Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1563675 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 1, 1925
Filing dateFeb 29, 1924
Priority dateFeb 29, 1924
Publication numberUS 1563675 A, US 1563675A, US-A-1563675, US1563675 A, US1563675A
InventorsTansley George H
Original AssigneeColt S Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic pistol
US 1563675 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 1 1925- 1,563,675

G. H. TANSLEY AUTOMATIC PIsTL Filed Feb. 29, 1924 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Dec. 1, 1925- Y 1,563,675

G. H. TANSLEY AUTOMATIC PISTOL Filed Feb. 29, 1924 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 [l AM!" l 1111:: 5

V g 4 5 f5.

Eig/7 Patented Dec.- 1, 1925.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.`

GEORGE H. TANSLEY, F HARTFORD. CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR T0 COLTS .'PA'J'.'IINJ? FIRE ARMS MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 0F HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, A COB.-

roaA'rIoN' orl coNNEcTIcUT.

AUTOMATIC PISTOL.

To all 'whom t may con-cern.'

Be it known that I, GEoRGE H. TANs'LEr, a. citizen lof the United States, residing 1n Hartford, in the .county of Hartford and Stat/e of Connecticut, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Auto- Amatic Pistols, of which the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part hereof.

The inventionrelates generally to automatic firearms, and more particularly to automatic pistols in which'the several operations, such as the opening of the breech after ring a shot, the extraction and e]ec' tion of the empty cartridge shell, the cocking of the hammer, the presentation and introduction of a loaded cartridge to the chamber of the barrel, and the closing of the breech are automatically effected through theenergy of recoil of the breech closing art. 1 .Y i p The large caliberautomatic pistol of this description, which is the most effective and therefore most to be desired'forl military purposes under service conditions inv the field where great striking power is required ina pistol, is not so desirable as the small caliber automatic pistol for practice purposes, mainly because of the greater cost of the powerful ammunition. y v

Small caliber automatic pistols specially adapted for practice purposes, as heretofore constructed, have usually been much lighter' 85 in weight and differed to a marked degree from the large caliber service pistol in appearance, operation and handling, so that practice with them has not adequatelymet the requirements.- in the military branches of 40- the service of familiarizing the user thereof with the handling of the service pistol. Moreover, the cost of' supplying Atwo complete automatic pistols, -one adapted for service in the field, and the other adapted for target practice, has also been found unduly burdensome. l It is an object of the invention to provide a small caliber automatic pistol adapted for practice purposes which, in appearance," weight and handling, approximates a large caliber automatic pistol adapted for military serv-ice and which overcomes thev Application led February 29, 192.4. Serial No. 685,916.

necessity of providing a complete automatic a magazine, said sets of parts being adapted to accommodate, respectively, the powerful large caliber service cartridges or the smal caliber practice cartridges.

It. s ja further object of the inventio to provide an automatic pistol of the general class hereinbefore described with a simple yet highly eiiicientv buffer for absorbing some ofthe energy of recoil ofthe breech closing part.

It is a further object of the invention to provide an automatic pistol of this general class with novel 'and improved means for stopping thebreech closing part `in a rearward position afterthe magazine has Y become empty and the last cartridge has been fired.

y I Vith these and other objects in' view,the invention consists in the features of construction and the combination of elements which will be hereinafter more fully set forth, and the novel features thereof pointed `out in the claims at the end of the specification.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figs. 1 and 2 show the novel improved small caliber automaticpistol adapted for practice purposes, respectively, in a front view and in a left-hand side view; in the front view, the reater portion of thehandlc has been br en away.

Figs. l and 2 show, for comparison with the pistol shown in. Figs. 1 and f2, corresponding views of a large caliber automatic service United tates Government as the standard istol,- beingl that vadopted by the pistol for the various branches of the military service.

Fig. 3 is a central vertical lon 'tudinal section, on an enlarged scale, of t e upper open position which it occupies after the last cartridge hasbeen removed from the magazine and fired. A

Fig. 3 is 'a central vertical longitudinal section, on the same scale as Fig. 3, and for comparison with said ligure, of the upper portlon of the service pistol; the breeclr slide 1s shown in its rearward open position, cartridges are shown remaining in the magazine, and the barrel and the portion of the magazine shown appear 1n elevatlon.

Fig. 4 is a central vertical longitudinal sect-ion through the upper portion of the improved practice pistol with the greater portion of the barrel and the portion of the magazine shown appearing in elevation; the breech slide is shown in its forward barrel closing position and the hammer, in its cocked position.

Figs. 5,6 and 7 show the breech slide of the improved practice pistol, detached, re spectively in a front view, in a vertlcal transverse section taken some distance in rear of the front face of the breech closing part of the slide and as seen from the front, and in a central vertical longitudinal section.

Figs. 5, 6 and 7 a show the breech slide of the service pistol, detached, in views corresponding to and for comparison -with Figs. 5, 6 and 7, respectively.

Fig. 8 shows the reaction spring of the improved practice pistol in the uncom pressed condition and in its relation to the front tubular plug and the guide rod and buffer; the buffer shown in central vertical longitudinal section.

Fig. 9 is a rear end view ofthe reaction spring guide rod and the buffer.

Figs. 10 and 11 show the barrel of the improved pistol, detached, and with the ejector seated thereon, respectively, in a lefthand side view and in a rear end view.

Similar reference numerals refer to similar parts throughout the several views.

accordance with thev invention, is common to the large caliber service pistol and to the small caliber practice pistol, is shown provided with the usual hammer 7, the sear 8, the safety or disconnector 9, the grip-lever 10, the combined sear and safety spring 11. the combined slide-lock and hammer-lock 12 and the magazine catch 21 all of which correspond in structure and function with the similar parts shown and described in the prior patents for firearms granted to J. M.

rowning, No. 984,519 dated February 14, 1911, and No. 1,070,582, dated August 19, 1918, and further description `of these elements, exce t as they co-operate with other elements o the novel improved pistol, is therefore believed to be unnecessary.

In the large caliber service pistol, see Figs 2 and 3, the barrel 2 is connected to 6 the frame 1 by means of a link 14* and the In the drawings, the frame 1, which, in

hinge pin 13 passin through aligned transverse oles in sai frame and said `link, which connection permits the barrel to have limited longitudinal movement i'or locking it to and unlocking it from the breechslide 3a in the manner fully set forth in the aforementioned prior Patent No. 984,519.

In the improved practice pistol, the barrel 2 has near its rear end an integral downward' rejection or lug 14' havin a laterally ref uced lower portion 14', see ig. 11; said lug lits loosely in a corresponding seat in the frame 1 some distanceV forward of the magazine seat in saicl\fra1ne,'see Figs.

3 and 4, and is provided with a transverse' hole to receive the same pin 13, used alterna# tivelyto connect the movable barrel 2 of the large caliber service pistol to the frame,

' to fixedly secure the small caliber barrel 2 to the frame, compare Figs. 3 and 3a.

A comparison of these two figures, and also of`Figs. l and l, shows that the barrel 2 is considerably heavier than the barrel 2, because the two barrels are of substantially the same external diameter, but have bores of different calibers. This additional weight in the barrel 2, being located well forward with reference to the pistol as a whole, reduces thel tendency in arms of this class to disturb the aim after each shot because of therupward kick at the muzzle. Furthermore, it compensates for the decreased weight of the breech slide 3, now to be described, as compared with the weight of the breech slide 3a of the service pistol, so that the total weight of the practice pistol is kept substantially equal to the total weight of the service pistol, which is desirable ,in order to more readily familiarize the shooter with the handling of service pistols while using the practice pistol.

The breech slide 3 of the improved pracpistol like the breech slide 3'L of the large caliber service pistol, is mounted on the frame 1, together with its cooperating barrel, upon the usual guides which keep said slide vertically on the frame. rear portion of the slide 3 forms, in a usual manner, the breech closing block 3 which carries the longitudinally'extending springreracted firing pin 6 adapted to be struck by the hammer 7. Forward of said breech closing block 3 the slide covers the barrel, having substantially the shape of an invert# ed U in transverse section except at its forward end, where the bottom or the slide is closed in the usual manner by the downwardly extending tubular abutment 3, see Figs. 5 and 7, which receives the forward end of thereaction spring 4, see Figs. 3 and 4.

From the foregoing description, and from al comparison of Figs. 1 and 2 with Figs. 1l and 2", it will be evident that the breech slide 3 of the imp--ved practice pistol closely The 3 than in the breechsIide v3, and the rear` charges of-powder resembles 1n external a surance-and con'-A figuration the breech sh e 3* ofthe servicepistol, but, as is more-particularly brought out by the comparisonof Figs. 3, 5, 6 and 7 with Figs. 3, 5, 6" and' 7, differs therefrom to a marked degree 'in weight,- being of a. much lighterconstructionl than -thel slide 3a. In these views the-walls of the 'forward portion of the slide covering'` the barrel are shown to be much thinner in thebeech slide breech closing portion' 3" of the slide 3 is shown to be greatly' lighten'ed by the skeleton construction shown vin the transverse section Fig. 6 and in dotted lines in Fig. 7.

This lighter construction of the breech slide 3 as comp-aredwith the'y slide 3a, vis as is should be, for thef" reasons-hereinbefore stated and also for the kfollowing reasons: While a breech slide of'great weight is highly necessary inthe service pistol in which the energy of recoil of the slide must -not only compressv the reaetiongspring, in its rearward movement,l but-must also lmove the barrel rearward until itsfrear end isiswung y down ftoeffect *theunlocking. of the breech slide andbarrehin the automatici.. practice pistol adaptedjrto usci-cartridges having light compared with the heavy charges requi' theservice ammunition, such acons r, 10' would not be practicable, becausethepressure' of the gases developed by the 'lightucliarges -would not be capable of opening the; breech to the required extent against the' tension of thereaction spring.

The forward end of the breech slide of the improved practice pistol is provided with the usual bushing 16 for supporting the forward end of the barrel 2, and this bushing has a downward projection adapted to form an abutment for receiving the thrust`of the reaction spring 4, which returns the breech slide to its forward barrel-closing position. The reaction Spring 4 isless powerful than the reaction spring 4 of the service pistol,

'for the same reason as that which makes it necessary to have the slide 3 lighter than the slide 3a of the service piston. Said reaction sp-ring extends at its forward portion into the usual tubular plug 24 adapted to lock the bushing 1G against rotation in the usual mannerand to transmit the tension of said .reaction spring to the bushingI 16 and, through it, tothe breech slide 3. At its rear end, the teitxsion' ofthe reaction spring is transmitted to the frame through the reaction sprin g guide rod 5, the enlarged head 5 of which, see Figs. 3 and 4, rests against a vertical shoulder 1 on the frame, in a lmarmer similar to the known construction inthe large caliber service pistol, see Fig. 3, and as disclosed .in the priorv Patent No.

Y y 984,519. hereinbefore referred to.

To cushion the blowv yofi-the breechA slide 3 r at the end of its recoil, a compact and highly eiiicient buffer 15 is provided. Said buffer 15 may comprise suitable resilient means, such as a plurality of resilient disks, supported forward of the head 5 of the reaction spring guide rod 5, said disks being preferably frictionally held on said rod, see Figs.

movement, the rear surface of the tubular abutment 3 at the forward end of the 'breech slide strikes the foremost of said i resilient disks, and thus' the blow of the slide is transmitted to the frame through the resilient buffer and thereby effectively cushioned. Moreover, the buffer also serves to limit the recoil of the slide, and by its rebound after it has arrested theslide, the buffer assists the reaction springl 4- in return-- ing the breech slide to its forward breech closing position.

Since the frame of the improved-practice pistol is the same as that used in the service pistol, and therefore has a magazine seat in the handle capable of receiving a maga` zine18a adapted to hold/ the large caliber service cartridges, see Fig. 3, a separate magazine adapted to occupy said seat and to hold and present small caliber practice cartridges in position to be transferred by the breech slide into the barrel chamber, is provided for the practice pistol. In Figs. 3 and 4, the upper portion of one form of magazine which will' serve this-'purpose is shown. Such magazine may comprise an inner casing 18 adapted to receive said small caliber cartridges and having 'a magazinev follower 19 actuated by a spring 20 to raise the cartridges to the mouth of the magazine; said inner casing 18 is enclosed vexcept at its upper end in an outcl` casing 18 adapted to fit the seat in the handle of the frame 1. Suitable means secure the inner casing against movement relative to the outer casing; such means may comprise those shown in Figs. 3 and 4, where the upper portion of the inner casing 18 is secured against lateral movement by thc upper portions ofthe sides of the outer ca sing 18 which are bent inward against the sides of the inner casing, see Fi g. 4, and against movement in a direction longitudinally of the pistol by a filler piece 18, see Fig. 3, extending from the roar wall of the outer casing 18 to the rear wall of' the inner casing 18 and keeping -the forward wall of saidinner casing resting against the `forward -wall of the outcrzcasing. The outer for stopping the breech slide 3 in a rearward position, as shown in Fig. 3, after the last cartridge has been removed from the magazine and fired, thereby notifying the shooter that the magazine is empty. Such means comprise the magazine follower 19. which has for this purpose an integral stop 19 provided with a substantially vertical rear shoulder adapted, when the follower is moved to its uppermost position under the tension of the follower spring after the recoil of the breech slide due to the tiring of the last cartridge, to project into the path of the central longitudinal depending rib on the breech closing block 3.,Jso that in the first part of its return movement under the tension of the reaction spring, said slide is arrested by the engagement of the vertical rear shoulder on the stop 19 of the follower 19 with a corresponding shoulder formed by the front end of the said depending rib on the breech closing block 3. In order that such stoppage may be effected wit-hout. shock, it is desirable that said stop be constructed so as to cushion the blow of the breech slide when it engages the stop. By the novel improved construction this object is attained by forming the stop 19 as a relatively thin integral rear portion or tongue connected to the follower body proper only at its lower end, see Fig. 3. The follower 19, particularly the rear portion thereof comprising the integral stop 19 being made of metal having a spring temper, the in tegral stop 19 thereon will act in the manner of a stifl'l leaf spring, so that, when its upper vertical rear surface is struck by the slide,'said stop can yield forwardly, thereby cushioning the blow of the slide, and thus avoiding all possibility of battering of the contacting surfaces on the stop arid the slide by the repeated stopping of said slide in the use of the improved pistol. In this way an e'ective yielding stop for the breech slide is provided without the use of any extra parts. If the magazine is removed when the 'parts are in .the position shown in Fig. 3,

the breech slide 3 will be released and then returned to its forward barrel closing position by the tension of the reaction spring 4t. Should it be desired to retain the slide in the open position, while the magazine is being removed and a filled magazine inserted into the seat in the frame, this may be donc by moving the slide rearward a short. distance from the position shown in Fig. 3 until the recess 3 in the slide, see Fig. 2, stands above the usual upward projection on the crank arm 13 of the barrel securing pin 13, and then moving said arm by pressure against the thumb-piece thereon upwardly, thereby bringing the square rear end of said projection in front of the square rear end of said recess 3 in the slide. The slide is thuskept at the rear in the open posit-ion until the crank arm 13 is manually depressed to withdraw the projection thercon from said recess in the slide.

The construction and arrangement of the spring retracted firing pin 6 of the practice pist-ol corresponds with. that of the tiring pin 6 of the service pistol, compare Figs. 3 and 7 with Figs. 3 and 7a, e'xcept that the firing point of theiring pin 6 is square in order to more effectively co-operate with the small caliber rim fire ammunition, whereas the point of the tiring pin 6a is rounded.

The extractor 22 of the practice pistol is arranged in a longitudinal seat therefor on the right-hand side of the breech slide 3 in a manner similar to the arrangement of the extractor 22L in the slide 3a, and as disclosed in the prior Patent No. 984,519 hereinbefore referred to. It is obvious, however, that the hooked forward portion of the extractor which projects beyond thefront face of the breech closing block 3 is necessarily arranged nearer vto the center of the breech block than is the corresponding portion of the extractor 22a, compare Figs. and 5a. Also, the said hooked portion of the extractor 22 is preferably pressed inward with less tension than the corresponding portion of the extractor 22,

The breech closing` block 3 is provided with a recess in its front face, see Fig. 1, to receive the head of a cartridge seated in the barrel chamber, and the barrel 2 has on its right-hand side a horizontal recess, see Fig. 1l, having a laterally and outwardly inclined forward Wall to receive lthe forward end of the extractor in the usual manner when the breech slide is in its forward position. The barrel is further provided with a short rearward projection below the bore thereof, said projection having an upward and forward inclined rounded guiding surface, see Figs. 8, et and ll, to guide the bullet end of each cartridge successively into the barrel 'chamber during its transfer from the magazine into said chamber by the forward movement of the breech slide.

In the construction of the improved practice pistol it has been found desirable to mount the ejector 23 on a part of said pistol, such as the barrel 2, which is interchangeable with a corresponding part ol" the service pistol. To this end, the barrel 2 has at its rear end and 'on the left-hand side thereof a longitudinal groove. ending in a transverse groove, said groove forming a seat for the'eorresponding forward portion of the ejector 23, see Figs. 10 and l1, whereby the same is held against longitudinal and rotary movement relative to said barrel. The wall of the breechslide 3 covering the barrel serves to keep the ejector in its seat on the barrel 2 when the parts are in assembled position. The inward projection 23 imams i at the rear end of the ejector 23 is adapted to engagethe head of a cartridge being extracted by the recoil of the breech slide and throw said cartridge laterally vthrough the ejection opening. in said. breech slide in the usual manner.

Frm the foregoing deseri tion ofthe construction ando eration o the various y. artsl of the novel improved' istol it is be- -ieved that the operation of t e istol as a whole will be readily understo and that 'further description of such operation is un-'pnecessary. v y,

It will be seen t at a'construction has been provided whereby an. automatic pistol of the locked type, that `is,4 one in which the breech slide is "positively locked in barrel closing position until the bullet has left the -barrel after firing a shot, can be readily converted, 'at will, by the interchange of relatively few parts, from a large caliber pistol adapted for military service in the i field to a small caliber practice pistol of the' plstols adapted for diverse. uses, he need carry only, in addition to the standard large caliber service pistol, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2", the small caliber .barrel 2 and 'breech slide 3 with the parts mounted thereon, the' reaction spring 4 and parts immediately associated therewith as shown in Fig. 8, and the magazine 18, 18 adapted to carry the small caliber cartridges. The change from an automatic service pistol to the improved target pistol may then be readily elected in the following manner:

The magazine catch 21 is pressed toward the right to release the magazine 18a'vwhich then drops out of its seat in the handle.

'Theibreech slide 3' is then drawn rearward untilizthepivot pin 13 can be laterally removedto the left. The barrel 2, breech slide 3 2nd reaction spring 4 with the reaction ,rihg guide'rod 5 can now be slid forwar y o ...the frame 1. The barrel 2 of the practice pistol, the breech slide 3 and the reaction spring 4with its 'de rod 5 carrying the buffer 15, allof which have been first brought together in their assembled relation with each other substantiall as shown in Fig. 4, except that before., t ese parts are assembled on the frame 1, the head of the reaction spring 4guide rod 5 rests against the forward face of the barrel lug 14, are then together slid upon the frame-,1 from the front until the transverse hole in the barrel lug is in line with the transverse holes in the frame, when the pin 13 is inserted into said aligned holes from the left and therebv locks all said parts in assembled relation with` the frame l 1.

magazine 18,18', adapted to hold small calibercartridges is now inserted in the niaga-l zine seat in the handle of the frame 1, in v which it is kept by the magazine catch 21. The arm is now ready for use as a practice pistol. The change from the practice pistol to the service 4pistol is elfected in substantially the same manner.

,While I have hereinbefore; described my invention as embodied in a small caliber practice pistol, it -will be obvious that certain features thereof are applicable to' other firearms, and I therefore d o not intend to limit their application to this particular type of firearms. Various changes in form and arrangement of parts also may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

` 1. In a small caliber automatic pistol, the` combination of the frame of a standard large, caliber automatic pistol of the locked type, a small caliber barrel mounted on said frame, and a blow back breech slide of similar configuration to, but of considerably less weight than, the breech slide of said standard pistol. v

2. In a small caliber automaticv pistol, the` combination of the frame of .a standard large caliber automatic pistol of the locked type, with 'a xed small caliber f barrel and a blow back breech slide, said barrel and breech slidehaving substantially the outside configuration and the combined weight of the corresponding parts in said standard pistol, whereby a small caliber automatic pistol similar in appearanceand operation to said standard pistol is produced.

3. In a small caliber automatic pistol, the combination of the frame and the parts' more or less permanently associated with said frame of a standard large caliber automatic pistol having a recoiling barrel and i a locked breech slide, a small caliber barrel mounted on said frame, and a blow back breech slide associated with said frame and with said barrel,- said breech slide being similar in general configuration but considerably lighter in weight than the breech slide of said standard pistol.

4. In a small caliber automatic pistol, the combination of the frame of a standard large caliber automatic pistol, a barrel fixedly mounted on said frame, a breech slide of similar configuration to but of considerably less weight than the breech slide of said standard pistol, associated with said frame and with said barrel, a reaction spring to return said breech slide after the recoil thereof due to the firing of a shot, a guide rod restingagainst said frame and supportlas and a buier carried by said4 guide rod, said buffer serving to absorb the excess of energy of the breech slide at the end of its recoil and co-o erating with the reaction spring to 'return t e breech slide. 'u

5. In a small caliber automatic pistol, the combination of the frame of a standard large caliber automatic pistol having a recoilng barrel and a recoiling breech slide normally locked to said barrel, a small caliber barrel ixedly mounted on said frame, a breech slide of generally similar coni ration to, but of considerably less weig t than, the breech slide of said standard pistol, and resilient means for cushioning the blow of the breech slide at the end of its recoil.

6. In an automatic istol, the combination of a frame, a reeoiling breech slide supportedthereby, a reaction spring for returnin said slide after the recoil thereof, a guide rod for the rear portion of said spring having a head resting against said frame, and a buiier for said slide surrounding said rod between the end' of said spring and said head. f

7. In an automatic istol, lthe combination of a frame, a reeoilmg breech slide supported thereby, a reaction spring, a guide rod for the rear portion of said spring having a head, and a bu'er for the breech slide arranged ,between said head and said spring, said buffer comprisingr a plurality of resilient washers. l 8. In an automatic nistol, the combination cfa frame, a recoillng breech slide supported "tli'ereby, a reaction spring, a guide rod for said spring resting I against said frame, a shoulder on'y said guide rod, and a buffer for the breech slide forward of said shmlder and frictionally held on said guide ro Y 9. In an automatic firearm, the combination of aframe, a cartridge magazine seated `in said frame and having a follower for automatically moving the cartridges toward the mouth of the magazine, a barrel, a breech closing member having longitudinal movement to open and close' the breech ofthe barrel, and means for stopping said member in a rearward position without shock after the last cartridge has been removed from the magazine and fired, said means com rising an integral resilient portion of sai follower adapted to project into the path of member. I

10. In an automatic firearm, the combination of a frame, a barrel, a breech closing -member -movable to open and close the breech of the barrel, a cartridge magazine carried by said frame, a follower for automatically moving the cartridges toward the mouth of a shoulder on said breech closing' said magazine, and means for stopping said breech -closing member'in a rearward position without shock after the last cartridge i ha's been removed from the magazine and fired, said means comprising an integral spring tongue on said follower vadapted to project into the path of a shoulder on said breech closing member.

11. In an automatic practice pistol, the combination of the frame of a standard automatic service pistol, a barrel adapted to use small caliber cartridges mounted on said frame, and a blow back breech slide covering said barrel and similar in external configuration to the breech slide of said service pistol but considerably lighter in weight to permit the proper automatic functioning of the pistol with the small caliber ammunition, whereby an automatic practice pistol similar in appearance and operation to the standard service pistol is produced.

l2. As an article of manufacture, a convertible automatic pistol comprising a single frame, a plurality of breech slides of diiferent weights but of similar configuration adapted to be selectively mounted on said frame, a plurality of barrels of diii'erent calibers corresponding to the breech slides of diierent weights, and a plurality of magazines adapted to receive cartridges corresponding to the different barrels, whereby automatic pistols of different power and adapted for diverse uses but similar in general appearance and operation may, at will, be produced by combining any one of the sets of parts comprising a barrel, a breech slide and a magazine with said single frame.

13. As an' article of manufacture, a convertible automatic pistol comprising a common frame and interchangeable sets of parts adapted to -be Vselectively .operatively associated with said common `frame, said sets of parts comprising respectively, a large caliber barrel, a breech slide corresponding thereto and a magazine adapted to receive large caliber cartridges corresponding to said barrel and breech slide, and a small caliber barrel, a breech slide of similar configuration to said first named breech slide but of considerably less weight, and a magazine adapted to receive small caliber cartridges corresponding to said small caliber barrel and the breech slide associated therewith, whereby automatic pistols of similar appearance and operation but adapted for diverse uses may, at will, be produced by' operatively associating either of said sets of parts with saidcommon frame.

This specification signed at Hartford, in the county of Hartford and State of Connecticut, this 26th day of February, 1924.

GEORGE H. TANSLEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2489816 *Sep 13, 1948Nov 29, 1949Reilly Desmond FBarrel mounting for automatic pistols
US2522192 *Jul 6, 1948Sep 12, 1950Porter Percy LRecoil reducer
US2587937 *Apr 30, 1948Mar 4, 1952Waltke Jr Edwin HBarrel construction for firearms
US2627686 *May 18, 1951Feb 10, 1953Shockey Richard LRecoil reducer and accuracy improver
US3110223 *Jul 21, 1960Nov 12, 1963Schlappich Stuart AReconditioned firearms
US3252237 *Sep 21, 1964May 24, 1966Robert KorzeniewskiGun barrel seating device
US3327421 *Sep 28, 1965Jun 27, 1967Philip FinkelsteinRight and left hand pistol grip
US3657959 *Aug 14, 1969Apr 25, 1972Kart Frederick HAutomatic pistol and sub-caliber conversion therefor
US3756121 *Oct 26, 1971Sep 4, 1973Colt Ind Operating CorpCombination action spring guide and buffer for automatic pistol
US3772812 *Mar 26, 1973Nov 20, 1973Day RSub-caliber conversion unit
US4542606 *Jul 13, 1983Sep 24, 1985Pachmayr Gun Works, Inc.Pistol structure
US4580484 *Apr 13, 1984Apr 8, 1986Moore Wildey JFirearm and firearm conversion unit
US4974493 *Dec 20, 1988Dec 4, 1990Yeffman Paul LShock absorbing buffer and recoil reducer
US5060555 *Mar 30, 1990Oct 29, 1991Smith & Wesson Corp.Slide decelerator for a firearm
US5076139 *Aug 29, 1990Dec 31, 1991Hiett Charles ABuffer for firearms
US5433134 *Oct 5, 1993Jul 18, 1995Leiter; Edward J.Blank firing conversions for semiautomatic pistols
US5585589 *Aug 30, 1994Dec 17, 1996Leiter; Edward J.Blank firing conversions for semiautomatic pistols
US5675106 *Jun 7, 1995Oct 7, 1997Leiter; Edward J.Blank firing conversions for semiautomatic pistols
US5829180 *Sep 25, 1995Nov 3, 1998Leiter; Edward J.Firearm adapted to fire blank ammunition
US6314859Nov 30, 1999Nov 13, 2001Heckler & Koch GmbhSelf-loading pistol conversion kit for a locked self-loading pistol and a weapon system composed of an optionally locked or unlocked self-loading pistol
US6684547Oct 31, 2001Feb 3, 2004Cape AerospaceFirearm recoil dampening assembly
US7121035Sep 24, 2004Oct 17, 2006Dwight GreerSight-preserving, partially self-cleaning, divergent-axis caliber conversion in handguns
US7827720 *Jul 28, 2008Nov 9, 2010Saim Alper ErdemAutoloading handgun
US8752474 *Jul 25, 2011Jun 17, 2014Chester F. VanekAutoloading pistol design
US20120085225 *Jul 25, 2011Apr 12, 2012Vanek Chester FAutoloading pistol design
DE2442107A1 *Sep 3, 1974Mar 6, 1975Frank S ThomasHalbautomatische feuerwaffe
EP1102025A2 *Nov 17, 2000May 23, 2001SNC Technologies Inc.Cartridge ejection mechanism for converted automatic pistol
WO1998054532A2 *May 29, 1998Dec 3, 1998Heckler & Koch GmbhSelf-loading pistol, conversion kit for locking self-loading pistols and weapons system for assembling optionally a locking or non-locking self-loading pistol
WO2013066937A1 *Oct 31, 2012May 10, 2013Cubic CorporationMagazine for simulated tetherless pistols with lockback
Classifications
U.S. Classification89/128, 89/198, 89/138, 42/49.2, 89/196, 89/163, 42/7
International ClassificationF41A17/38, F41A3/00, F41A17/00, F41A17/36, F41A11/00, F41A11/02, F41A3/86
Cooperative ClassificationF41A17/38, F41A11/02, F41A3/86, F41A17/36
European ClassificationF41A11/02, F41A3/86, F41A17/36, F41A17/38