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Publication numberUS1565630 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1925
Filing dateNov 18, 1921
Priority dateOct 11, 1918
Publication numberUS 1565630 A, US 1565630A, US-A-1565630, US1565630 A, US1565630A
InventorsEgerton Henry C
Original AssigneeHarry L Duncan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of making books and covers
US 1565630 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 15, 1925. 1.565.630

v H. C. EGERTON PROCESS OF MAKING BOOKS AND COVERS Original Filed Oct. 11. 1918 BY ZVENTOR.

ATTORNEY.

Patented Dec. 15, 1925.

UNITED STATES" PATENT OFFICE.

HENRY C. EGERTON, OF PASSAIC, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO HARRY Id- DUNCAN, 0F

RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY. Y

PROCESS OF MAKING BOOKS AND COVERS.

Original application filed October 11, 1918, Serial No. 257,706. Divided and this application d November 18, 1921.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it'known that I, HENRY C. EGERTON, a citizen of the United States,'and now a resident of Passaic, county of Passaic,-State of New Jersey, have made acertain new and useful Invention Relating to Processes of Making Books and Covers, of which the following is a specification, taken in connection with the accompanying drawing.

This case is a division of my copending application Serial Number 257,706, filed October 11,1918.

- This invention relates especially to processes of'making books or detachable or other book covers for large or heavy books. The cover back which may be of canvas or other suitable fabric may, if desired, be toughened and strengthened against, wear by being impregnated or coated with rubber or other suitable material and this back member may have integral attachingportions cemented or otherwise secured to the covers; n The book covers may, if they are to withstand hard usage, be advantageously formed of canvas or other fabric or material carrying phenolic condensation cementing material, and a number of superimposed layers of canvas, paper or other fabric, may beusimultaneously stiffened, strengthened and secured together and cemented to the back member by such heat and pressure curing methods as are adapted to mold and harden such ce menting material as bakelite, condensite or redmanol varnish compositions. It is quite advantageous in some cases to have vulcanized rubber portions or wear resisting members incorporated with the book covers,

and corners or other members thereof may be advantageously secured to the book covers by the same heat curing treatment which cures and solidifies the phenolic condensation cementing material, if desired, Detachable book covers of this general construction may be formed with flexible securing flaps or members attached to the back and cover members and a fold of the back fabric maybe utilized for this purpose, preferably after being coated or impregnated with suitable toughening, strengthening material, such as a light coating of vulcanized rubber, or if desired,.a speciallysoft flexible phenolic COIldQIlSfltIOI), cementing mafiled Serial No. 516,085.

terial comprising castor oil or other suitform of book cover.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged transverse section thereof, parts being shown in'separated position for greater clearness.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view through another book construction; and

Fig. dis a corresponding enlarged detail,

parts being shown in separated position.

As indicated in Figs. 1 and 2, the book back 3 may be formed of one or more layers of canvas or other suitable fabric which may have folded or other attaching portions, such as 7 8, adapted to be cemented or otherwise attached or secured to the book covers. Phenolic condensation cementing material :may be advantageously used for this purpose, particularly if the book covers are formed of paper, fabric or other fibrous material carrying or more or less impregnated with such cementing material. -A convenient way of forming such attaching portions is to form folds 7, 8 on either side of the book back and coat or impregnate such attaching folds with phenolic condensation cementing material of any suitable character, such, for instance, as bakelite varnish No. 1, which may be conveniently dried at moderate temperatures of 175 to 200 F. ,Such impregnated or coated attaching folds. may be securely cemented to the cover which may be formed of or com prise one or more layers of similarly impregnated canvas or other fabric or, if desired, paper, cardboard, or other fibrous material which is preferably sufficiently impregnated or coated with such cementing material so as to be suitably stiffened and strengthened thereby as well as cemented to the other parts of the cover. As indicated in Fig. 2 the covers may, if desired, comprise the canvas layers 10, 11, which may be formed by folding a single sheet of immediate layers 12 of canvas or other fabric, such as paper, etc. which may extend adjacent the edge of the attaching folds 7, S to make the cover member of substantially uniform thickness.

This entire cover member may be cemented together and moulded in shape, and if desired embossed and ornamented, in a suitable mold or press in which it can be submitted to the desired curing heat of 250 to 320 F. more or less for half an hour or an hour or so until the phenolic condensation cementing material is cured preferably under pressure so as to securely unite all of the parts and force the cementing material uniformly therethrough which gives an extremely strong union and greatly stiffens the cover elements. For some purposes it is desirable to incorporate vulcanized rubber members or portions on the cover, such, for instance, as corner reenforcements 13, which may be carried up around the edges as at 14 in Fig. 2 and a similar vulcanized rubber re-enforcing strip 15 may be used, for instance, at the inside edge of the cover adjacent the back. Sheets or layers of such material may be arranged 1n proper place on the book covers when they are submitted to such a pressure heat curing treatment. A connector strip such as 16 of relatively thin canvas or other fabric, and which may have a frictioned or other rubber coating 17 previously provided thereon adjacent the layer 15 of vulcanir able rubber, may be used to promote the union of the rubber to the other elements, the phenolic condensation cementing material sufficiently engaging and entering this connector fabric during the molding and curing operation to secure it firmly in place. Such a cover may of course be cemented or united at the same time its elements are cured to the ordinary securing flaps or portions of a book body of any suitable character, or if desired, it may be used as a detachable book cover, in which case it is usually desirable to form thereon special disengageable securing flaps or members. For this purpose the back fabric may, for instance, be formed with a single or double fold or flap such as 4, 5, which may be carried up adjacent the inner edge of each cover member and if desired have an attaching portion 9 extending under one or more of the layers of cover fabric 11. This securing flap is of course preferably relatively flexible, but may advantageously in some cases be strengthened by impregnating or coating it with a suitable rubber composition which may be vulcanized during the heat curing process, or if desired, such flaps, which may in some cases be providedwith eyelets or lie-enforced apertures 6, may be coated or impregnated w tlra specially flexible phenol-1c condensation cementing material, such, for instance, as bakelite varnish N0. 1 with which has been incorporated suitable proportions of softening agents such as analin, waxy, fatty or oily material, such for example, as 20 to 35 per cent by weight of castor oil which readily unites when mixed with moderate heat with such cementing material. By applying such special phenolic condensation cementing material to the fabric and forcing it into the same preferably when moderately heated the desired degree of penetration or impregnation can readily be secured and when heated for a suilicient time this cementing material is permanently cured, although it retains, however, considerable flexibility, so that the fabric is not unclesirably stiff and brittle if sutlicient softening material has been used. If desired, the back member may be originally impregnated or coated with such special soft curing bake lite or other phenolic condensation cementing material throughout the back and securing flap portions, and if desired heat cured or treated so as to complete these parts before or after the other parts of the fabric constituting the attaching portions are impregnated with regular hard curing cementing material of this general character and cured and cemented to the other co-operating book elements.

Figs. 3 and at show another arrangement in which a regular book body 22 which may have the ordinary tapes 23 and connecting fabric 24 attached thereto so as to form projecting attaching edges 25 of these fabrics, may be bound in a special book cover and back of this general construction. The cover members 20, 21 may be permanently or temporarily connected to a fabric or other back of canvas or other suitable material which may be coated or impregnated with rubber or soft curing bakelite or other phenolic condensation cementing material if desired. These cover members may comprise the superimposed canvas or other layers 26, 28 on the outside thereof and one or more intermediate layers 27, 2t of canvas or other cloth, paper, etc. carrying sufficient phenolic condensation cementing material so that under the heat and pressure curing treatment all the parts are permanently cemented together and the fabric sulliciently stiffened and strengthened so as to be desirable for this service. In some cases the cover members may be temporarily connected with the flexible back as by sewing or by partially curing the phenolic condensation cementing material they contain while leaving one or more of the cover layers such as 28 in relatively uncured condition so that they may be bent back preferably when somewhat softened by moderate heating to insert the attaching ends 25 of the book; tapes or other securing Ill) ; bodiments, forms, proportions, elements,

parts, shapes, materials, compositions, and methods of preparation, production and use, to the details of which disclosure the invention is not of course to be limited,

sincewhat is claimed as new and what is desired to besecured by Letters Patent is set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. The process of making book covers which comprises superimposing ,a number of layers of canvas fabric carrying phenolic condensation cementing material to form stiffened covers, interposing flexible back members to unite said covers and incorporating vulcanized rubber wear resisting members on exposed portions of said covers and uniting and molding the elements of said covers and simultaneously curing said phenolic condensation material and yulcanized rubber by subjecting the elements to a heat and pressure curing treatment.

2. The process of making book covers which comprises superimposing a number of layers of fabric carrying phenolic con densation cementing material to' form stiffened covers, interposing back members to unite said covers and incorporating Vulcanized rubber members and uniting and molding the elements of said covers and simul taneously curing said phenolic condensation material and. vulcanized rubber by subject ing the elements to a heat and pressure curing treatment.

3. The process of making book covers which comprises superimposing a number of layers of fabric carrying phenolic condensation cementing material to form stiffened covers, inter-posing the edge portions of flexible back members to unite said covers and uniting and molding the elements of said covers and simultaneously curing said pl'icnolic condensation material by subjecting the elements to a heat and pressure curiug trcatn'ient.

4.. The process of making book covers which comprises superimposing a number of layers of fabric carrying phenolic condensation cementing material to form stiffened covers, assembling in connection therewith back members to unite said covers and uniting the elements of said covers and curing said phenolic condensation material by subjGili-illg the elements to a heat and pressure curing treatment.

The process of making book covers which comprises assembling a plurality of layers of fabric and fibrous material carrying and impregnated with phenolic condensation cementing material, arranging in connection therewith a flexible back element and connecting elements adaptedto unite suchbook covers and secure book members thereto and subjecting such cover elements to heat and pressure to cure the phenolic condensation cementing material and unite and. stiffen said elements.

6. The process of making book covers 'which comprises assembling a plurality of layers of fibrous material carrying phenolic condensation cementing material, arranging in connection therewith a back element and connecting elements adapted to unite such book covers and secure book members thereto and subjecting such coverelements to heat and pressure to cure the phenolic condensation cementing material and unite and stiffen said elements.

7. The process of making book covers, which comprises assembling fibrous material carrying phenolic condensation cementing material, arranging in connection therewith connecting elements adapted to unite such book covers and secure book members thereto and subjecting such cover elements to heat and pressure to cure the phenolic condensation cementing material and unite and stiffen said elements.

8. The process of making book covers which comprises superimposing a plurality of fabric elements carrying phenolic condensation cementing material, arranging in connection therewith connecting elements adapted to unite such book covers and secure book members thereto and subjecting such cover elements to heat and pressure to cure the phenolic condensation cementing mate rial and unite and stiffen said elements.

9. The process of making book covers which comprises superimposing a plurality 'of fabric elements carrying phenolic condensation cementing material and wear resisting cushioning elements comprising rubher to cooperate with exposed portions of the covers, and subjecting such cover elements to heat and pressure to cure the phenolic condensation cementing material and rubber and unite and stiffen said elements.

10. The process of making book covers which comprises assembling fibrous elements carrying phenolic (ifondensation cementing material, assembling in connection therewith rubber elements and connecting elements adapted to unite such book covers orsecure book members thereto and subjecting such cover elements to heat and pressure to cure the phenolic condensation cementing material and unite and stiffen said elements.

11. The process of making book covers which comprises assembling fibrous elements carrying phenolic condensation cementing material and subjecting such cover elements to heat and pressure to cure the phenolic condensation cen'renting material and unite and stiffen said elements.

12. The process of making books or covers which comprises superimposing layers of fabric or fibrous cover elements carrying phenolic condensation cementing material, interposing book connecting elements adapted to unite such book covers and secure book members thereto and subjecting such elen'ients to heat and pressure to cure the phenolic condensation cementing material and unite and stiffen said elements.

13. The process of making books or covers which comprises assembling layers of fibrous cover elements carrying phenolic condensation cementing material, arranging in connection therewith book elements adapted to secure book members thereto and subjecting such elements to heat and pressure to cure the phenolic condensation cementing material and unite and stifien said elements.

145. The process of making books or book covers which comprises superimposing layers of fabric cover element-s carrying phenolic condensation cementing material, arranging in connection therewith connectingelements adapted to secure book members thereto and subjecting such elements to heat and pressure to cure the phenolic condensation cementing material and unite said elements.

HENRY o. EGERTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5213369 *Feb 27, 1992May 25, 1993Monica EvansNotebook construction
US5651628 *Oct 26, 1995Jul 29, 1997Samsill CorporationLoose-leaf binder and method and apparatus for manufacturing improved loose-leaf binders
US6213669Jun 18, 1999Apr 10, 2001Avery Dennison CorporationInflatable binder
DE3047230A1 *Dec 16, 1980Jul 1, 1982To Broxten Axel Dr D BrinkmannSpine reinforcement for correspondence folder - uses strips of semi-circular profile applied between folding links on spine
Classifications
U.S. Classification281/29, 281/36
International ClassificationB42D3/00, B42D3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB42D3/02
European ClassificationB42D3/02