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Publication numberUS1566227 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1925
Filing dateMar 26, 1924
Priority dateMar 26, 1924
Publication numberUS 1566227 A, US 1566227A, US-A-1566227, US1566227 A, US1566227A
InventorsWilliam Pleasant John
Original AssigneeWilliam Pleasant John
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coil spreader
US 1566227 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 15, 1925- J. N. PLEASANT COIL SPREADER Filed March 25. 1924 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 mma-J llHM-m- Jar/2210! Dec. 1925' J w, PLEASANT COIL SPREADER 4 Sheets5heet 2 Filed March 26. 1924 J. W. PLEASANT Dec. 15 I 1925.

c011, SPREADER 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 26, 1924 Dec. 15 1925 1,566,227

' J. W. PLEASANT COIL SPREADER 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed March 26. 1924 Patented Dec. 15, "925.

UNITED STATES JOHN WILLIAM PLEASANT, OF VALLEY JUNCTION, IOWA.

COIL SPREADER.

Application filed March 26, 1924. Serial No. 702,039.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, JOHN IV. PLEASANT, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Valley Junction, in the county of Polk.

and State of Iowa, have invented a certain new and useful Coil Spreader, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to coil spreaders, to-wit, that type of machines by which coils for the rotors or stators of motors and generators are spread and shaped to proper position for assembling in the finished machine.

The spreading of coils of this type involves several problems.

It is my purpose to provide a machine adapted for use for spreading and shaping such coils for generators and the like of different sizes.

It is therefore my purpose to provide a machine having parts adjustable so that coils of a great variety of lengths may be spread and shaped for installation in generators and the like of different sizes, lengths and radii.

A further object is to provide such a machine having parts readily adjustable for properly spreading the coils for siXple generators and the like or for completed devices having different numbers of poles.

A further object is to provide a coilspreader having adjustable parts whereby the coils may be made for different lengths of core, different spread of core and different radii.

A further object is to provide in such a machine, a structure wherein the jaws or vises are quickly and readily adjustable.

A further purpose is to provide a machine having means for quickly and accurately adjusting the parts to the proper position for readily visibly indicating the proper adjustment for various radii and for different spreads or angles.

With these and other objects in view, my

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a coil Sp ea er e yi e' y i eti. 1-.-

Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the same.

Fig. 3 is a vertical, sectional View taken on the line 33 of Fig. 2.

Fig. fl: shows a perspective view of a coil before it is spread.

Fig. 5 shows a perspective view of a coil after it has been spread and shaped.

Fig. 6 shows a detail sectional view illus-' trating the structure of the adjustable aws or vises.

Fig. 7 shows an elevation partly in section of a detail of the mechanism.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of the engaging means for the ends of the coil; and

Fig. 9 shows a diagrammatic view of a portion of a core illustrating the arrangement of'the coils assembled thereon.

My improved coil spreader comprises a frame having two laterally spaced upright rear frame members indicated in the accompanying drawings by the reference character 10. The machine has two front laterally spaced upright frame members 11 standing approximately waist high. The members 10 extend upwardly substantially above the upper ends of the members 11, as shown in Fig. 1.

The members 10 and 11 are connected at the sides of the machine with horizontal side frame members 12.

At the sides and back of the machine, I preferably provide suitable diagonal braces 13 At the upper ends of the members 10 are forwardly extending frame members 14, which are shorter than the members 12 and are connected at their forward ends by a cross member 15.

A machine of this kind must spread the coil from its shape shown in Fig. 4 to various shapes, one of which is illustrated in Fig. The coil in Fig. 4 is indicated by the reference character 16. In Fig. 5, I have shown what may be called the sides 16 of the coil. gralnmatic view illustrating the arrangement of the coils after they have been spread and are assembled on a core.

I have illustrated the arrangement of coilsv for a six-pole machine, in which the side edges 16" of the coil are separated sixty degrees. The ends of the coils are shaped in the customary way to allow them to clear each other.

In Fig. 9, I have shown a dia- The providing of a machine which will spread coils for different cores involves the problem of keeping the sides 16 of the coil in such shapes and positions with relation to each other that the sides of each coil will fit into slots in the core arranged sixty of the coil are spread in the example under consideration sixty degrees on any circle, they will still fit into radial slots.

My machine involves the provision of a set of jaws laterally adjustable for coils of ditlerent lengths, but fixed in such manner to hold one side of the coil in vertical position during the complete spreading operation.

It involves another set or pair of jaws for holding the other side of the coil, swinging it through the desired arc of a circle, for instance sixty degrees, and for twisting said other side until it also will fit into a proper radial slot. These jaws, of course, must also be laterally adjustable for use with coils of different lengths.

I provide a third pair of jaws for holding the ends 16 of the coil and properly shaping them during the spreading operation.

I shall now describe the first pair of jaws.

Supported on the frame members 12 at the sides of the machine adjacent to the rear thereof are brackets 17 illustrated for instance in Fig. 1. The brackets 17 support fore-and-aft spaced horizontal bars 18, shown in Figs. 3 and 6. The first pair of jaws are slidably mounted on the bars 18 for lateral adjustment and comprise in each instance a body 19, slidably mounted on the bars 18 having a forwardly projecting member 20 (see Fig. terminating in an upwardly extending gripping jaw member 21. (See also Fig. 6.)

Extending upwardly from the body 19 is a lug '22 having a screw-threaded hole to receive a threaded shaft 23. The shaft 23 is provided with right and left hand screw threads for the respective jaw members mounted thereon.

The shaft 23 is rotatably mounted at its ends in the brackets 17 as shown for instance in Fig. 1, and has a crank 2!; on its end.

By operating the crank 2 L, the-jaw members 19 maybe laterally adjusted toward or from each other on the right and left hand screw threads ofth'e shaft 23.

Slidably mounted above each extension 20 is an adjustable jaw member 25. This jaw member is slidably mounted on a pair of rods 26 extending forwardly from an upwardly projecting portion 27 of the body 19. Pull springs 28 mounted on the rods 26 and secured to the portion 27 and the jaws 25 tend to yieldingly hold the jaws 25 in open position.

Slidably mounted in the portion 27 of each jaw member 21 is a short rod or the like 29 having a screwsocket 80. Fixed to each jaw member 25 is a screw-threaded extension 31 adjustably received in the sock et 30.

Mounted off-center on the pin 32 and thus supported on the body 19 of each jaw now under consideration is an eccentric cam 33, having a handle 3 1-. The eccentric cam coacts with the rod 29 for forcing the jaw member 25 toward the jaw member 21 against the tension of the springs 28.

The limit of forward movement of the jaw members 25 may be adjusted by rotating the sockets 30 and varying the screwthreaded connection between said sockets and the extensions 31.

In actual practice, one sine 16 of the coil is placed adjacent to the jaw member 21, the handle 3 1 is manipulated for moving the jaw member 25 toward the coil side 16, and the socket 30 is then rotated for moving the jaw 25 toward the coil side 16 until such jaw member 25 snugly engages the coil.

Owing to the construction of my machine, the jaws do not need to grip the coils tightly. It is only necessary that the jaw members 21 and 25 stand in position to prevent twisting of the coils and for holding them so that the coil side 16, shown for instance in Fig. 6, will remain with its vertical axis unchanged during the spreading operation.

It will be seen that by adjustment of the sockets 30 the jaws now under consideration can be readily adjusted for operating on coils with diiferent numbers and sizes of wire and therefore of different thickness.

After the coil has been spread, the jaws will quickly and easily release it upon movement of tile handle for moving the cam 33 to position for permitting the springs 28 to function in moving the jaw member 25 away from the member 21.

I will now describe the second or swinging set of jaw members, which engage the other side 16 of the coil 16 for swinging it away from the side engaged by the jaw members 21 and 25 through a certain number of degrees for thus effecting the spreading opera tion. 2

At each side of the machine is a pair of fore-and-a-ft spaced bars or the like 35. The said bars are so located that the mechanism now being described will normally support the second pair of jaws by gravity immediately above the first pair of aws heretofore described.

On the respective pairs of bars at the sides of the machine are mounted brackets 36 for vertical sliding movement. For effecting this vertical sliding movement, each bracket 36 is provided with a lug 37 having a screw-threaded vertical opening therein to receive a vertical threaded rod 38. The rods 38 at'each side of the machine are rotably mounted in bearings 36 andare pro vided at their upper ends with beveled gears 40, illustrated for instance in Fig. 2; f

Mounted in bearings 41 at the top of the machine is a transverse shaft 42, having beveled gears thereon which mesh with the beveled gears 40. The shaft 42 is op erated by a crank handle 44 for rotating the screw-threaded rods 38 and thus raising or lowering the brackets The brackets 36 have forwardly projecting portions 36*, as shown for instance in Fig. 1, which support a transverseshaft 45.

The shaft 45 is supported for free rotation in the extensions 36*.

.The second pair of jaw members now under consideration are supported from the shaft 45 forlateral adjustment thereon and for adjustment toward and from said shaft. Each of said second pair of jaws is supported in the following manner:

A pair of clamp members 46 is slidably mounted on the shaft 45. The clamp members 46 are provided on opposite sides of the shaft 45 with registering pairs of grooves 47 to receive a pair of normally upright shafts or rods 48, and to grip and hold said shafts. The clamp members 46 of each pair are locked together by means of screw bolts 49, having operating handles 50 extending from their heads.

llhile it is desirable that the clamp mem- 46 should be slidably adjustable on the shaft, 45, it is also desirable that they should be capable of being locked on said shaft so as to cause them to rotate with the shaft and to prevent their accidentalisliding movement during a spreading operation. 1 V

For accomplishing these results, the shaft is provided with a longitudinal groove and one of each pair of clamp members 52 adapted 1 4-6 is provided with a set screw to project into the groove 5i.

Mounted on the lower ends of the pair of shafts or rods 48 is a jaw member body 53, having at its rear end a downwardly projecting engaging jaw me1nber54 similar to the jaw member 21 already described.

A jaw member 55 similar to the aw member 25 is mounted on the jaw member in the same manner that the jawmember 25 is mounted on the jaw member 19. The downward projecting member 56 on the jaw member 53 has a pair of rods or the like 57 similar to the rods 26. l 5 i i The jaw member 55 is normally held opened by coil springs 58 on the rods 57 secured to the jaw member 55 and to the extension 56.

V adjustments have been made.

Referring now to the second pair of jaw members, it will be obvious that by placing one side of a coil between the jaw members 21 and 25 and the other side of the coil between the jaw members 54 and 55, as shown for instance in Fig. 6, then if the jaw members 55 and 54 are swung through an angle of sixty degrees, the sides of the coil will have been spread sixty degrees on the arc of a circle, the radius of which is the distance between the center of the shaft 45 and the jaw members 21 and 25, and the coilwill have been properly spread for use in a sixpole structure.

For indicating the number. of degrees through which the second pair of jaws are moved and for limiting such movement to the proper number of degrees, I have provided the following means:

On one end of the shaft 45 is an indicat ond pair of jaws.

The plate 59 is provided with a series .of holes 61 to receive a pin 62. If the pin 62 is set for instance in the hole adjacent to the particular character provided to indicate 60 degrees, then the pointer 58 will engage the pin 62, when the second pair of jaws are swung through the proper arc of a circle, and prevent any further swinging movement.

' It will thus be seen that if sixty degrees is the proper desired spread, the pin 62 may be adjusted to the proper position, and thereupon the second pair of jaws can be swung only to theproper distance.

I will now describe the mechanism for imparting swinging movement to the second pair of'jaws.

7 It may be saidthat a shaft 63 is extended through the extensions 56, as shown in Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 6. Extending downwardly from the extensions 56 are arms 64. A shaft 65 is extended through the lower ends of the arms 64. The shafts 63 and 65 may be replaced with other shafts of different lengths when the second pair of jaws are moved farther apart, and longer shafts substituted.

A frame device 66 has one end supported by the shaft 65 between the respective arms 64 and projects normally rearwardly in the machine as shown in Fig. 1. A brace arm 67 is supported on the shaft 63 and eX- tends downwardly .and rearwardly to and is connected with the frame member 66.

Supported on the frame members 12 near the front of the machine is a transverse shaft 68 on which about the middle of the machine from side to side is a drum 69, to which is secured a cable or chain or the like 7 0, one end of which is fastened to the rearward end of the frame member 66.

On the shaft 68 is a beveled gear 71. Supported on the frame is a sleeve 72 through which projects a shaft 73 shown for instance in Fig. 1. On the lower end of the shaft 73 is a small beveled gear 74 (see Fig 2) meshing with the beveled gear 71.

The shaft 72 is inclined as shown in Fig. 1, so that its upper end may support the crank 75 in a convenient manner for manipulation by an operator standing in front of the machine.

It will be seen that by operating the crank 75, the chain 70 can be wound upon the shaft 68 for swinging the second pair of jaws from their position shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 6 with a swinging movement to their position for instance illustrated in Fig. 3.

lVhen the shaft 73 is rotated in the opposite direction, the second pair of jaws will drop by gravity to their normal position.

The operation of the second pair of jaws spreads the sides of the coil a proper distance apart, but it is still necessary to provide means for giving the proper shape to the ends 16 of the coil, and I will describe the means for accomplishing this latter pur pose.

On the shaft 45 on opposite sides of the shafts 48. which support the second pair of jaw members are mounted clamping devices 16 which support shafts 76 similar to the shafts 73, except that they are preferably shorter. The clamps t6 are similar to the clamps 16, except that the set screws 52 are omitted therefrom, and the clamps 16 may rotatcfreely on the shaft 15 and slide freely thereon.

Furthermore, to one member of each pair of clamp members 46, to-wit. the one nearest the adjacent pair of shafts -18, there is secured a spacer sleeve 77 for holding the shafts 76 spaced from the shafts 18.

The shafts 76 are adjustable in the clamps in the same manner that the shafts .418 are adjustable in the clamps 46.

Z6 are Sheri? a in ure the jaws supported thereby normally hanging downwardly.

.Nhere the shaft 45' is raised to considerable height, the shafts 76 may be lengthened by screwing extension 78 into the upper ends thereof. (See Fig. 2.) The lower end of each pair of shafts 76 supports a bar or block 79, shown for instance in Figs.

1, 2 and 3. Each bar 79 supports two normally horizontally spaced shafts 80 projecting from the bar 7 9 toward the adjacent side of the machine. (See Figs. 1, 2 and 3.)

Each pair of shafts 8O slidably supports a jaw device, such as that shown for instance in Fig. 8, comprising the block 81 slidably mounted on the shafts 80 (see Figs. 2 and 8). Supported on the block 81 is a jaw comprising spaced members 82 and 83. A notch is cut from the forward member at the upper inner portion thereof, as at 84:, and another is cut from the rearward member at the lower inner portion thereof, as at 85. The member 82 supports two laterally projecting pins 87 on which the member 83 is adjustably mounted and held inplace by set screws 87. The walls also have an opening 86 to receive a locking pin 88 suitably supported on the jaw member 82 for instance by means of ashort chain 89.

The blocks 81 slide freely on the shafts 80 .and the sleeves 77 slide freely on the shaft 15.

A swinging gauge 90 is slidably supported so that it may be used to the position of one end of the coil before spreading.

I shall now describe an illustrative oper ation of my improved machine, which description will bring out more clearly the construction of the machine and will show some of its advantages.

It will be understood that-the coils, such as those shown in Fig. 4:, having different numbers of windings and of different lengths, are used, and may be spread and that various kinds of coils may be spread on my machine. j

Assume that the length of the core on which the coils are to be used is such that the distance from A to B of the finished coil (see Fig. 5) is to be a certain number of inches.

The shaft 23 is operated to bring the first pair of jaw members that number of inches apart overall. The set screws 52 are loosened and the second pair of jaws are adjusted on the shaft 45, so they will hang directlyover the first pair of jaws, as illustrated in Figs. 2 and 6. The set screws 52 are then tightened.

If thecoils are to be spread for a six-pole structure, in which the sides 16 are sixty degrees apart, the pin 62 is set in the sixty degree hole in the plate 59.

One of the bar 35 i graduated,

cated at 90, (Fig. 1). I preferably use numerals running consecutively and so arranged that 1 represents a half inch, .2 two half inches and so on. Thus the graduations are so arranged that if the diameter of the core for which the coilsare'to be spread is twenty inches, the brackets 36 will be set at the graduation mark 20 which will leave the distance between the shaft 45 and the lower ijaws, fifteen inches which is the radius of the core orlone-half the diameter. 7

The parts being thus adjusted, th ethird pair of jaws is pushed laterally awayifrom' the second pair, and the coil '16, such. as that shown in Fig. 4:, is shoved from the side into the first and second pair of jaws as illustrated in Fig. 6.

I The members of-the third pair of jaws are then. slid inwardly toward each other and toward the coilto receive the ends of the coil between the walls 82 and 83. The pin 88 is shoved into position between the opposite sides of the coil. 7 I

It is, of course, assumed that the first and second pairs of jaws have been adjusted properly by means of the sockets 30 and the cams.

The operator then turns the crank-7 5 for swinging the second pair of aws from'their position shown in Fig. 6 to their position shown in Fig.3. The sides 1 6 will beheld in proper position to fit into the slots arranged sixty degrees apart and cut radially into the core.

The ends of the coil thus spread will be shaped by means of the third pair ofjaws, as shown in Fig. 3.

Insomuch as the third pair of jaws is mounted to swing freely, the bends in the ends 16 will be at the proper place for the proper shaping of the coil.

It will be obvious from the foregoing, that if it is desired to work on slightly longer coils, this can be done by laterally adjusting the first and second pairs of jaws.

The machine may be regulated for cores of different diameters or radii by raising and lowering the shaft 45, which carries the second and third pairs of jaws and by adjusting the shafts 48 and 76 in their clamps.

If it is desired to spread the coils, so that vthe sides thereof are separatedlproper distances, or if it is desired to twist the coils-for use in slots a different number of degrees apart on the periphery of the core, this isaccomplished by swinging the second pair o-f'jaws through a different are of a circle, the degrees being regulated by means of the pointer arm 58 and the pin 62.

It is not such a difficult matter to make a machine, which will spread coils of one size in a factory, but the making of a machine adapted to spread coils of differen sizes and kinds involves a large number of features of adjustability and accuracy of operation in all adjusted positions.

It will be seen that I have provided a machine adjustable for coils of different lengths, for spreading coils of different radii, and for spreading coils with the sides at different degrees of separation, and always arranged to fit into radial slots in the core.

'The first and second pair of jaws are readily adj ustable Without substituting jaws in the machine for accommodation to different coils. The structure of the jaws is simple, and they are readily and easily adjusted and operated.

Ihave provided gauges for regulating the degrees ofmovement of the second pair of jaws and for readily adjusting the machines for cores of different radii or diameters. i

The parts are all easily accessible for repairs or replacement.

Changes may be made in the details of the structure of my coil spreader, and itis my intention to cover by my claims, any modified forms Of structure or use of mechanical equivalents, -whioh may bereasonably included within their scope;

It may be perhaps'noted that different mechanisms might be used for swinging the secondpair ofcjaws.

It is also to be noted that for light coils,

the shaft 65 can be grasped by hand for.

performing the spreading operation, and the flexible member permits manual operation without interfering with the mechanism for operating the flexible member 7 0. The important advantage in a machine of this kind arises from the fact that the parts are so mounted that after a spread ooilhas been removed, the second and third pair of jaws will drop by gravity to the proper position'for the insertion of the next coil. It thus follows that my machine requires a minimum of readjustment after each coil spreading operation in order to put it into position for another such operation,

Ordinarily no means other than such as have been above described are necessary to i hold the sides of the coil during the spread ing operation. In a few instances, where untaped coils are spread, I find it advisable to use on each jaw member 25 and 55 a small adjustable bracket or the like 25 (see Fig. 6) to properly hold the coils in place.

'IVhen not in use, the brackets 25 may be removed or moved out of the way.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a coil spreader, a frame, a pair of jaws mounted thereon for lateral adjustlli) ment, a rod, means forsupporting and vertioally adjusting said rod, comprising a pair of upright spaced screw-threaded rods, in-

ternally screw-threaded brackets non-rotatably mounted on said screw-threaded rods,

and guides for said 'brackets,.said brackets supporting said first rod, and means for simultaneously rotating said screw-threaded rods, operatively connected with the upper endsoi? said screw-threaded rods, a second pair of jaws adjustably mounted on said first. rod, and means for swinging the sec ond pair of jaws.

2. In a coil spreader, a frame, a pair of jaws supported thereon for lateral adjustment, a pair of jaws pivotally hung above said first pair of jaws for lateral adjustment, means for varying the height of the aivot of the second. pair of jaws, a third pair of jaws pivotedinline with the pivot line of the second pair of jaws and mounted to be vertically adjusted when the second pair of jaws is adjusted, and means for varying the adjustment of the third pair of jaws with relation to their pivot line.

3. In a coil spreader, a frame, a pair of jaws mounted thereon for lateral adjustment, a pair of jaws pivotally hung above the first pair to hang. by gravity above the first pair, a third pairof jaws pivotally supported to normally swing by gravity to position substantially above the level of the first jaws, said thirdpair of jaws, having spaced members with portions cut out'substantially as shown.

4. In a coil spreader, a frame, a pair of jaws mounted thereon for lateral adjustment, a pair of-jaws pivotally hung above the first pair to hangby gravity above the first pair, a third pair of jaws pivotally supported to normally swing by gravity to position substantially above the level of the first jaws, said third pair of jaws having spaced members with portions cut out substantially as shown, and having removable pins for the purpose indicated.

In a coil spreader, a-frame, a pair of jaws mounted thereon for lateral adjustment, a rod supported on said frame above said jaws for vertical adjustment, clamps on said rod, pairs of rods. supported by said clamps for longitudinal adjustment with relation thereto, jaws supported on said pairs of rods adapted to hang normally by gravity above the first jaws, and means for swinging the second jaws for spreading coils.

6. In a coil spreader, a frame, a pair of jaws mounted thereon for lateral adjustment, a rod supported on said frame above said jaws for vertical adjustment, clamps on said rod, pairs of rods supported by said clamps for longitudinal adjustment with relation thereto, jaws supported on said pairs of rods adapted to hangrnormally by gravity above the first jaws, and means for swinging the second jaws for spreading coils, spaced clamps supported on said first rod, pairs of rods supported for longitudinal adjustment by the respective named spaced clamps, and athird pair of aws sup.- ported by said last. described pairs of rods adapted to normally hangby gravity above the level of the first jaws.

7. In a coil spreader, a frame, a pair of jaws mounted thereon for lateral adjust ment, a rod supported on said frame above saidjaws for vertical adjustment, clamps on said rods, pairs of rods supported by said clamps for longitudinal adjustment with relation thereto, a second pair ofljaws sup.- ported on said pairs of rods adapted to hang normally by gravity above the first jaws, and means for swingingthe second jaws for spreading, coils, said vmeans including a frame structure having amember normally projecting rearwardly witlrrelation to the normal position of thesecond pair of jaws, a flexible element, and means for actuating the flexible element for effecting the swinging movement of the second pair of jaws.

8." In a coil spreader, a frame, a pair of jaws mounted thereon for lateral adjustment, a rod supportedon saidframe above said aws for vertical adjustment, clamps on said rod, pairs of rods supportedby said clamps for longitudinal adjustment with relation thereto, aws supported on said pairs of rods adapted to hang n'ormally'bygrav- 1tyabove the first jaws, and means; for

swinging the second jaws for spreading coils, and means for indicating and limiting the-maximum swinging movement of the second pair of jaws.

9. In a coil spreader, a frame, a pair of jaws mounted thereon for lateral adj ustment, a second pair of'jaws pivotally hung above the first pair of jaws for'lateral adjustment, means for raising or lowering the pivot line of the second pair of jaws,'means for adjusting the second pair of jaws toward orfrom their pivot line, athird pair of jaws, means for pivotally supporting the third pair of jaws in the pivot line of the second pair of jaws, and means for varying the adjustment of-the third pair ofijaws toward and'from theirpivot line."-

10. In a coil spreader, frame, three pairs of jaws, means for fixing the first pair of jaws in a variety oflaterally adjusted positions, laterally adjustablemeans for pivotally supporting the second pair of jaws, means for pivotally supporting the-thirdpair of j aws, said second means being above the first pair of aws for normally causing the second pair of jaws to hang by gravity directly above the first pair, said second and third means being adjustable toward and from the first pair of jaws, and means for indicating;

the distance of said adjustment for thus determiningrthe adj ustmentof the machine for spreading coils for rotors or stators of varying radii.

11.. In a coil spreader, a frame, three pairs? ofjaws, means for fixing the first pair of jaws in a variety of laterally adjusted positions, laterally adjustable means for piv-,

otally hanging the second pair of j aws normally above the first pair, and laterally adjustable means for pivotally hanging the third pair of jaws normally on a level midway between the other two pairs, on pivots aligned with the pivots of the second pair of jaws.

12. In a coil spreader, a frame, horizontally spaced bars thereon, spaced jaws slidably supported on said bars, means for simultaneously adjusting said jaws toward and from each other, a transverse rod, means for mounting the transverse rod above said jaws for vertical adjustment, a second pair of jaws supported on said rod for adjustment toward and from the rod and for lateral adjustment thereon.

13. In a coil spreader, a frame, horiz0ntally spaced bars thereon, spaced jaws slidably supported on said bars, means for simultaneously adjusting said jaws toward and from each other, a transverse rod, means for mounting the transverse rod above said jaws for vertical adjustment, a second aair of jaws supported on said rod for adjustment toward and from the rod and for lateral adjustment thereon, and an indicating device movable with the said rod, comprising a member having graduations thereon and a pointer fixed on said rod to coact with said member.

14. In a coil spreader, a frame, horizontally spaced bars thereon, spaced jaws slidably supported on said bars, means for simultaneously adjusting said jaws toward and from each other, a transverse rod, means for mounting the transverse rod above said jaws for vertical adjustment, a second pair of jaws supported on said rod for adjustment toward and from the rod and for lateral adjustment thereon, and means for indicating the vertical adjustment of said rod.

15. In a coil spreader, a frame, horizontally spaced bars thereon, spaced jaws slidably supported on said bars, means for simultaneously adjusting said jaws toward and from each other, a transverse rod, means for mounting the transverse rod above said jaws for Vertical adjustment, a second pair of jaws supported on said rod for adjustment toward and from the rod and for lateral adjustment thereon, and means for indicating the vertical adjustmentof said rod according to the radii of the coil being operated upon.

16. In a coil spreader, a frame, horizontally spaced bars thereon, spaced jaws slidably supported on said bars, means {or simultaneously adjusting said jaws toward and from each other, a transverse rod, means for mounting the transverse rod above said jaws for vertical adjustment, a second pair of jaws supported on said rod for adjustment toward'and from the rod and for lat-- eral adjustment thereon, and an indicating device movable with the said rod, comprising a member having graduations thereon and a pointer fixed on said rod to coact with said member, said member having an adj ustable stop for coacting with said pointer.

17. In a coil spreader, a frame, a pair of jaws mounted thereon for lateral adjustment, a rod, means for supporting and vertically adjusting said rod, comprising a pair of upright spaced screw-threaded rods, internally screw-threaded brackets non-rotatably mounted on said screw-threaded rods, and guides for said brackets, said brackets supporting said first rod, and means for s'imultaneously rotating said screw-threaded rods, operatively connected with the upper ends. of said screw-threaded rods, a second pair of jaws adjustably mounted on said first rod, means for swinging the second pair of aws, and means for indicating the vertical adjustment of said brackets on said screw-threaded rods.

Des Moines, Iowa, February 28. 1924.

JOHN WILLIAM PLEASANT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2962076 *Jun 20, 1958Nov 29, 1960James Equipment Company IncCoil forming apparatus
US4558580 *Jun 19, 1984Dec 17, 1985Malcolm OttyCoil shaping apparatus
US4646550 *Oct 16, 1985Mar 3, 1987King Industrial Products Co., Inc.Coil bending machine with floating spreaders
US4964291 *May 5, 1986Oct 23, 1990Automated Coil Systems LimitedCoil shapers for coils of rotating electric machines
US6272893 *Apr 18, 2000Aug 14, 2001Abb Alstom Power (Schweiz) AgApparatus and method for bending winding bars
US8209851 *Apr 25, 2006Jul 3, 2012Tm4 Inc.Apparatus for shaping rectangular wire coil head
US20070000122 *Apr 25, 2006Jan 4, 2007Yves CayaRectangular wire coil head shaping machine and method therefore
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/31.1, 72/301
International ClassificationH02K15/04, B21D11/00, B21D11/10
Cooperative ClassificationB21D11/10, H02K15/045
European ClassificationH02K15/04D1F, B21D11/10