. In one form of the invention, I arrange in'an electric circuit, having a source of constant potential, an adsorption material which is also electrically conductive, together with a device for indicating the value of the current flowing through the circuit, or a relay for controlling a circuit containing an audible signaling device. Tlie conductivity of this adsor tion material in a dry state, and out o the presence of gases or vapors, is constant, but varies largely in the presence of gases and vapors according to the density of the occluded gas or vapor and the time of exposure of the material to the gas or vapor. Hence, when brought into the presence of the gas or va or, the resistance of the electric circuit wi l ch nge and the current flowing through the circuit will also chang and the meter or relafy will be actuated to indicate the presence o the gas or vapor.

In another form of the invention, the adsorption material is employed as a heating element for a thermo-couple in a circuit containing a visual indicating device or a relay controlling an audible signalling device, The adsor tion material is applied to the junction o? the dis-similar elements of the thermo-couple, and becomes heated by the adsorption'of the gases or vapors, and this heat, transferred to the thermo-couple causes the neration of a current which traverses the circuit and actuates the signalling device.

In the accompanying drawing,

Figi 1 represents a gas or vapor detecting apparatus embodying my invention in its preferred form, the electric circuit being shown diagrammatically and including a meter as an indicator;

Fig. 2 shows in longitudinal central section the same apparatus, the electric circuit including a relay which operates an audible signal device contained in a local circuit; and,

Fig. 3 is a modification in which the adsorptxon material serves as a heating me- 1921. Serial N0. 473,460.

dium for a thermo-couple which is connected in circuit with the meter or indicating device.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawing, a represents a body of insulating material in the form of a spool having flanges a. and caps a2 fitting on the flanges. The body of the spool between the flanges has a coating of absorption material b, such as palladium black, platinum sponge, or finely divided conductive material. Metal bands 1 are clamped about the spool and the coating and ma e electrical connection with theI coating. These bands are provided with suitable terminals 2&3, which are connected by conductors 4 and 5, respectively, to a battery 6. In Fig. 1, a m1llivoltmeter 7 is connected in the conductor 4, to indicate the current flowin in the circuit. In Fig. 2, a relay 8 is connected in the conductor 4, and this rela controls the local circuit 9 in which is inc uded an electrically operated bell or buzzer 10.

When no gas is present, a constant current will flow in the circuit 4 5, and the millivoltmeter 7, in Fig. 1, will be adjusted `to give no indication; but in the presence of a gas, the gas will be adsorbed by the coating of material on the insulator. This will change the resistance of the material which is in the electric circuit, and the volume of current flowing in the circuit will vary accordingly and be indicated on the millivoltmeter. The readings on the meter will indicate the density of the gas or vapor, and also, to some extent, its nature, ksince some gases and vapors will increase the resistance of the adsorption material while other gases and va ors will decrease its resistance.

In Fig. 2. these variations of current from normal will actuate the relay and the latter will cause the bell or buzzer to give an audible signal.

In order to dry the coating in case it becomes wet or moist, a heating coil h is provided within the insulator. This coil is connected to binding posts 11 and 12 on the ca s a2 and connected with an electric circult 13-14, in which is included a switch 15, which may be closed to cause the current to flow through the coil and heat the spool and coating and drive the moisture out of the coating. The adsorbed gases will gradually leave the coating and be replaced by air, when the apparatus is out of the presheat; but by heating the coatmg the gases will be driven out more quickly. This heating may be effected by passing a current through the heating coil, or by applying heat in any other Way.

In Fig. 3, I have shown an arrangement wherein the adsorptionI material is applied to the thermo-cou le as a heatin element, and does not itsel form a part o the electric circuit. Referrin to F 1g. 3, c indicates a thermo-couple to w ich is applied at the joint between its elements, a coating b of adsorption material. The thermo-couple is connected in an electric circuit ltr-17, which includes a milli-voltmeter 18. In the presence of gases or vapors the material b adsorbs the gases and thus causes heat at the joint in the thermo-couple and the generation of an electric current which flows through the circuit and is indicated on the milli-voltmeter.

What I claim is:

1. A gas detecting apparatus comprising an insulating body, a coating of adsorption material thereon, an electric circuit including said material, and an indicator controlled by the current flow in said circuit.

2. A gas detecting apparatus comprising a cylindrical insulating body, a coating of adsorption material thereon, an electric circuit including said material, and an indicator controlled by the current flow in said circuit.

3. A gas detecting apparatus comprising an adsorption material, an electric circuit including said material, an indicator controlled by the current flow in said circuit, and an electrical heating element adjacent said material.

4. A gas detecting apparatus comprising an insulating body, a coating of adsorption material thereon, an electric circuit including said material, an indicator controlled by the current flow in said circuit, and a heating element associated with said body.

5. A gas detecting apparatus comprising a hollow cylinder of insulating material, a coating of adsorption material thereon, an electric circuit including said material, yan indicator controlled by the current flow in said circuit, and a heating resistance in said cylinder.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature.

SAMUEL RUBEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2768069 *Jun 5, 1952Oct 23, 1956Factory Mutual Res CorpCombustible gas detector
US2817229 *Oct 30, 1953Dec 24, 1957Honeywell Regulator CoSorbtion gas analysis apparatus
US2866329 *Mar 22, 1955Dec 30, 1958Honeywell Regulator CoGas analysis apparatus
US2928276 *Oct 30, 1953Mar 15, 1960Honeywell Regulator CoMeans for measuring thermoelectrically a constituent of an atmosphere
US2941395 *Jul 21, 1955Jun 21, 1960Honeywell Regulator CoConstituent potential measuring apparatus
US3040561 *Nov 21, 1957Jun 26, 1962Westinghouse Electric CorpHydrogen gauge
US3164004 *May 15, 1961Jan 5, 1965Exxon Research Engineering CoCoated piezoelectric analyzers
US3172730 *Aug 31, 1960Mar 9, 1965 Method and apparatus for the determination
US3242717 *Mar 26, 1963Mar 29, 1966Bendix CorpHydrogen sensor
US3260104 *Oct 24, 1962Jul 12, 1966Exxon Research Engineering CoApparatus for fluid analysis
US3307613 *Sep 3, 1965Mar 7, 1967Honeywell IncControl apparatus
US3329004 *Sep 23, 1963Jul 4, 1967Exxon Research Engineering CoCoated piezoelectric analyzer
US4224595 *Nov 2, 1978Sep 23, 1980Ads Systems, Inc.Graded particle adsorption type sensor and method of improving performance of an adsorbing sensor
US5610324 *Nov 17, 1994Mar 11, 1997Fugitive Emissions Detection Devices, Inc.Fugitive emissions indicating device
US6041645 *Nov 24, 1998Mar 28, 2000Fugitive Emissions Detection Devices, Inc.Fugitive emmissions detection system and components thereof
US6530259Mar 27, 2000Mar 11, 2003Fedd Systems, Inc.Fugitive emissions detection system and components thereof
US6722185Feb 18, 2003Apr 20, 2004Fedd Systems Inc.Fugitive emissions detection system and components thereof
US6819253 *Oct 3, 2002Nov 16, 2004Eai CorporationMethod and apparatus for the collection of near real time confirmation samples
US7073403 *Nov 15, 2004Jul 11, 2006Eai CorporationMethod and apparatus for the collection of samples
US7864064Jan 8, 2009Jan 4, 2011Fugitive Emissions Detection Device, Inc.Fugitive emissions detection devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification73/31.4, 73/31.7, 338/34, 340/632
International ClassificationG01N27/12
Cooperative ClassificationG01N27/12
European ClassificationG01N27/12