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Publication numberUS1564232 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1925
Filing dateJul 22, 1925
Priority dateJul 22, 1925
Publication numberUS 1564232 A, US 1564232A, US-A-1564232, US1564232 A, US1564232A
InventorsGolden Daniel J
Original AssigneeGolden Daniel J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sporting shoe
US 1564232 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 8, 1925. 1,564,232

D. J. comm- N SPORTING SHOE Filed July 22.- 1925 nZG-olden 6MM @Mv azzj.

3---3 of Figures 1 and 2.

Ashows diagrammatically PATENT OFFICE.

DANIEIH'I-I GOLDEN, QF BBOCKTOIL MASSACHUSETTS.

SPORTING SHOE.

Application led July 22, 1925. Serial No.' 45,158.

4To all whom it 'may cof/wem.'

J. GOLDEN,

Be it known that 1,'DAN11EL` y residing at citizen of the United States,

Brockton, in the county of Plymouth and' State of Massachusetts, have invented new\mar and useful Improvements in Sporting Shoes,

of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to shoesworn by artieipants in athletic games, and particuarly running.

The object of the invention is to provide a -strong and durable shoe of relatively inex- .pensive construction, and having a bottom which is relatively stiff at its Afore portion and has extremely flexible shank and heel end portions.

The invention is embodied in a shoe having a two-part outsole composed of a relatively stiff tap or fore part member and a thinner and more flexiblerear-member forming a shank and heel piece, an insole and an upper, the insole having a novel form whereby, although it is adapted to engage the lasting tacks used to temporarily secure the.upgr during the lasting operation, it is free om engagement at its rear portion with the permanent upper-attaching stitches, so that the rear portion of the insole does Anot impair the flexibility of the rear member of the outsole. Of the accompan ing-drawings forming a art of this speci cation,-

igure 1 isa bottom plan viewof a shoe embodying the invention.

Figure 2 is a section on line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is an enlarged section online Figure 4 is a longitudinal vsection of 'the two-part outsole.l l

Figure 5 is a side view of theinsole and the arrangement of the ugper-securing stitches hereinafter describe Figure 6 is a side view of the relatively flexible rear member of the outsole and shows diagrammatically the arrangement of he stitches securing the upper to said mem- Figure 7 shows in bottom'portion of a last and the insole and upper lasted thereon.

The same reference characters indicate the same parts in allof the figures.

The insole of my improved shoe, shown separately by Figure 5, has the usual form longitudinal section the' Aor area at its fore portion 12, whereby it is adapted to be engaged b McKay stitches uniting the fore portlon o an upper thereto, and has a'reduced vrear portion 13 whose 'n is formed to -lie withinthe stitches unitmg the rear portion of the upper to the rear portion of an insole in an ordinary McKay sewed shoe.

The upper 14 1s lasted on the fore porx tion. 12 and on the reduced rear portion 13, the insole being seated on a last 1 5, and the intnrned edge of the upper being seated on the insole and temporarily secured thereto by lasting vtacks 16 as shown by Figure 7.

The outsole is com osed of two parts viz, a relatively thick an sti fore vpart or tap member 17, preferably of sole leather, and a relatively thin andA fiexible rear member 18 shownseparately by Figure 6, said member constituting a` shank and heel piece, and preferably made of s lit leather. The said members overlap eac other and the overlapping portions are irmly united, preferably by a transverse row of stitches v1S) formedv before applying the outsole' to the temporarily connected upper and insole. The forward end of the rear member 13 has a skived face as shown by Figures 3 and 4, and the rear end ortion of the tap member is seated on-t-he s 'ved face.

After theupper and in'sole are removed from the last,` the fore portion of the upper is united to the upper and to the fore portion 12 of the-insole b McKay stitches 20 laid in a channel 21 igure 4) in the tap member 17, the extent and rela-tive arrangement of these stitches being shown diagrammatically by Figure 5. The rear ortion of theupper is united to the relative y flexible rear member 18 b McKa stitches 22 laid in a channel 23 igure 4 in said member. The stitches 22 are formed outside the margin of the rear portionl-of the insole, the extent and relative arrangement of these stitches bein shown diagrammatically by Figures 5 an 6. i

It will now be seen that the insole permits the usual lasting of the upper, and that its reduced rear portion 13 is free from attaching stitches, so that the flexibility f'- the rear member 18 of the two-part 4outsole is not impaired by the insole. The midlength portion of the insole forms a bridge across the joint formed by theoverlapping portions of the outsole members, so that a smooth internal surface is provided at this point and elsewhere, as shown by Figure 2.

A thin steel plate 24 to which are riveted spurs or spikes 25, may be secured by rivets 26 to the tap member 17 before the application of the outsole to the upper and insole, the plate bearing on the inner surface of the tap member, and the spurs projecting through holes in said member.

The contour of t-he insole in shown by alternating longer and shorter lines in Figure 1, which also shows rivets 27 uniting the tap member 17, the rear member 18, the upper, and t-he insole, at points between the terminal stitches 20 and the terminal stitches 22, the rivets compensating for any lack of strength due to the fact thatl the stitches 22 are not continuations of the stitches 20.

The plate 24 constitutes a stifi'ening element which suitably stiens the tap member 17 and the portion 12 of the insole, and enables the insole to be made of lminimum thickness and maximum flexibility from end to end.

I claim:

1. A sporting shoe comprising an insole having the usual form at its fore portion whereby it is adapted to be engaged by stitches uniting` the fore portion of an upper thereto, and a reduced rear ortion whose margin is formed to lie Within the stitches unitmg the rear portion of the upper to the rear portion of the usual insole, an upper lasted on the fore portion and on the reduced rear portion of the insole, a two-part outsole composed of a relatively thick and stiH tap member and a relatively thin and flexible rear member constituting a shank portion of the insole, and stitches formed outside the margin of the reduced rear portion of the inso e and uniting the rear portion of the upper to the relatively flexible rear member of the outsole, the insole permitting the4 usual lasting of the upper and forming a continuous bridge across the joint formed by the overlapping portions of the outsole members, the reduced rear portion of the insole being free from att-aching stitches so that the flexibility of the rear member of the outsole is not impaired by the insole.

2. A sporting shoe as specified by claim 1, comprising also rivets uniting the tap member, the rear member, the upper, and the insole, at points between the terminalv stitches uniting the fore portion of the upper to the tap and the fore portion of the insole, and the terminal stitches uniting the rear portion of the upper to the rear member of the outsole.

3.- A sporting shoe as specified .by claim 1, comprising also .a plate riveted tothe tap member and interposed between said member and the fore portion of the insole, said plate stiiening the fore part of the bottom and having spurs riveted thereto and'project ing through holes in the tap member.

In testimony whereof I have aixed my signature.

DANIEL J. GOLDEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3402484 *Oct 24, 1966Sep 24, 1968Eugen BruttingSport shoe
US4053995 *Jul 23, 1976Oct 18, 1977Melvin SheinOrthopedic shoe
US4155180 *Feb 27, 1978May 22, 1979American Fitness, Inc.Footwear for more efficient running
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/129, 36/59.00R, 36/67.00D
International ClassificationA43B5/00, A43B5/06
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/06, A43B5/00
European ClassificationA43B5/06, A43B5/00