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Publication numberUS1562991 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1925
Filing dateNov 16, 1923
Priority dateNov 16, 1923
Publication numberUS 1562991 A, US 1562991A, US-A-1562991, US1562991 A, US1562991A
InventorsEdward A Rudigier
Original AssigneeStandard Dev Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Transportable tank
US 1562991 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. A. RUDIGIER TRANSPORTABLE TANK Nov. 24 1925.

Filed Nov. 16, 1923 FIG. 1.

w W W. Q0 Q Fine; 2']

Patented Nov. 24, 19 25. I

UNITED STATES 1,562,991 PATENT OFFICE.

EDWARD A. RUDIGIER, 0F BALTIMORE, MARYLAND, ASSIGNOR TO STANDARD DE- VELOPMENT COMPANY, A CORPORATION OE DELAWARE.

TRANSPORTAIBLE TANK.

Application filed November 16, 1.923. Serial No. 675,077.

To all whom it may concern: I

Be it known that I, EDWARD A. RUDIGIER, a citizen of the United States, residing at Baltimore, in the State of Maryland,have invented new and useful Improvements in Transportable Tanks, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to transportable tanks and more particularly tanks for carrying materials which are ordinarily diflicult to unload in liquid state by reason of their high melting point. The invention will be understood from the following description, taken in connection with the accompanylng drawing, in which- Fig. 1 is a longitudinal vertical section of a tank-car showing an embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 2 is an end View, on larger scale; and V Fig. 3 is a section on theline III of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows, the scale being that of Fig.- 2.

i A tank 1 is mounted on any desired means of transport, for example railway-trucks 2 and frame 3, and is provided with a top manhole or inlet 4 and a bottom outlet 5 preferably located at the center. The outlet 5 is guarded by any suitable valve'or closure, the detail of which is not material to the'present invention, and preferably is elongated transversely of the tank and affords generally a larger opening than customary with tanks for petroleum distillates. Surrounding the tank, or at least about its greater portion, is a spaced wall 6 forming a jacket for a heating fluid, as steam, inlet connection 7 allowing supply of such fluid and connections 8 being provided at the bottom for outlet and drainage. A'covering of heat-insulation 9 surrounds the jacket and tank ordinarily, but may be omitted where desired. Traversing the tank from end to end are guides 10 upon which are slidably mounted a pair of pistons 11 one piston for travel in each half of the tank In the case of relatively short tanks a single piston will suflice however. Stuffingboxes 12 are provided on the pistons for making adequately tight packing joints on the guldes. At each end of the tank back of the piston is a connection 13 for supply of compressed air or other fluid for propelling the pistons to the center of the tank, and cross supports 14 may be arranged for the guides and to act also as center-stops for the pistons. By making the guides 10 tubular, (or at least hollow in cases where they are not of circular cross-section) and joiningthe ends to the inlet and outlet connections 15, 16, steam or other heating fluid may also be thus supplied therethrough so as to heat the interior of the tank.

In use, material to be shipped, as for example an oxidized asphalt, is run into the tank while molten, the pistons 11 being back in the ends of the tank as shown in Fig. 1. After arrival at the unloading trestle over a receiving tank at the destination, a steam line is attached to the connection 15, and the outletl6 and the drains 8 being properly opened or connected to drain lines, steam is supplied to the tank jacket and to the hollow guides 10 until the asphalt softens sufliciently. With the outlet 5 open, a fluid under pressure, preferably compressed air, is supplied by suitable hose or lines attached to the connections 13, and the pistons 11 are forced along toward the center thus discharging the softened load through outlet 5. In this manner highly oxidized as halts and stiff pitches can be handled as easibly in tank-cars as materials of low melting point, or such other materials may be handled in weather otherwise prohibitive. After discharge of the load the pistons are returned to the ends of the tank, for instance by a fluid under pressure admitted through a central connection 17 the outlet 5 being closed and pressure behind the pistons being released through connections 13, and the tank is ready for another load.

While I have described my invention by reference to certain specific details, it will be understood that this is illustrative and not limitative, and changes may be made which come within the spirit and scope of to end, inlet and outlet means for the ciroulation of a heating fluid through said guides, a pair of pistons fitting the interior of the tank mounted to slide on said guides and having stuffing-boxes thereon, a connection at each end off the tank backfiofaach (piston for su l o a propelling ui an supports f2}; the guides midway of the tank arranged to act also as center stops for the pistons.

2. A transportable tank having a central top manhole inlet and a central bottom outlet, heating means about said tank, a" covering of heat insulation surrounding said heating means and tank, a plurality of tubular guides traversing said tank from end to end, inlet and outlet means for the circulation of a heating fluid through said guides, a pair of pistons fitting the interior of the tank mounted to slide on said guides and having stuffing-boxes thereon, a connection at each end of the tank back of each piston for su ply of a propelling fluid, and supports or the guides midway of the tank arranged to act also as center-stops for the pistons. a

3. A transportable tank having a top infrom end to end, inlet and outlet means for the circulation of a heating fluid through said guides, a pair of pistons fitting the interior of the tank mounted to slide on said guides and having stufling-boxes thereon, and means for actuating said pistons.

41. A transportable tank having a top inlet and bottom outlet, heating means about said tank, 'a plurality of hollow guides traversing said tank, inlet and outlet means for the circulation of a heating fluid through said guides, a piston fitting the interior of the tank mounted to slide on said guides, and means for actuating said piston.

5. A transportable tank having guide members traversing said tank, a piston within the tank mounted to slide on said members, and means for actuating said piston.

EDWARD A. RUDIGIER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2446384 *Nov 26, 1943Aug 3, 1948 Asphalt pump intake
US2726788 *Mar 8, 1951Dec 13, 1955Glidden CoTransportable container and method of emptying crude oleoresin therefrom
US2738749 *Jan 17, 1955Mar 20, 1956Coyle Lines IncCargo vessel for transporting heated cargo and general cargo
US2887251 *Oct 24, 1956May 19, 1959Technical Waxes LtdMeans for the transporting of thermoplastic materials in bulk
US3280301 *Jun 25, 1964Oct 18, 1966Du PontElectrically heated fluid transporting apparatus
US3422771 *Nov 1, 1965Jan 21, 1969Pickands Mather & CoArticulated railway hopper cars
US5305926 *Nov 1, 1990Apr 26, 1994U-Fuel, Inc.Portable fueling facility having fire-retardant material
US5562162 *Mar 21, 1994Oct 8, 1996U-Fuel, Inc.Portable fueling facility
US5657788 *Aug 10, 1995Aug 19, 1997We-Mac ManufacturingLiquid storage container with insulated casing enclosing emergency relief vent
US5884814 *Jun 26, 1997Mar 23, 1999Nelson; Charles M.Method and apparatus for ensuring the pumpability of fluids exposed to temperatures colder than the pour point of such fluids
US5950872 *Oct 1, 1996Sep 14, 1999U-Fuel, Inc.Portable fueling facility
US6039123 *Feb 27, 1998Mar 21, 2000Webb; R. MichaelAbove-ground fuel storage system
US6182710Mar 3, 2000Feb 6, 2001U-Fuel, Inc. (Nv)Method for dispensing fuel
US6216790Dec 9, 1999Apr 17, 2001U-Fuel, Inc. (Nv)Above-ground fuel storage system
US7296601Apr 25, 2005Nov 20, 2007U-Fuel, Inc.Aboveground fueling station with vertical tanks
US20060237092 *Apr 25, 2005Oct 26, 2006Webb R MAboveground fueling station with vertical tanks
US20130001224 *Jun 28, 2012Jan 3, 2013Alton PayneStorage tank
WO1999000322A1Jun 15, 1998Jan 7, 1999Nelson Charles MHeated flexible tank for shipping viscous liquids
WO2001060735A1 *Feb 16, 2001Aug 23, 2001Nelson Charles MMethod and apparatus for shipping bulk materials
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/131, 105/451, 141/82, 222/146.4, 105/247, 126/343.50A, 23/293.00R, 222/389
International ClassificationB65D88/74
Cooperative ClassificationB65D88/744, B61D5/04
European ClassificationB61D5/04, B65D88/74F