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Publication numberUS1565318 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1925
Filing dateApr 6, 1925
Priority dateApr 6, 1925
Publication numberUS 1565318 A, US 1565318A, US-A-1565318, US1565318 A, US1565318A
InventorsFisher Ernest F
Original AssigneeFisher Ernest F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Separator
US 1565318 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 15, 1925 1,565,318

E. F. FISHER SEPARATOR Filed April 6, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 AvvEMroze:

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Dec; 15, 1925- 1,565,318

E. F. FlSHER SEPARATQR Filed April 6, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Mum/ram Patented Dec. 15, 1925.

UNITED STATES ERNEST F. FISHER, OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI.

SEPARATOR.

Application filed April 6, 1925. Serial No. 21,052.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known thatI, ERNEST F. FisHnn, a citizen of the United States, residing at St. Louis, in the State of Missouri, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Separators, of which't-he following is a specification.

My invention has relation to improvements in separators for use in dust collecting systems, and consists in the novel features of construction more fully set forth in the specification and pointed out in the claims.

Briefly the invention consists in a tubular housing into which the dust-laden air is discharged and caused to swirl downwardly in an annular space by its own velocity together with the action of helical vanes. The dust particles are discharged from the ends of the vanes, which are adjustable, and the air discharges into a central cylinder free from dust.

The principal object of the invention is the provision of adjustment at the discharge end of the helical vanes to regulate the speed of discharge of the dust particles and also the size of the air discharge opening from the separator chamber. The advantage of this adjustment is that the separator eiiiciency can be maintained at its maximum through a wide variation of material handled. Further advantages will be better apparent from a detailed description of the inventipn in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a combined side elevation and vertical longitudinal section of the separator housing; Fig. 2 is a horizontal cross-section taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the lower end of the cylinder carrying the helical vanes looking in a direction at'right angles to that of Fig. 1; Fig. 4 is a bottom plan of the air receiving cylinder removed from casing; Fig. 5 is a combined side elevation and vertical longitudinal section of a modified form of separator; and Fig. 6 is a horizontal cross-section taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 5.

Referring to the draWings, 1 represents a cylindrical casing with a conical discharge hopper 2 for the dust, or other waste product, and an air outlet 3 for the air after the dust has been separated therefrom. The air outlet pipe 3 adjoins the casing 1 at the top and an inlet 4 for the dust-laden air is provided in the side of the casing 1 near the top thereof.

The casing 1 is provided at the inlet 4 with a tangentiallyxvdisposed neck 5 to which may be connected the conduit or the'collecting system (not-shown). An air receiving cylinder 6 is disposed within the casing 1, said cylinder being of substantially the same diameter as the outlet pipe 3, the lower end of which it engages, and said cylinder extending downwardly to the upper end of the hopper 2.

There are two helical vanes 7 of one complete turn each disposed around and secured to the cylinder 6, the Width of said vanes being equal to that of the space between the cylinder 6 and casing 1 (except for clearance in inserting the cylinder into the casing). For the last quarter'of each vane .it is free from the cylinder (see Fig. 1) and said vane has formed integrally with it an extension 8 extending over about one-quan ter of the area of the cylinder. Hinged to this extension at 9 is a flap 10 adapted to cover one quarter of the area of the cylinder adjacent to the quarter covered by the extension 8, said flap serving a's'an air d1scharge adjustment valve. Thus the extension 8 and flap 10 of one vane cover one half of the lower end of cylinder 6, while the extension 8 and flap 10 of the other vane cover the opposite half of the lower end of cylinder 6. Obviously, if both extensions 8 and both flaps 10 are held against the end of cylinder 6, the cylinder will be completely closed at this end. Reversely, it the extensions 8 and flaps 10 are withdrawn from the end of the cylinder 6, then the cylinder may be opened to correspond with the degree the extensions and flaps are removed therefrom. I accomplish this result by rods 11 and 12 secured at their lower ends to the extensions 8 and flaps 10, and passed through the cylinder and through openings in a flange 13 at the upper end of the cylinder. The rods 11, 12 are threaded at their upper ends and are secured in proper adjusted position by nuts n, n.

In operation there must always be some space between extensions 8, fiaps 10 and the bottom of the cylinder 6, because the air that carries the dust or other material into the separator must pass into the cylinder after the dust particles have been separated. out. This will be better apparent from the following description of the operation of the separator. \Ve will assume thatthe intake 5 has been connected to the conduit of'the which are to be separated from the air willbe forced outwardly by the centrifugal actron. Thus, as the dust particles are concentrated near the cylindrical wall of the casing- 1 they are also accelerated in their downward course by the vanes 7, until they are discharged off the end of each vane.

The moving body of air, after the heavier dust particles have been precipitated, escapes into the cylinder '6 through the spaces between the lower end otsaid cylinder and vane extensions and flaps 10. Should the dust particles be very light they may not readily discharge from the ends of vanes 7, in which event the rods are adjusted downwardly thus lowering the discharge \end of the vane and increasing the downward inclination thereof. This downward adjustment of the vane discharge. end, also increases the space between the extension 8 and bottom of cylinder 6, thus enlarging the air outlet from the casing. Therefore, it may be necessary to compensate for this by adjusting rods 12' so as to close the space between flap 10 and the cylinder 6.

Thus the extensions 8 and'fiaps 10 maybe adjusted to vary the air discharge from the casing or the inclination of the discharge end of the vane, or both of these discharges may be adjusted to suit the conditions and obtain the greatest eificiency from the separator.

In the modification shown in Figures 5 and 6, I accomplish the same object by slightly different means. Instead of two helical vanes, there are four vanes 20, each of which has a right angled extension 21 projecting over one quarter of the lower end of cylinder 6. .A rod 22 is connected to the extension of each vane near the discharge end thereof, said rod being secured to the flange of cylinder 6 similarly to the rods of the main form. In adjusting the rod of any vane the air discharge space between extens on 21 and the bottom of the cylinder 6. and the inclination of the discharge end of the vane are adjusted together. The operation of the modified form of separator is the same as that of the main form.

Obviously, the separator may be operated by suction applied to the air outlet 3 in lieu of plenum applied to the inlet 5. Other modifications within the purview of the skilled mechanic are also contemplated as being within the invention.

Having described my invention, 1 claim:

1. A separator of the character described comprising a cylindrical casing havinga tangentially disposed 1nlet for dust laden air, an air outlet at the top thereof, and a conical hopper at the bottom thereof, an air receiving cylinder communicating with said outlet and disposed within the casing, said cylinder having its axis coincident with that of the casing, a plurality of helical vanes between the casing and cylinder, the lower ends of said vanes being movable and being provided with suitable extensions contiguous to the lower end of the aforesaid cylinder, and means for adjusting the plane of inclinationof the vane terminals and the extensions to and from the cylinder.

2. A separator of the character described comprising a cylindrical casing having a tangentially disposed inlet for dust laden air, an air outlet at the top thereof, and a conical hopper at the bottom thereof, an air receiving cylinder communicating with said outlet and disposed within the'casing, said cylinder having its axis coincident with that of the casing, a plurality of helical vanes between the casing and cylinder, the lower ends of said vanes being movable and being provided with suitable extensions contiguous to the lower end of the aforesaid cylinder, means for adjusting the plane of inclination of the vane terminals, air discharge valves hingedly secured to the said extensions, and means for moving said valves to adjust the air discharge opening into the receiving cylinder.

3. A separator of the character described comprising a cylindrical casing having a tangentially disposed inlet for dust laden air, an air outlet at the top thereof, and a conical lio'pper at the bottom thereof, an air receiving cylinder communicating with said outlet and disposed within the casing, said cylinder having its axis coincident with that of the casing, a plurality of helical vanes between the casing and cylinder, air discharge valves adjacent to the lower end of the receiving cylinder, and means for adjusting the position of said valves toregulate the air discharge into the cylinder.

4. A separatorjiof the character described comprising a cylindrical casing having a tangentially disposed inlet for dust laden air, an air outlet at the top thereof, and a conical hopper at the bottom thereof, an air receiving cylinder communicating with said outlet and disposed within the casing, said cylinder having its axis coincident with that of the casing, a plurality of helical vanes between the casing and cylinder, inclined dis charge members for the dust adjacent to the vanes and means for adjusting the angle of inclination of said members.

In testimony whereof I hereunto afiix my signature.

ERNEST F. FISHER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4303423 *Feb 3, 1978Dec 1, 1981The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyEngine air cleaner
US4559068 *Aug 15, 1984Dec 17, 1985Tetra Pak International AbArrangement for the separation of particles
US5224976 *Dec 11, 1989Jul 6, 1993N.V. Nederlandse GasunieDevice for separating liquids and/or solids from a high-pressure gas stream
US6829804Mar 26, 2002Dec 14, 2004White Consolidated, Ltd.Filtration arrangement of a vacuum cleaner
US6863702May 5, 2003Mar 8, 2005White Consolidated Ltd.Bagless dustcup
US7228592Nov 18, 2005Jun 12, 2007Electrolux Homecare Products Ltd.Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air path
US7544224Aug 4, 2004Jun 9, 2009Electrolux Home Care Products, Inc.Cyclonic vacuum cleaner
US8756755Jan 15, 2009Jun 24, 2014Ab ElectroluxVacuum cleaner
CN102294135BJul 21, 2011Jun 19, 2013无锡荣丰生物工程有限公司Crystal-magma separator device
Classifications
U.S. Classification55/417, 55/457, 55/422
International ClassificationB04C5/00, B04C5/02
Cooperative ClassificationB04C5/02
European ClassificationB04C5/02