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Publication numberUS1561402 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 10, 1925
Filing dateJun 18, 1925
Priority dateJun 18, 1925
Publication numberUS 1561402 A, US 1561402A, US-A-1561402, US1561402 A, US1561402A
InventorsBernwall Arthur E
Original AssigneeBernwall Arthur E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Educational game
US 1561402 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 16,1925 1561,402

' A. E. BERNWALL EDUCATIONAL GAME yFiled June 18. 1925 '2 sheets-sneet 1 El :1J-.1..

EDUCATIONAL GAME Filed June 18, 1925 r2`S`hee"ts-Sho'e\ 2 Ye. Wamego Patented Nov. 10, 1925.

UNITED STATES ARTHUR' a BnanwALr., or JANESVILLE, WlSCONSIN.

EDUCATIGNAL GAME.

Application me@ June is, i325.

To all 'whom t may concern.'

Be it known that I, ARTHUR E. linnn- WALL, a subject of the King of Sweden, residing at Janesville, in the county of Rock and State of IVisconsin, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Edu catonal Games; and I do declare the following to be a full, clear, and enact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

My invention aims to provide a very entertaining and instructive game, symbolic of the epochal flight around the world, by U. S. aviators, and with this object in view, the invention resides in lthe novel subject matter hereinafter fully described and claimed, the description being supplemented by the accompanying drawings.

Figure l is a vertical sectional view partly in elevation of a game apparatus constructed in accordance with my invention.

Figure 2 is a. horizontal sectional View on line 2 2 of Fig. l.

In the drawingsabove briefly described, the numeral l designates a game board which, in the present disclosure, is divided by heavy lines 2, into four plots 3 corresponding to four contiguous of the terrestrial globe, traversed by a circumferential line. These plots 3 are distinctly identified, preferably by having a conspicuous part of each plot, of one particular color, red being preferably employed for one, indicated by the vertical shading, blue being used for another as disclosed by the horizontal shading, green for the third as indicated by incline shade lines, and-white for the portion of the fourth plot, correspondingto the shaded portions of the other plots. Each plot 3 is provided with a blocked path 4--43 leading to a main goal A and preferably having` a sub-goal B between its ends. The blocks of the path l-t are numbered as shown, and this path preferably is colored in the manner above described. `Furthermore, it may here be mentioned that the path is used in advancing one or more chips or game pieces 5, toward the goal A, in a manner `to be hereinafter more fully described. There are preferably two of these game pieces 5, for each of the plots 3, and they are identified with the plots on which they are to be used, by use of colors. Preferably, the plots also bear the names of the renowned world Serial N0. 38,046.

flyers, and each plot is representative of one of the four planes which circumscribed the earth. Twoof the game pieces 5 being assigned to each of these plots, said game pieces also bear the names of the two flyers who were assigned to the particular plane represented bythe plot on which the game v pieces are to vbe used.

In addition to the subject matter above described, each plot 3 is provided with a number of columns 6 containing geographical names falling within certain geographical sub-divisions of the globe. Adjacent a number of these names, are symbols l7 and 8 indicating whether one of the game pieces 5 is to be advanced or moved retrogradely along the path 4, the symbol 7 denoting ad* vancement, being preferably somewhat in the form of a star, While the symbol 8 is by preference a horizontal dash.

To produce an attractive appearance and to constantly keep before the players, the idea that it was American skill which successfully completed the flight around the world, the columns 6 are preferably colored red, white and blue, the symbolic colors of America.

Usable with the game board l, is a terrestrial map, here shown in the form of Aa globe l0 appropriately mounted, but preferably supported in such a manner that it may rotate. Mounted for movement over the surface of the globe 10, I have shown four miniature aircraft ll, which are preferably identified by the same colors as those used on the plots 3, as well as by the same flyers names. The crafts ll are provided with indicators 12 which are co-operable with the globe l0 in determining which of the geographical names of the columns 6 is to be used in determining the direction in which to move one of the game pieces 5, along the path Ll. It may here also be explained that the circumference of the globe is divided by degrees, and'one-fourth of the circumference (900) is allotted to each player. Each of the plots 3 is devoted to one of these 90 sections of the globe. The distance to advance or set back any of the game pieces 5, isA detei-mined by a code which will hereinafter be given.

In addition to bearing geographical names which have been necessarily omitted from the drawing on account of the small scale of the latter, the globe 10 preferably bears spaced, distinctly identified indicia 13, five of these indicating points being preferably allotted to each 90 section of the globe. Preferably, their colors are red, white, blue, green and black.

To understand the operation of the game, we will assume that the four diiierently colored planes l1 and the correspondingly colored plots 3, as wellA as the game pieces for these plots, are assigned to four players. We will also assume, that the player haring the lirst turn, spins the mounting means for the planes 11, so that the latter are made to travel around the globe at any desired Speed, their propellers then rotating to gire a very realistic appearance. 1f the indicator 12 stops at one of the points 13 corresponding to the color of the players plane, this may well count thirty points for the player, so that he will place his first gamel piece 5, on 30 of his respective path e. lf the pointer 12 stops on or very close to a geographical name on the globe 10, correspending to a name listed on the players plot 3, and having a star 7, fifteen points advancement along the path may well be permitted. If the indicator l2 stops at or near a geographical name marked with a star 7 on another players plot of the base, five points advancement of the game piece 5 along the path e could well be allowed. If the aforesaid pointer should stop at a black point 13, this indicates the loss of thirty points for instance., and if this should happen at the beginning of the game, which is unlikely, the player cannot of course place one of his game pieces upon the path 4. When the indicator 12 stops at a geographical name listed on the board l and marked with a dash 8, on the players own plot ffl, live points retrogade movement of the game piece 5 would be called for, but here again if this should take place on the first spin of the player, he could not then of course place one of his game pieces 5 upon tle path Under such circumstances and that set forth in the immediately preceding sentence, it might be permissible to allow the player to have another trial, which is also true, should the condition set forth ef low, arise, that is, if the pointer l2 should stop by a geographical name listed on another players plot 3 and here provided with a dash. Grdinarily, after the game is under way, this could mean a set back for the game piece 5, but if it should happen on the players first spin, a second trial could of course be permitted. lf the pointer stops at any geographical name on the globe 10, corresponding to a name in the player`s` own section of the base and here provided neither with a star 7 or a dash 8, advancement of the game piece 5 is permitted for say five points.

The players of course, follow each other in turn and after any player has advanced one of his game pieces 5 to the goal A, he starts with the second of these game pieces. n one manner of playing the game, when the first game piece is in the goal A and the second game piece is in or beyond the goal B, the game is won by that particular play er.

order to win.

preferably usel a number of chips for each player, in addition to the chips 5, eight* een of these additional chips being preferably allotted to each player, and the player may be penalized a certain number of chips or may gain a number from another player or players, according to circumstances. These circumstances are preferably listed on a code furnished with the game, and thisl code also indicates vthe amount of forward or rearward movement to be given to any the game'pieces The preferred code follows z- THE Conn OF 'ri-1E WORLD FLYERs.

Gains.

Plane stoppingl. At dot of corresponding color 30 points.'

2. At a place marked with a star on the individuals own section of the board l5 points.

3. At a place marked with a star on anothers section of the board 5 points (in chips, from that player).

4. At any place named on the board 1n your own section of the board 5 points.

Losses.

For each fi other players is paid up to the extent of points, etc. 0f course, if four or eight people are playing partners, no player is forced to pay his own partner or partners, but pays up only to the opponents.

lt will be seen from the foregoing that the game will be Very interesting and instructive, both for children and adults.

Various details of construction may be used in carrying the invention into effect. ln the present showing, the game board l constitutes a base for the globe 10, the airln another manner of playing, both ol" 4the game pieces 5 must be in the goal A .n

memos craft 1l, and the mounting means for said globe and aircraft, and when this association of parts is employed, the base is preferably provided With pads l5 to prevent the marring of any furniture upon which which the device may rest. ln the present disclosure, the base is circular and is provided at its center with an appropriate bearing lb' having its axis disposed vertically. litotatably mounted in this b" ing in any suitable manner to rotatey rr ely, is a vertical shaft 17 carrying upwardly and outwardly extending arms 18 Which in turn carry the planes il. rlhis shaft is also pref erably provided with a serrated Wheel 'i9 by means of which it may be readily spun. l have also shown the shaft l?" provided with a if'ertical bearing 20 in Which a spindle 2l, for the globe l0, is mounted in such a manner as to permit free rotation of such globe.

Obviously, all parts of the device may be ornamented in any desired manner, but throughout, the colors red, White and blue are preferably used as much as possible.

l claim l. in a de 'ice symbolizing the World flyers, a terrestrial globe, miniature aircraft at the periphery thereof, and means mounting the aircraft for movement about the globe.

2. In a device symbolizing the World flyers, a terrestrial globe miniature aircraft at the periphery thereof, a plurality of arms carrying the aircraft, and a rotatably mounted member from which said arms project.

ln a device symbolizing the World flyers, a terrestrial globe mounted for free rotation, a miniature aircraft at the periphery of said. globe, and means mounting the aircraft for movement about the globe.

4. ln a device symbolizing the World iiyers, a base having a bearing Whose axis is vertical, a rotatable member mounted in said bearing and itself having a bearing With its axis disposed vertically, a terrestrial globe rotatably supported by the last named bearing, arms projecting outwardly and upwardly from said rotatable member, and miniature rcraft carried by said arms.

5. in a game symbolizing the World flyers, a game board divided into distinctly identified plots representing different areas of the terrestrial. globe, each plot having a blocked path to a goal, along which to move a ,fame piece, said plots bearing geographicai naines ai Il indicia adjacent them giving instructions for moving the game pieces along the blocked paths; a Jterrestrial map, distinctlv identified minature aircraft ated for movement over the surface of nap, and` indicators carried by said rer-art, said indicators being (3o-operable one at a time with the map to determine whichv of the names on the game board is to be conside in moving a game piece along a path of said boar G. ln a game symbolizing the World flyers, a game board divided into distinctly identilied plots representing diirr'i'erent areas of the terrestrial globe, each plot having a blocked path to a goal, along which to move a game piece, said plots bearing geographical naines and indicia adjacent them giving instruciions for moving the game pieces along the blocked paths; a terrestrial map, and indicating means mounted for movement over the surface of said map, said indicating means being co-operable with the map to determine which of the names on the game board is to be considered in moving a game piece along a path of said board,

7. A game as specified in claim 5; said map having distinct points identified in the same manner as the different aircraft and co-operable with the indicators thereof in determining movements of the game pieces.

A game as specified in claim 5; said map having distinct points identified in the same manner as the different aircraft and another distinct point, said points being co operable with the indicators in determining movements of the game pieces.

in testimony whereof l have hereunto adixed my signature.

ARTHUR E. BERNVVALL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2430580 *Feb 1, 1946Nov 11, 1947Pelkola Debs HGame device
US3012780 *Apr 29, 1959Dec 12, 1961Sol FriedmanJet dogfight game
US3149844 *Jan 30, 1961Sep 22, 1964Di Carlo GiuseppeSpinner type of game playing apparatus
US5108115 *Oct 15, 1990Apr 28, 1992Robert BermanInteractive game show and method for achieving interactive communication therewith
US5664785 *Jan 11, 1995Sep 9, 1997Nguyen; Hoang VanAirplane game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/141.00R, 273/252, 434/139, 273/241
International ClassificationA63F5/04, A63F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/04, A63F2003/0444, A63F3/00176, A63F9/0073
European ClassificationA63F3/00B1, A63F3/04, A63F9/00H